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high functioning having problems with the school

Posted by on Nov. 4, 2014 at 8:19 AM
  • 9 Replies
My dd is severely autistic and low functioning we have been at this school for two years and never had any problems.

She has an aid for all her school hours. She is self abusive, a runner, screams etc..

My ds (first grade) is neurotypical but his best friend has Aspergers and an IEP. They had a school drill and it upset Michael. When he gets upset his tics get worse.

He was making slurping noises and couldn't stop. He got in trouble for that and recieved a behavioural intervention form and a detention.

His mama went down to the school and said look at his IEP. It apparently said he could be controlled with medicine and that he was high functioning so they are saying he should be able to control himself.

I only mentioned my dd earlier to show she has extreme behaviours and she had never gotten in any trouble.

What should my friend do? It's not right what the school is doing and he's only in first grade so it's only going to get worse.

I'm always jealous of those with higher functioning kids but this I am not jealous of.
by on Nov. 4, 2014 at 8:19 AM
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SamMom912
by Platinum Member on Nov. 4, 2014 at 8:32 AM
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Funny.... I have a soft spot in my heart for children who are lower functioning so glad they get the help they need, so glad that the world is more accepting of them and their families... I certainly would NEVER deny any child getting the support and understanding they need, but I wish that it was the same for ALL children with an ASD DX and sadly that isn't the case. As my HFA son is constantly overlooked and penalized at school... But his momma is a BEAR and the school is starting to feel my wrath... LOL

I'm going to suggest that your friend ask for an FBA a functional behavior analysis for the behaviors that Michael is having difficulty with. If this is happening after a fire drill, it should be easy to predict... A behaviorist will observe Michael in the classroom after a difficult time and document what his behaviors are-- noting the antecedent (what happened before the behavior) the behavior itself, and after. The behaviorist can make suggestions about how the school can help modify the behavior and IF it/is controllable then the behaviors SHOULD extinguish with the behavior "plan"... If the behavior doesn't stop, then I'm guessing the school will realize it is not intended.. (And the professional behaviorist SHOULD point that out) and not punish the child for the behavior. 

It seems to me this is a voilation of IDEA... And I'm going to suggest that Michaels mom reach out to an independent living service in your state for a free educational advocate who can help her navigate the special education laws that the school is Violating. 


angelachristine
by Member on Nov. 4, 2014 at 8:39 AM
Thanks for the suggestions. She asked me what she should do and I really had no clue because my dd is so severe they knew better than to pull this with her. So I've never had these problems. I did tell her to get an advocate.

It was the change in routine that upset him.



Quoting SamMom912:

Funny.... I have a soft spot in my heart for children who are lower functioning so glad they get the help they need, so glad that the world is more accepting of them and their families... I certainly would NEVER deny any child getting the support and understanding they need, but I wish that it was the same for ALL children with an ASD DX and sadly that isn't the case. As my HFA son is constantly overlooked and penalized at school... But his momma is a BEAR and the school is starting to feel my wrath... LOL

I'm going to suggest that your friend ask for an FBA a functional behavior analysis for the behaviors that Michael is having difficulty with. If this is happening after a fire drill, it should be easy to predict... A behaviorist will observe Michael in the classroom after a difficult time and document what his behaviors are-- noting the antecedent (what happened before the behavior) the behavior itself, and after. The behaviorist can make suggestions about how the school can help modify the behavior and IF it/is controllable then the behaviors SHOULD extinguish with the behavior "plan"... If the behavior doesn't stop, then I'm guessing the school will realize it is not intended.. (And the professional behaviorist SHOULD point that out) and not punish the child for the behavior. 

It seems to me this is a voilation of IDEA... And I'm going to suggest that Michaels mom reach out to an independent living service in your state for a free educational advocate who can help her navigate the special education laws that the school is Violating. 

SamMom912
by Platinum Member on Nov. 4, 2014 at 8:44 AM

Im sure you're right-- the change, the unpredictability the loud noise (sensory)... He MAY  desensitize over time.. But in the interim it may be better for the school to prepare him (Via his IEP) that he is notified before a fire drill... That he wear headphones, that he knows what to expect. BUT, my issue is more with the school in their LACK of awareness, understanding and acceptance of what it is to be this child with this disability. 

