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Thrill rides as sensory experiences?

Posted by on Dec. 29, 2017 at 8:31 PM
  • 3 Replies
Roller coasters for the sensory seekers, pools for the sensory avoiders? How do your kids respond to these sorts of things? Do they want to go on every ride at the carnival or want to avoid them? Do they enjoy going in the pool or like to swim underwater or hate the water? Do they like strong tasting foods or prefer more blander tastes? Do they avoid touch or like the strong pressures of bear hugs?
by on Dec. 29, 2017 at 8:31 PM
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Replies (1-3):
emarin77
by Gold Member on Dec. 30, 2017 at 10:03 AM

My son likes going on all kinds of rides and the pool. He enjoyed swimming class this winter.  No hot spices like me and his father.  When my son was age 4 and below  he had issues with touch but he grew out of it, he is 9 now.

SamMom912
by Platinum Member on Dec. 30, 2017 at 2:19 PM
Sam likes the heavy proprioceptive input provided by the G force on roller coasters. Sam likes the vestibular input provided by the twists, turns, and spinning.
He likes the Proprioceptive input provided by the water pushing against his body- (especially in deep water)

Sam has poor oral motor skills with poor muscle tone. He needs high taste foods and typically over stuffs his mouth a bit to actually “feel” whats in there to chew and move the food around.
Imagine a small piece of squishy mushy french fried potato not giving your mouth to brain the information its there, without a dip of salty ketchup.

Sam likes any touch from me or his Dad. He finds a weighted blanket (heavy Proprioceptive) relaxing. He finds hugs just nice.
He does not tolerate touch (hugs) from people he doesn’t know (or know well or like) so high 5s relieve him of that “intamacy” required for touch. This is not based at all as sensory avoidace.

Sensory avoidance cones more in with noisy places or visually chaotic places.

He has difficulty knowing where his body ends and the world begins- so he will hold his arm out walking down a hallway- (like a blind person) to tell him “where” he is. He will snuggle up next to me on the couch (and accidentally sit ON MY side- like too close pressing against me) because he really doesn’t get where he “ends”.

Long sleeves, long pants, tight clothing- all help him “feel” his limbs. So transitioning to shorts/short sleeves was always hard. At 11, thats easy now.
MixedCooke
by Group Admin on Dec. 30, 2017 at 7:18 PM
1 mom liked this
Yeah Samara LOVES rollercoasters and kept choosing the craziest rides but she was still too short for them or she would’ve gone on them.

Quoting SamMom912: Sam likes the heavy proprioceptive input provided by the G force on roller coasters. Sam likes the vestibular input provided by the twists, turns, and spinning.
He likes the Proprioceptive input provided by the water pushing against his body- (especially in deep water)

Sam has poor oral motor skills with poor muscle tone. He needs high taste foods and typically over stuffs his mouth a bit to actually “feel” whats in there to chew and move the food around.
Imagine a small piece of squishy mushy french fried potato not giving your mouth to brain the information its there, without a dip of salty ketchup.

Sam likes any touch from me or his Dad. He finds a weighted blanket (heavy Proprioceptive) relaxing. He finds hugs just nice.
He does not tolerate touch (hugs) from people he doesn’t know (or know well or like) so high 5s relieve him of that “intamacy” required for touch. This is not based at all as sensory avoidace.

Sensory avoidance cones more in with noisy places or visually chaotic places.

He has difficulty knowing where his body ends and the world begins- so he will hold his arm out walking down a hallway- (like a blind person) to tell him “where” he is. He will snuggle up next to me on the couch (and accidentally sit ON MY side- like too close pressing against me) because he really doesn’t get where he “ends”.

Long sleeves, long pants, tight clothing- all help him “feel” his limbs. So transitioning to shorts/short sleeves was always hard. At 11, thats easy now.
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