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ideas greatly needed

Posted by on Aug. 19, 2017 at 11:41 AM
  • 24 Replies

we got a new student this week & he is.........

 he is a 6yr old that was diagnosed with autism when he was 2 1/2.  though there are several supports, many free, available to families of special needs children in our area his family never got him any type of early intervention.  they registered him for kindergarten this year at his home school not letting the school know his diagnosis.  he is non verbal & a bit "feral" as he is allowed to do as he pleases at home & has no structure.  how the parents thought he could survive/thrive in a gen ed k class is beyond me.  

school started last monday & sadly it took till this wednesday to move him into our school.  gotta love bureaucracy! i have spent much of the last three days making sure he keeps his clothes on.  apparently grandma lets him run around the house naked if he feels like it because she doesn't want to make him upset.  he screeches when he is upset.  at lunch & snack he runs around trying to take food from others.  again something he is allowed to do at home.  the teacher & i can't even have our water bottles in sight because he will climb things to get to them.  if you have ever seen any helen keller movies he reminds me of how helen was before anne sullivan came into her life.

none of the teachers have had experience with a child that has had no early intervention so he is new territory for all of us.  any words of wisdom, experience, advice, other than persistence & patience would be greatly appreciated.


by on Aug. 19, 2017 at 11:41 AM
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Replies (1-10):
ineedcoffeemom
by Brittaney on Aug. 19, 2017 at 2:18 PM
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He needs his own 1:1 aide to be by his side every second of the day. That way he can be redirected from what he wants to do to what he needs to do. With that, he should be given time to do the things he wants to do, breaks from structure since it would be too overwhelming to do the whole routine at once all day every day. But he'll still need the aide to keep him in a safe area to be himself so he isn't trying to take other's things. Constant posivite reinforcement for things like keeping clothes on and doing a productive task. 

If he isn't given his own aide its going to be a long hard year and I honestly wouldn't see a lot of progress made. He doesn't know what's he's supposed to do and needs someone to show him through every moment of the day.

TigerofMu
by on Aug. 19, 2017 at 3:19 PM

Wow.  I truly feel for you.  Yep, persistence and patience are about all the wise words of wisdom I have.

Routine, routine, routine, and structure.  It's going to take some time.  Remember, Helen Keller was absolutely horrible to Anne Sullivan for a long time before she found that one thing, that connection to bridge the gap. 

Keep putting him back in the places where he should be, keep removing him from the places where he shouldn't, and just develop that consistency and routine.  Keep giving him positive attention and reinforcement, and eventually he will probably begin to follow.  Consistency and routine will make him more comfortable, help him feel safer, and you can build from there. 

Not having any of that at home is going to be the biggest downfall, because there won't be any continuance, so it will probably take twice as long.

lizzig
by Member on Aug. 19, 2017 at 5:40 PM

the teacher & ist are working on his iep now.  didn't have one at all.  they are hoping they can get 1 on 1 for him but if it does happen it won't be anytime soon since other than his diagnosis he's had no evaluations for speech, ot, pt, etc.  so it's going to be a lot of testing & such before we even get to the 1:1.

we've asked his parents & grandma (his caregiver during the day) as well as given them the forms to fill out so we will know what his motivations are, his triggers, etc. as of yet the haven't turned in the paperwork or responded to emails.

Quoting ineedcoffeemom:

He needs his own 1:1 aide to be by his side every second of the day. That way he can be redirected from what he wants to do to what he needs to do. With that, he should be given time to do the things he wants to do, breaks from structure since it would be too overwhelming to do the whole routine at once all day every day. But he'll still need the aide to keep him in a safe area to be himself so he isn't trying to take other's things. Constant posivite reinforcement for things like keeping clothes on and doing a productive task. 

If he isn't given his own aide its going to be a long hard year and I honestly wouldn't see a lot of progress made. He doesn't know what's he's supposed to do and needs someone to show him through every moment of the day.


lizzig
by Member on Aug. 19, 2017 at 5:42 PM
1 mom liked this

that is the biggest frustration with my job.  not the children but the parents that aren't willing to follow through with what we are doing at school, especially when they ask for our help with certain things, like potty training.