The "invisibility" of it just becomes heartbreaking.. The "old school" thinking that the child can "control" himself or that he is "manipulating" .... Well, welcome to 2014... Where SE professionals and educators SHOULD know that IF Michael COULD do better, Micheal WOULD do better... That doing well with something is PREFERABLE to EVERYONE, and if he is NOT doing well then the demands of the situation have exceeded his capabilities. 

How sad that the ADULTS in Michaels school life are acting like the "children" and simply saying "do better." As if it was THAT easy for a 6/7 year old.... 


Quoting angelachristine: Thanks for the suggestions. She asked me what she should do and I really had no clue because my dd is so severe they knew better than to pull this with her. So I've never had these problems. I did tell her to get an advocate. It was the change in routine that upset him.
Quoting SamMom912:

Funny.... I have a soft spot in my heart for children who are lower functioning so glad they get the help they need, so glad that the world is more accepting of them and their families... I certainly would NEVER deny any child getting the support and understanding they need, but I wish that it was the same for ALL children with an ASD DX and sadly that isn't the case. As my HFA son is constantly overlooked and penalized at school... But his momma is a BEAR and the school is starting to feel my wrath... LOL

I'm going to suggest that your friend ask for an FBA a functional behavior analysis for the behaviors that Michael is having difficulty with. If this is happening after a fire drill, it should be easy to predict... A behaviorist will observe Michael in the classroom after a difficult time and document what his behaviors are-- noting the antecedent (what happened before the behavior) the behavior itself, and after. The behaviorist can make suggestions about how the school can help modify the behavior and IF it/is controllable then the behaviors SHOULD extinguish with the behavior "plan"... If the behavior doesn't stop, then I'm guessing the school will realize it is not intended.. (And the professional behaviorist SHOULD point that out) and not punish the child for the behavior. 

It seems to me this is a voilation of IDEA... And I'm going to suggest that Michaels mom reach out to an independent living service in your state for a free educational advocate who can help her navigate the special education laws that the school is Violating. 



angelachristine
by Member on Nov. 4, 2014 at 8:52 AM
It really makes me mad. They have tons of notes from his Dr and his IEP and it seems like because he's high functioning they want to pretend he doesn't have problems.

They talked to him after the fact and asked him if he knew what he had done wrong and he did know. so they are taking that to mean he was just acting out on purpose.

When really he may not have known at the time there was a problem or even if he did know he may not have been able to stop himself.

I'm just so disappointed in this school. It's made worse by the fact this teacher was a special ed teacher and taught my daughter for 2 years so he really should know better.

I feel so bad for Michael and his mom :(

Quoting SamMom912:

Im sure you're right-- the change, the unpredictability the loud noise (sensory)... He MAY  desensitize over time.. But in the interim it may be better for the school to prepare him (Via his IEP) that he is notified before a fire drill... That he wear headphones, that he knows what to expect. BUT, my issue is more with the school in their LACK of awareness, understanding and acceptance of what it is to be this child with this disability. 

The "invisibility" of it just becomes heartbreaking.. The "old school" thinking that the child can "control" himself or that he is "manipulating" .... Well, welcome to 2014... Where SE professionals and educators SHOULD know that IF Michael COULD do better, Micheal WOULD do better... That doing well with something is PREFERABLE to EVERYONE, and if he is NOT doing well then the demands of the situation have exceeded his capabilities. 

How sad that the ADULTS in Michaels school life are acting like the "children" and simply saying "do better." As if it was THAT easy for a 6/7 year old.... 

Quoting angelachristine: Thanks for the suggestions. She asked me what she should do and I really had no clue because my dd is so severe they knew better than to pull this with her. So I've never had these problems. I did tell her to get an advocate.

It was the change in routine that upset him.



