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What do you do for 1st Grade??

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so, i am looking at curriculums and thinking of next year..my youngest will be in 1st grade and i wanna be prepared..  I am not sure yet what curriculum i want or should use with him.. what subjects do you cover in 1st grade?? any curriculum suggestions??  I want to make sure i cover enough material with him but i don't want to overwhelm him either or make it too simple.. make sense??  lol  he also really struggles with writing so i want to help him in that department.. do you cover every subject every day?? or alternate science and social studies/history???  we have taken it easy this year mostly focusing on phonics and some math and reading... right now we are using the begining books for Explode the Code (the ready set and go books) and a workbook for some math... and just reading books, leapfrog movies.. and also http://www.readingkingdom.com/ he also helps with cooking and and just life learning too..

I am a single momma and can't afford an expensivie curriculum, but can buy a little at a time to get ready for next year.. I am so open to suggestions and would love to know how you do/did 1st grade.. what curric did you use??  how did you schedule your day?? anything else helpful would be great too...

Christian Homeschooling Mamma to two wonderful, busy, animal loving boys... Mario, 18yrs, and Isaiah, 6yrs




Check out my blog:    http://ourcrazyhomeschoollife.blogspot.com/

by on May. 9, 2011 at 12:14 AM
Replies (11-18):
ElectraSpy
by on May. 20, 2011 at 1:31 PM
Just a fun add for 1st grade, I discovered this looking for portable school for over Spring Break (my kids want school everyday, even if it's vacation) These inch thick workbooks are sold at Target ($11) they are called BrainQuest and the offer them pre-k thru 4th. They cover phonics, spelling, vocabulary, lang arts, reading, writing, sequencing, math, measurment, time, money, social studies & science!!! $11
My kids love them and work in them outside of our school time, for fun. (they are very colorful with easy to follow directions)
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PandoraRobin
by on May. 22, 2011 at 3:23 PM

We are finishing up first grade. We use a virtual school but I also supplement as needed. Each summer I write a homeschool plan in case we move to an area not covered by our virual school. I use World Book course of study, http://www.worldbook.com/typical-course-of-study.html , to write my plan. I search the internet for ideas and free printables. All printables and activity sheets are saved on to a flash drive kept just for school papers. I also separate them into folders by subject. Then I just print what I need when I need it.  Also check out Comprehensive Curriculum of Basic Skills workbooks. I use these to supplement and keep up learning over the summer and school breaks. The Comprehensive Curriculum of Basic Skills table of contents can be viewed online on amazon.com that can give you an overview of what they need to know. A lot of workbooks go on sale at the end of the school year to make room for the new stuff so keep an eye out. Good luck.

MrsM121
by on May. 22, 2011 at 4:39 PM

I would check out the local libraries if you have one close by.  My first year homeschooling my boys (then 3rd and 1st grade) was done entirely from library books and online worksheets.  I'm pretty eclectic in what we do and the methods we use but I like the complete curriculum books for bare bones worksheets and I use the Core Knowledge Curriculum for an overall direction on what to teach. 

We still don't do every subject, everyday of the week.  Sometimes my kids are just really not into a subject at the time and forcing it will get me and them nowhere fast.

TroyboysMom
by on May. 22, 2011 at 9:20 PM

This is what we did for first grade:

Language Arts/Reading:

-We did a lot of just plain reading. Some reading for knowledge, and some reading for pleasure, and we talked about the difference, and how the two can be combined, also. We read through different poets, and talked about what we liked and didn't like, and wrote couplets, haikus, and name poems. Poetry was a great way to talk about the differences between metaphors and similes, and to talk about onomatopaeia and the different kinds of rhyme.

     -Reading for knowledge: we talked about library skills, how to use to library, looking up books, the Dewey    

     decimal system, etc. We talked about doing research on the internet, and what were reputable sources of information.

-Grammar: we covered ending punctuation (period, exclamation point, and question mark), and covered the use of commas, apostrophes, and colons (for use in lists only.). We also learned about paragraphs, indents, and spacing. We also covered the eight basic parts of speech, and how to use them to make our writing appeal to our audience (We talked a little bit about writing to our audience, but not a whole lot.). We wrote summaries and book reports and journaled (I found a list of journal prompts online, and we use those or find something else to write about.)

- Spelling: we worked through the 250 most commonly used words/Dolch words.

-Writing: we use Zaner-Bloser as a base.

 - - - - -

Geography/History: We did some basic U.S. History, briefly touched on the presidents (spending more time on Washington, Lincoln, Obama, and a couple others), and iconic American figures. We concentrated on the U.S., covering two states a week, and covering our map with "Interesting facts." We also spent time playing Great States, Jr. and Great States to prompt interest and learning. We spent a lot of time around the holidays looking at different countries, and plotting them on the map, and figuring out the distances (Map reading).We also looked briefly at Europe and Asia, and did a "Month of Food," where we learned about different countries and cultures, and tried the different foods they offered. We talked about the people in our community and briefly talked about the levels of government (from city level to state to federal.).

- - - - -

Mathematics

We covered: addition (to double digit with carrying), subtraction (double digit with borrowing); greater than/less than; place value, basic equations, basic fractions (pizza is wonderful for this!), basic measurements. I basically followed his lead, though, and when he was ready to move on, we did.