Quoting TigerofMu:

Wow.  I truly feel for you.  Yep, persistence and patience are about all the wise words of wisdom I have.

Routine, routine, routine, and structure.  It's going to take some time.  Remember, Helen Keller was absolutely horrible to Anne Sullivan for a long time before she found that one thing, that connection to bridge the gap. 

Keep putting him back in the places where he should be, keep removing him from the places where he shouldn't, and just develop that consistency and routine.  Keep giving him positive attention and reinforcement, and eventually he will probably begin to follow.  Consistency and routine will make him more comfortable, help him feel safer, and you can build from there. 

Not having any of that at home is going to be the biggest downfall, because there won't be any continuance, so it will probably take twice as long.


patnic
by Bronze Member on Aug. 19, 2017 at 7:45 PM

Yikes.  I'd go back to basics.  Pictures, picture schedules, social stories.  Rewards for following rules - something quick, like a gummy or piece of fruit.  I'd be very scared that he might run off during lunch or when someone looks away.

TigerofMu
by on Aug. 19, 2017 at 8:57 PM

That is so true.  It's the toughest thing when we need to be the parents too and they go home and unlearn everything we've been working toward in the classroom.

Quoting lizzig:

that is the biggest frustration with my job.  not the children but the parents that aren't willing to follow through with what we are doing at school, especially when they ask for our help with certain things, like potty training.

Quoting TigerofMu:

Wow.  I truly feel for you.  Yep, persistence and patience are about all the wise words of wisdom I have.

Routine, routine, routine, and structure.  It's going to take some time.  Remember, Helen Keller was absolutely horrible to Anne Sullivan for a long time before she found that one thing, that connection to bridge the gap. 

Keep putting him back in the places where he should be, keep removing him from the places where he shouldn't, and just develop that consistency and routine.  Keep giving him positive attention and reinforcement, and eventually he will probably begin to follow.  Consistency and routine will make him more comfortable, help him feel safer, and you can build from there. 

Not having any of that at home is going to be the biggest downfall, because there won't be any continuance, so it will probably take twice as long.


lizzig
by Member on Aug. 20, 2017 at 11:11 AM

it's rough!  for as big as he is, he's 6 & bigger than some of our 8yr olds, he's mighty quick!

thankfully they finally fenced in the one side of the playground so now we only have to worry about the one end with stairs.  much easier at recess for our runners.

Quoting patnic:

Yikes.  I'd go back to basics.  Pictures, picture schedules, social stories.  Rewards for following rules - something quick, like a gummy or piece of fruit.  I'd be very scared that he might run off during lunch or when someone looks away.


mamamedic69
by Bronze Member on Aug. 20, 2017 at 9:32 PM

Wow!!! That is a lot for anyone to deal with. It saddens me that his parents didn't do anything for him. Just be consistent andd on't back down.....EVER! 

SamMom912
by Platinum Member on Aug. 21, 2017 at 10:12 AM
Not sure what the deal with the parents are but Im not one to judge. Maybe they know nothing about Autism or difference and got no guidance from anyone. Maybe they are overwhelmed and honestly didnt know where to start. Maybe everyone told them "he would grow out of it." "Boys will be boys".
Sad that their pediatrician didnt send them to Early Intervention and that at 5/6 its the FIRST time he is getting help.

I'd advocate at your SpEd dept that at this point (not wearing clothing??? Or has that changed?) running, being unsafe, its an injustice to this child not not have him in the most restrictive environment available to help him catch up if he can.

He sounds like more than just a few hrs a day will help him.
mrswillie
by Member on Aug. 23, 2017 at 10:56 AM
He can learn, it will just take time and patience. You just described my grandson years ago, and while he may be allowed to do things at home, he will learn rules are different at school. (Just an fyi... no clothes is probably a sensory issue. My grandson is 9 and hates clothes.He has learned to stay dressed at school, but we know what he likes)

I agree with a 1:1 aid. My grandson has had one for years. She is with him from the time he gets on the bus to the time he is off.

Right now, you need to chose your battles. Work on one thing at a time. The communication will be key weather it be sign language or PECS. He is probably just as frustrated as you. Can you imagine not being able to tell anyone your wants or needs.
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