Quoting SamMom912:

Funny.... I have a soft spot in my heart for children who are lower functioning so glad they get the help they need, so glad that the world is more accepting of them and their families... I certainly would NEVER deny any child getting the support and understanding they need, but I wish that it was the same for ALL children with an ASD DX and sadly that isn't the case. As my HFA son is constantly overlooked and penalized at school... But his momma is a BEAR and the school is starting to feel my wrath... LOL

I'm going to suggest that your friend ask for an FBA a functional behavior analysis for the behaviors that Michael is having difficulty with. If this is happening after a fire drill, it should be easy to predict... A behaviorist will observe Michael in the classroom after a difficult time and document what his behaviors are-- noting the antecedent (what happened before the behavior) the behavior itself, and after. The behaviorist can make suggestions about how the school can help modify the behavior and IF it/is controllable then the behaviors SHOULD extinguish with the behavior "plan"... If the behavior doesn't stop, then I'm guessing the school will realize it is not intended.. (And the professional behaviorist SHOULD point that out) and not punish the child for the behavior. 

It seems to me this is a voilation of IDEA... And I'm going to suggest that Michaels mom reach out to an independent living service in your state for a free educational advocate who can help her navigate the special education laws that the school is Violating. 

JanetJanMom
by Member on Nov. 4, 2014 at 12:10 PM
1 mom liked this

As a teacher in Special Education, I would like to suggest he following:

in writing, send a letter or email to the teacher requesting An informal IEP meeting to discuss her concerns. 

Get connected with an advocate.

Talking to you and reaching out to you was a great first step. Validating our concerns with others is helpful. It is empowering...because an IEP already exists, there is no need to call an IEP meeting to discuss what is already there, unless the school is not responsive to your friend's concerns.  They should not have trouble applying the IEP as it stands, which should have suggestions for dealing with the scenario you told. Of in your post. The next step is to meet with the teacher and then administration to discuss what happened. This will give the advocate additional information as to how to proceed and if an IEP meeting is to be requested by the parent, if so, it needs to be in writing. 

Something in the scenario is off, and I would be curious to now what the IEP has listed as behavioral goals. Also, social goals may need to be addressed further, if fire drills, and such other activities cause this student difficulty. Hopefully, the IEP is not fully focused on educational goals such as reading and math. 

If the IEP misrepresents the child's abilities, it needs to be revisited ASAP. There needs to be behavior intervention and support for the student besides medication. My hope is it was not a special education staff member giving her tthis information. Hopefully, the teachers and aides have a better understanding of he student and the IEP. 

Hottubgodess
by on Nov. 5, 2014 at 11:57 AM
1 mom liked this

She needs to call for a FBA IMMEDIATELY!!!  Being punished for a tic is against the law.  

angelachristine
by Member on Nov. 5, 2014 at 12:01 PM

He had to serve his detention today but I'm going to show her this and hopefully she can get them straightened out because they shouldn't punish him for tics and it's documented in his IEP so I don't know why they are trying to pull this. 


He got in trouble but didn't get a detention once before for chewing on his shirt which is another tic he has. The other kids were being loud and wouldn't settle down and it upset him.

Quoting Hottubgodess:

She needs to call for a FBA IMMEDIATELY!!!  Being punished for a tic is against the law.  


Hottubgodess
by on Nov. 5, 2014 at 12:56 PM

My son his 10 and HFA.  He was bullied in 2nd grade, and he spent time in ISS for being  a dangerous child.  I am all too familiar with the games the school plays.  She also needs to do everything in writing from now on - paper trail.  Clearly this teacher doesnt have a clue.  Behaviour is communication.  So what is his tic saying?  He is "anxious".  Ok, why?  She needs to push that point.  She also needs to remind them to focus less on his behaviour but the CAUSE.  ;)  BTDT....and this path is not fun, but she needs to be aggressive.  

Quoting angelachristine:

He had to serve his detention today but I'm going to show her this and hopefully she can get them straightened out because they shouldn't punish him for tics and it's documented in his IEP so I don't know why they are trying to pull this. 


He got in trouble but didn't get a detention once before for chewing on his shirt which is another tic he has. The other kids were being loud and wouldn't settle down and it upset him.

Quoting Hottubgodess:

She needs to call for a FBA IMMEDIATELY!!!  Being punished for a tic is against the law.  



MissMackiesgg
by on Nov. 5, 2014 at 12:59 PM

Get the rule book from the federal govt about the treatment of handicapped children.

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