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advice on non-stop talking!

Posted by on Oct. 22, 2016 at 7:34 PM
  • 14 Replies

My son Aiden is 6 year old first grader. Most people say they don't realize he's autistic until he begins to speak repetitively; He will talk randomly to himself either have a conversation that he heard or was apart of or will repeat lines from a cartoon he watches even go as far as run around and act out activities that happened in the cartoon. (Before the diagnosis  I believed it was him playing imagination like with an imaginary friend I couldn't see). Once he was diagnosed it made more sense. 2 years later (Present day). Even while eating he can't seem to keep quiet (lol)  

At first I thought he only did it when he was restless, now he does it while watching tv, eating dinner, if I ask him a question he'll stare blankly through me and begin either repeating me or a conversation we have had prior. 

I want to know are there any ways I can reduce how much he does this? Is it something I am doing wrong that makes him want to talk to himself or escape back into his mind? I feel really guilty, but I am worried because he is getting older starting to become more social and I don't want this holding him back any and I definitely don't want him to say the wrong thing to the wrong person (HE REPEATS ANYTHING ANYWHERE!). Is this apart of the spectrum or could it be a form of ADHD (which is what my husband thinks because he suffers from ADHD/ADD)


by on Oct. 22, 2016 at 7:34 PM
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Replies (1-10):
SamMom912
by Platinum Member on Oct. 22, 2016 at 7:51 PM
1 mom liked this
Id try to bring him back to reality and focus on you & real when he begins.

If he goes into a few sentences just regurgitating a previous conversation.. Ask him a question that gets him out of his head? Hingry? Thirsty? Plan for later? Look at this... Etc.. Its easy to get lost in his head- bring him back to now. Put your hand on him - sholder, leg, to make sure you have attention.
emarin77
by Gold Member on Oct. 22, 2016 at 9:25 PM
1 mom liked this

Pragmatic (social) therapy might help.  Telling your child he can talk to himself at a certain time or place can help too.  We do not talk to ourselves at dinner time, for example. My son talks to himself at home when he plays by himself in his room or playing a video game.  ADHD is hyperactivity (over active, like running) and forgetting to do regular activities that should be done during the day.  Not writing your homework in your notepad, for example.

MInnocent
by Member on Oct. 22, 2016 at 9:48 PM

My husband only figured ADD/ADHD because it seems as though it happens more often when  Aiden has nothing else to do. Like if his body isn't moving his mouth has to or has to have something in his hands at all times. 


Quoting emarin77:

Pragmatic (social) therapy might help.  Telling your child he can talk to himself at a certain time or place can help too.  We do not talk to ourselves at dinner time, for example. My son talks to himself at home when he plays by himself in his room or playing a video game.  ADHD is hyperactivity (over active, like running) and forgetting to do regular activities that should be done during the day.  Not writing your homework in your notepad, for example.


MInnocent
by Member on Oct. 22, 2016 at 10:03 PM

THANK YOU LADIES! 

Even though Aiden has been diagnoised for two years we are still learning how to manage and cope with his disorder especially gonig from low functioning to high functioning within a years time has its own battles. My husband and I have two very different parenting styles on how to best handle aiden. 


emarin77
by Gold Member on Oct. 22, 2016 at 10:07 PM

He can play with his toys, color, do his homework, or play a game with him.  Remind him during these times.

Quoting MInnocent:

My husband only figured ADD/ADHD because it seems as though it happens more often when  Aiden has nothing else to do. Like if his body isn't moving his mouth has to or has to have something in his hands at all times. 


Quoting emarin77:

Pragmatic (social) therapy might help.  Telling your child he can talk to himself at a certain time or place can help too.  We do not talk to ourselves at dinner time, for example. My son talks to himself at home when he plays by himself in his room or playing a video game.  ADHD is hyperactivity (over active, like running) and forgetting to do regular activities that should be done during the day.  Not writing your homework in your notepad, for example.



momgnecrzy3
by Member on Oct. 23, 2016 at 12:41 AM
This is very much a classic aspergers symptom. My son does the same thing. His is mainly he repeats what he says. As he has gotten older he hasn't stopped, he just now whispers or mouths it. A lot of people thinks it's weird but they don't understand. I don't really have ideas, just wanted to let you know you are not alone with that one. It is hard having an autistic child with ADHD my son is similar. Good luck!
MInnocent
by Member on Oct. 23, 2016 at 1:42 AM

no i greatly appreciate it thank you. i was never told what category he falls in only that he has autism. He also mouths words especially if he thinks he's in trouble for saying (whatever hemight of said because curse words do come out lol). I notice people stare and look at him like he has two heads some times and that's what i would like to prevent because even though he may not realize it now he may in the future and even if he doesn't no mother wants their child to be the center of that sort of attention. :(

kajira
by Emma on Oct. 23, 2016 at 8:02 AM
1 mom liked this

You just described stimming.

He's creating sensory to stim with, and his appears to be vocal.

Earplugs with music may help him meet his sensory needs, and not distract others if they are quiet ear buds. (make sure the sound never goes above 30% or you can damage their hearing.)

I stim by singing a lot or chewing gum... I have to be moving constantly, and I don't have ADD - but I do need the sensory input a lot of times to regulate myself. and i'm an adult. Even being told there's a time and a place won't make me be able to stop, but I can change what i do to adapt to the situation so it's less noticeable to outsiders.

Quoting MInnocent:

My husband only figured ADD/ADHD because it seems as though it happens more often when  Aiden has nothing else to do. Like if his body isn't moving his mouth has to or has to have something in his hands at all times. 


Quoting emarin77:

Pragmatic (social) therapy might help.  Telling your child he can talk to himself at a certain time or place can help too.  We do not talk to ourselves at dinner time, for example. My son talks to himself at home when he plays by himself in his room or playing a video game.  ADHD is hyperactivity (over active, like running) and forgetting to do regular activities that should be done during the day.  Not writing your homework in your notepad, for example.



perrywinkle
by Bronze Member on Oct. 23, 2016 at 9:29 AM
My son does this too. He will repeat movies or phrases. It actually helps him in speech bc he his memory is good. At home or when he is really struggling I let him do it. In a situation when I need his attention or he needs to focus, I ask him questions or start talking about something he really likes. Sometimes I have given him five more times to say "X" and we
count it down and try to move on. I get mixed results with that.
3Junebabies
by Member on Oct. 23, 2016 at 9:49 AM
1 mom liked this
My daughter is in high school and seems to do it when she has nothing else to do. Example: while sitting on the team bench during volleyball. She also paces back and forth. I think she's just bored. I'm not sure what her team thinks of it but they never bother her.
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