Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Craft Cafe Craft Cafe

How do you decide on how much to charge (crochet/knitting)?

Posted by on Nov. 19, 2012 at 11:53 PM
  • 9 Replies
1 mom liked this

 For those of you who sell your crochet/knitting work, how did you decide on your pricing? I did a craft show recently and did REALLY well. Much better than I had expected to. It was a small show in a churches basement and I ended up selling out before the show was over. The problem is, everyone I know insists I am under pricing my work. The way I have priced my work is, I doubled my supply costs. Actually, I more than doubled my costs on many of the items. This hat for example: I was able to make 8 hats w/ the yarn and buttons I purchased for $14.  I charged $10ea for a profit of about $66 for that particular lot or $8.25ea hat.

Then there is this one (the red).  It's made from  cotton. I was able to make 4 of them for $3 (I found the yarn on clearance and happened to have a coupon to stack on the clearance, pure luck w/that one. Retail would have been $9 which still would have left me w/ a profit at $10ea). I charged $10 each for those as well. So a profit of $37 or $9.25 ea .These were just 2 of the items I had at the show, and 2 of the most profitable items. But all in all I charged a minimum of double what I spent to make the item (the craft show fee was only $45. Which I did take into account).

Anyway, after checking a few sites I noticed many of my items were under priced. I was actually surprised at how under priced they were. Things I was selling for $10 other 'home made' sites are selling similar items for $25-$35 plus shipping. Is there a better way to calculate my prices. I want to be reasonable, but I don't want to 'lose out' on to much money.....even if I can 'afford' to. Any thoughts/opinions?

by on Nov. 19, 2012 at 11:53 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-9):
Paperfishies
by on Nov. 19, 2012 at 11:56 PM
You also want to factor in an hourly rate. So if you have 3 hours in a project, you want to make sure you're paid for each hour.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
melliburger
by Melli on Nov. 19, 2012 at 11:58 PM

There are so many different methods to pricing. What do you feel comfortable charging? Would you pay that amount for an identical item? Another good point, if you want to remake a particular hat,but have to buy the next yarn at full price, you would have to charge more, so make sure to factor in the entire price of the yarn or supplies .

Miranda1127
by Member on Nov. 20, 2012 at 12:03 AM

 how much per hour? Most of the hat's I do only take about an hour to crochet and 20mins or so to sew on the accent pieces (faces, etc), so I could easily add a decent hourly rate to those. But then I have things like sweaters and blankets that take 5+ hours to make. How likely am I to sell a 10hr blanket for $50 ($5hr)+ materials (depending on the blanket they can get a bit pricey)? Does the hourly rate change w/ the item?

Quoting Paperfishies:

You also want to factor in an hourly rate. So if you have 3 hours in a project, you want to make sure you're paid for each hour.

 

Miranda1127
by Member on Nov. 20, 2012 at 12:04 AM

 I think that is part of the problem. I take frugality to an extreme. I'm beginning to think I'm pricing my things at what I would pay not what the avg consumer would pay.

Quoting melliburger:

There are so many different methods to pricing. What do you feel comfortable charging? Would you pay that amount for an identical item? Another good point, if you want to remake a particular hat,but have to buy the next yarn at full price, you would have to charge more, so make sure to factor in the entire price of the yarn or supplies .

 

mama_girl07
by Silver Member on Nov. 20, 2012 at 12:04 AM

Most of what I charge is basically how long it takes to make. I charge 12 for infant/baby hats, 15 for child hats, and 18 for adult hats. They were higher for awhile but i didnt start selling anything until I lowered them a bit and jsut about everyone who has bought them has told me I should be charging more. Maybe after I get established i will charge mroe but I jsut started selling a few months ago.

annasew
by on Nov. 20, 2012 at 10:37 AM

I take what I have in materials and divide over however many I get out of it.   I then charge between 5 and 10 bucks an hour depending on the project.   Like wool applique is 10 an hour because it is all hand pieced and sewn but my quilts are 5 bucks an hour because I machine do those. 

black.eyeliner
by on Nov. 20, 2012 at 10:40 AM
Keep in mind that you should charge for the going rate of the yarn in store. Not the clearance or sale price.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
jrobertson20
by on Nov. 20, 2012 at 10:48 AM

I go on Etsy and other websites and compare prices for whatever hat I'm doing to see what about they are being sold for. 

The_Monster_Mom
by Emerald Member on Nov. 25, 2012 at 6:30 PM

I am told all the time that I am underpriced - but by lowering my overheads, I am able to charge less but make more, if that makes sense. :)

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN