• In the Spotlight:
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

504 plan?

Posted by on Oct. 27, 2016 at 4:14 PM
  • 6 Replies
Does anyone's child have this in place? 'My daughter has high functioning autism and did not qualify for a iep but might be getting a 504 what's the difference?
by on Oct. 27, 2016 at 4:14 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-6):
emarin77
by Gold Member on Oct. 27, 2016 at 5:04 PM

504 Plans give modifications or accommodation's in the classroom.  Examples: This could be extended time for tests/other location for tests.  Assistance from teachers to remind students to write their homework in their notepad.

Bobcatridge
by Carol on Oct. 27, 2016 at 5:12 PM

My daughter's 504 gave extended time for testing, a private quiet place for testing, allowed to leave to a quiet place when emotionally stressed, and some assignment modifications.  Generally, the school did not do a good job of following the 504. 

SamMom912
by Platinum Member on Oct. 27, 2016 at 5:43 PM
In general, 504 plans are most appropriate when the student has a physical disability that does not directly interfere with his ability to learn. Students who require a wheelchair or auditory enhancements but who otherwise can access the educational curriculum often find that a 504 plan protects their rights well.

When a student’s disability is cognitive, emotional, intellectual or developmental, however, a 504 plan is rarely adequate. Such students usually require curriculum modifications and “specially designed instruction” that come only with an IEP.

When a student has a learning disability, developmental delay, ASD, ADD/ADHD or another condition that directly impacts learning and behavior, it is very likely she is eligible for an IEP and her parents should not accept a 504 in its place.

What is a 504 Plan?
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, a federal civil rights law, prohibits discrimination on the basis of a disability. A person with a disability is defined as having a physical or mental impairment that limits one or more major life activity, including walking, seeing, hearing and aspects of learning such as reading, writing and calculating. The law requires schools to eliminate any barriers that prevent students with such disabilities from participating fully in their education. It requires a written 504 Plan setting forth reasonable accommodations that will be made to give the child equal educational access.

What is an IEP?
The federal Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act (IDEA) provides for free and appropriate education (FAPE) services for children with disabilities in specific categories, including adaptive, cognitive, communica­tions, physical or social-emotional development.

IDEA requires that eligible students ages 3-21 receive a written individualized education program (IEP) that provides for personalized instruction in order to make meaningful progress in school at no cost to the parents. This requirement makes IDEA the most powerful law for students with special needs.

What do both provide?
Both 504 Plans and IEPs require that a school provide specially designed instruction. Both have governmental oversight to make sure that schools do what’s necessary to give eligible students access to their education. Both provide protections before a disciplinary transfer of a disabled student can take place.


IEP and 504 Plan Comparison
IEP
• Student must receive appropriate individualized instruction in order to make meaningful progress.
504
• Only requires “equal access,” not individualization; no requirement to monitor the student’s progress.
IEP
• Protects students with behavioral issues by requiring schools to perform a functional behavior assessment (FBA) and develop a positive behavioral support plan (PBSP) to teach appropriate behavior.
504
• Students must not be punished or discriminated against based on their disability, but no FBA or positive support plan is required.
IEP
• Requires a special hearing for discipline procedures to decide if the child’s disability caused the misconduct. If so, most disciplinary transfers cannot take place.
504
• Similar protections.
IEP
• Student must be re-evaluated once every three years or sooner if needed or requested by a parent or teacher.
504
• Requires a “periodic” re-evaluation but law does not specify any time frame for that evaluation.
IEP
• Requires an impartial hearing by a neutral hearing officer appointed by the state if parents disagree with the identification, evaluation or placement of the student.
504
• Provides for impartial hearing but the hearing officer is appointed by the school. Parents can file a complaint with the federal Office of Civil Rights for violations. These can be very effective.
IEP
• Parents must receive ten days notice prior to any change in educational placement.
504
• No prior notice requirement

in addition small change can be made to a 504 without parental notice. No changes can ever be made to an IEP without the team meeting to discuss & approve.


magmommy
by Silver Member on Oct. 27, 2016 at 10:57 PM
My personal experience has been this- my son, now 10 and in 5th grade, was having reading and writing and anxiety issues in 1st grade. I asked for a special ed meeting knowing he needed help but not sure what. The teacher but mainly the school counselor kind if bulldozed our thoughts and questions. She said they would do this or that just to placate me. Not knowing better I said ok.

Later, in 2nd grade he was getting headaches from the noise in the cafeteria and had trouble writing answers down even when he knew them. I had a caseworker from our psych center who came with me, knew what we could do. I asked specifically then. I wanted him to be able to have a fidget you and chew necklace for anxiety, special placement in the cafe for noise reduction. And his writing assignments be modified and/ or shorter. When I spelled it out for them and insisted it be written they fixed up the 504. I wanted them held accountable instead of just being able to cast it off or sweep the problems under the rug.

By 3rd grade he had gotten emotionally and developmentally behind enough and had been seen by the dev pediatrician so I requested in writing a formal evaluation be done for consideration of special education services. When they actually assessed him they found several areas they were able to help him with or modify for. He s had an iep since then because of his need for significant homework modification, testing assistance, excusable absences based on his anxiety stomach problems, classroom assistant, and anxiety tools he uses.

Did they do actual testing for your child to determine eligibility? What are the specific needs she has and what ways do you think the school should assist her? Having a clear picture of that will help you best advocate for her. I will say, don't let them intimidate you. Not saying teachers try (I used to be an elem school teacher myself) but it's easier for them to over look things or brush them off when you see her needs clearly.
luvnoah10
by Bronze Member on Oct. 28, 2016 at 6:54 PM

With the suggestion and encouragement from his therapist, I wanted to get a 504 plan for my ds who's 13 and in 7th grade since he struggled so much last year and this year with homework. I wanted to get some kind of accomadations for that since homework that should take an hour takes sometimes up to 4 hours but ds does not want any "special treatment" he says and " I don't want to be judged" or "I don't want to stand out". He says he wants to be treated like everyone else. Teachers say he is doing great at school. They don't see any anxiety or frustrations which is great! He has always "held it together" for school pretty much but at home is different story. The anxiety, frustrations, negative remarks, self depreciation, inattention all comes out during homework. Ugg. I try so hard to be patient with him but some days its so hard..Any suggestions would be helpful...

PaxtonKy
by Bronze Member on Oct. 30, 2016 at 12:10 AM
My son also has high functioning autism and has had an iep since pre-k last year. Why did your daughter not qualify for an iep? If you feel a 504 will accomodate her needs.. Otherwise push for an iep. For asd an iep should be the preferred educational support used by schools and almost automatic without needing to 'qualify'. SamMom912 gives great explanations of the differences between iep's and 504's in her response :)
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)