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Do you know of a history curriculum like this?

Posted by on Jun. 30, 2011 at 8:31 PM
  • 2 Replies

Hi all,

History seems so segmented the way it is taught in regular school. What I would like is a whole Earth approach...like we base the history around the year and find out what is going on around the globe.

Much of American history is influenced by what happened in England and Europe, for that matter, and you cannot get a good grasp of history in general without studying the older centuries before our younger "America" ones.

Plus, I never realized how barbaric the "barbarians" truly were until I read a book about Ghenghis Khan - super fascinating btw! - and I had to keep reminding myself that other nations were so much more advanced at that same time.

Anyway, what do you think of this approach? Any curricula like this, or do I make my own?


by on Jun. 30, 2011 at 8:31 PM
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swim-mom72
by on Jun. 30, 2011 at 10:01 PM

What you are describing is more of a "whole books" approach to learning history, which comes from the Charlotte Mason style of teaching. There is quite a bit out there that would fit the bill. I am going to name a few that either we have used, researched, or heard about: Winter's Promise, Sonlight, Beautiful Feet, Mystery of History(if you get many of the suggested resources to go along with the main text), SOTW(kinda like Mystery of History with using the suggested resources in the activity guide and is used in some of the Sonlight cores), Queens has some, and My Father's World.

I am sure there are many others, but like I said, these are the ones I am familiar with.

The main idea of this approach is to have a main history "spine" and to build on that spine, or compliment the spine with biographies, atlases, encyclopedias, chapter books, whole books, and any other reference appropriate for that level to go along with the time period being studied.

romacox
by Silver Member on Jul. 2, 2011 at 5:14 AM

There is much of American history that has been distorted or totally left out in modern text books.  Researching the early documents and textbooks is what I am now doing.  Did you know: In the 1800's we had black representatives in Congress, and that Ben Franklin was part of the "underground railroad" freeing slaves?  

One of the books I am reading now was written by Justice Joseph Story.  He was Justice of the Supreme Court from1811 to 1845, born 3 years after the declaration of independence, and his father fought in the American Revolution.  I am learning so much that I was never taught in modern school textbooks.

As I learn from these documents, I am sharing the information for free on line at the following link:

http://educators-space.blogspot.com/p/sight-map-of-articles.html  (scroll down to "Teaching The Constitution And American History."

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