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Posted by on Jun. 30, 2011 at 10:16 AM
  • 11 Replies

HI I'm susan and I'm the mom to a 2 and 3 yr old (almost 4). I would like to teach the preschool at home but do not know where to start? Where can I get a curriculum that isnt too exensive? WHat advice do you have for me? THanks in advance!

by on Jun. 30, 2011 at 10:16 AM
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Replies (1-10):
MedicMommy
by on Jun. 30, 2011 at 10:59 AM

 Learn through play! That's really the only "curriculum" you need.

Wyatt learned a lot of phonics watching SuperWhy and playing on www.starfall.net

oredeb
by debbie on Jun. 30, 2011 at 11:40 AM

 welcome susan!!!

as medic mom suggested  by playing is a great way to learn at this age. running jumping dancing singing playing thats what i did with my kids! we started with art stuff, scribbliing on large paper(didnt have to stay in lines), painting on large paper, chalk on a board, letters and number on the frig, i read to them a lot, taught them songs, nature hikes to the back pasture, we looked at bugs, music- bring in some simple music insturments you can make, kept some in jars, talked about them, cooked, etc! just those everyday things you do will get you going!

you can point out different colors to them, but just remember its ok if they dont remember! they will get it eventually!

Susan0805
by on Jun. 30, 2011 at 5:15 PM

Thanks ladies, I guess preschool isnt that demanding, I just want to get a heads up on their learning. Thanks for the suggestions.

JoyfulMommyof2
by on Jul. 1, 2011 at 1:39 PM

Don't sweat it!  At this age, just make learning fun!!  This gives them the right frame of mind to start with.  Basically, they just need to learn the fundamentals.  (I know some moms, and I say this respectfully, like to brag about how much their little ones know at such an early age.  "Little Johnny started reading when he was only four years old!"  Well, that's great for little Johnny, but it doesn't really matter.  Little Susie, who didn't start reading until she was seven, will be able to read just as well even though she started later.)  Use lego blocks or something similar.  Teach them to count the blocks.  Teach them to identify the colors of the blocks.  Teach them to put the blocks in a stack with a pattern (i.e. red, blue, green, red, blue, green).  Take one out of the pattern, and have them tell you which is missing.   Have them hand you a certain number of blocks and count them as they hand them to you.  Play "treasure hunt" and tell them to bring you one green and one blue toy from the toy box, or one yellow flower and one red flower from outside.  Go on walks and play "I Spy."  Play the "Alphabet Game."  I also find that kids can learn almost anything that you put to music.  Make up songs to spell their names, to learn their address and phone numbers, etc.  Writing?  Use sidewalk chalk and teach them their shapes and alphabets and spelling of their names.  They also love "messy" things like paint and markers (washable).  Let them paint their shapes and shapes of alphabets.  Chalk to paintbrush also improves their dexterity.  The possibilities are endless!!!  Not sure what you should be teaching them?  You can always go to a curriculum source (such as ABeka.com) and look at their scope and sequence for that age or grade.  Then just come up with fun ways to teach it.  Your children then learn and enjoy learning, and you've become the "coolest mom in the world" because you spend so much quality time with them.  Most importantly, read to them!  Reading opens up their minds and imaginations.  Have a field trip and go to the library.  Let them choose the books with you.  Pack a picnic lunch and a blanket, then go to the park with your books and read to them. Make reading a night time ritual before prayer time!  We've been doing this since my daughter was three; now she's 12 and still enjoys being my reading to her (Nancy Drew books, at this time).  Don't worry.  You have made the best decision possible and anything you might "miss" can be caught up quite easily.  Enjoy!  

JoyfulMommyof2


busy mom

LindaClement
by on Jul. 1, 2011 at 1:49 PM

I'd recommend the book The Mother's Almanac. It has some great ideas for crafts and experiments and projects that little kids can participate in, along with a genuinely respectful view of children's innate humanity.

Otherwise, I'd stay away from 'curriculum' specifically --partly because it tends to be very poorly written, and partly because it's for moving children around in large groups, not individual education.

Talk to your child. Discuss what you see, what's happening around you, what you wonder about and what's different this week. 

And, relax: you have almost 2 whole decades to complete what would take the average 16yo about 6 months to complete. No rush required.

Boobah
by Nikki :) on Jul. 1, 2011 at 3:58 PM
I love this last paragraph. :)

Quoting LindaClement:

I'd recommend the book The Mother's Almanac. It has some great ideas for crafts and experiments and projects that little kids can participate in, along with a genuinely respectful view of children's innate humanity.


Otherwise, I'd stay away from 'curriculum' specifically --partly because it tends to be very poorly written, and partly because it's for moving children around in large groups, not individual education.


Talk to your child. Discuss what you see, what's happening around you, what you wonder about and what's different this week. 


And, relax: you have almost 2 whole decades to complete what would take the average 16yo about 6 months to complete. No rush required.

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AbundanceMagnet
by on Jul. 2, 2011 at 7:36 AM

Great suggestions here!!!  My advice would be to take time getting to know how your children like to learn... make it fun and enjoyable.. enjoy them!  Btw Welcome to the group!!!! :)  This is an awesome bunch of ladies!!!

SimplySonita
by on Jul. 3, 2011 at 12:07 AM

Agreed, play is the best way for young children to learn.

Also ask them questions and always answer theirs!

Pay attention to what they are into and offer them lots of oppurtunity to explore that.

MommaTasha1003
by on Jul. 3, 2011 at 11:32 PM

agree to above..

And try to stay tuned in to what they are interested in... And then help them explore it! If a child is interested in writing (my dd led us in her learning to write @ 3yo) do what you can to help - lots of paper, magna doodles & such... Frequent the library for new books.. Go to story time @ the library. Visit zoos/ museums/ other local learning places often (memberships are not that much).. explore nature, turn over large rocks to find bugs.

If you would like some "guide" for yourself do a letter of the week type thing. (letteroftheweek.com)

Every week focus on a number, letter, shape: Letter A- read about alligators, eat apples (craft with apples: cut in 1/2 dip in paint- makes a star!) Search for the letter A in books/ at stores or the #1.. Do a circle craft (snowman).. search for circles in your house..

You should be having fun & so should they. Its important they learn education is fun/exciting/adventurous.. Not dull. hard & boring :-)

LindaClement
by on Jul. 4, 2011 at 5:35 PM

I agree with all of the above: enjoy your children, it's so much more important than whatever's in style right now in the way of Early Childhood Education.

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