Science

-We covered: different types of habitats (We live right near the Safari Park, so this was a wonderful field trip), states of matter, the solar system and astronomy, types of weather, and the human body.

Physical Education

-We have soccer (two practices and a game a week), and tumbling (one day a week).

Music

-We learn about one classical composer a month, with a little bit each week, with related activities and musical pieces.

I think that's everything.

---

ETA: Foreign Language

-We use Signing Time (and our own family) to work on true ASL. We have done French in fits and starts. It keeps falling by the wayside with the other things. Hopefully I'll find a way to make it all work together in the fall.


If you have used bookstores in your area, they are FANTASTIC for picking things up at. I found a whole mess of workbooks (an entire bookshelf and a half) at ours, and they were marked down to .25/ea. I really should check out dollar tree!

We also have a large easel style whiteboard, a whiteboard on the wall, and individual white boards for working on things. We also have a laptop for school use, for some programs we run for different things.


-

I love the Core Knowledge books! They're great. We'll definitely be using those in the future!


buzymom93
by on May. 25, 2011 at 4:33 PM

Thank you guys so so much for all the advice.. here is what i have so far:

Explode the Code

Bob Books for reading

Miquon Math

Explorer Bible Study for Bible

I really want to do God's Design for Life for Science but its kinda spendy so i might do Christian Kids Explore Earth and Panets

for history I am stuck between Story of the World and Mistery of History

i was thinking of doing some journaling for writing practice maybe a nature journal...

not sure what else i should add or if i should add anything or how i am gonna fit it all together... 

right now we are working on the explode the code beginner books and are almost done with the second one.. and a math workbook and reading some books... its pretty light...

SimplySonita
by on May. 26, 2011 at 9:29 AM

I think that's plenty for 1st grade.

At that young age I think about an hour a day of 'table work' is plenty!

Quoting buzymom93:

Thank you guys so so much for all the advice.. here is what i have so far:

Explode the Code

Bob Books for reading

Miquon Math

Explorer Bible Study for Bible

I really want to do God's Design for Life for Science but its kinda spendy so i might do Christian Kids Explore Earth and Panets

for history I am stuck between Story of the World and Mistery of History

i was thinking of doing some journaling for writing practice maybe a nature journal...

not sure what else i should add or if i should add anything or how i am gonna fit it all together... 

right now we are working on the explode the code beginner books and are almost done with the second one.. and a math workbook and reading some books... its pretty light...


Sonita-Homeschooling mama to Ephram (7) & Malachi (4)



KDBeckham
by on May. 26, 2011 at 9:52 AM

I will have a 1st grader this year and it was fun reading what everyone else is or was using...I think I'm pretty simply here's what I've got so far:

Reading/Phonics: Hooked on Phonics for 1st grade with supplement readers from the library

Math: Math U See - Alpha

Art: (this kid loves art) we will actually just do what ever he wants, he loves to draw, paint and anything else art related, he wants to visit the State art museum so we will do that and get lots of books from the library

P.E. - no a requirement in our state but I will be giving them plenty of time at the Y and he will be in sports come the spring

Science and History: Unit Studies, he has shown interest in several topics and I will take those topics and create, using info from the library and internet

Writing: a free website I found abcteach has some great info and free printables on it...A doesn't have a hard time with writing so this will be fairly simply just practicing

Music: He's not into music that much...we may do a little research into music (public school ruined it for him, he complained that all they did was jazz music and that's just not his cup of tea)

 

Friday's for us will be all about field trips and errands...we are going to do a lot of travel and I have already decided to make it a bi-monthly visit to one of our local nursing homes to have the children visit with the elderly. We are also going to get active in the local boys and girls club.

ReagansMom.Com
by on May. 26, 2011 at 1:35 PM

Hi buzymom93,

These are wonderful responses and lists of resources!  I recently completed homeschooling two children birth through 12th with dual enrollment in college.  The first graduated summa cum laude in Business Finance.  The second is a rising senior honor student playing college tennis.  (They did the work, not me!)

Free advice:  make it fun.  As a certified teacher who "retired" to homeschool her own children, I purchased Alpha Omega Lifepacks each year K - 12.  My focus was the "scope and sequence", the order in which concepts are introduced and reintroduced throughout K - 12.  I especially enjoyed the phonics pages of pictures to identify "ch", "sh", etc.  You can make these!

Consider your "map" and your "destination" and enjoy the journey...ours was college.  It is never too early to check out collegeboard.com to see your "goal"...mainly speed, test taking skills, reading comprehension, math, and science in the ACT.  The PSAT, taken the Junior year, is the most advanced test.

I currently tutor math for two families:  a junior in high school and a fourth grader.  Do your child a favor and begin learning to count by twos, threes, fours, etc. now.  Not all in one week, of course!  By the third grade your child will learn his multiplication facts quickly.  (This is an Alpha Omega activity in the early grades)  June is a great month to count by sixes:  6, 12, 18, ... to 90.  Use muffin tins to find sixes, army men or cars are fun in the muffin tins, be creative.  July is a fun month for sevens.

I am thrilled at the many, many great suggestions here on CafeMom.Com.  I am here to encourage homeschooling parents!

Best Wishes,

ReagansMom@ReagansMom.Com

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