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Teaching the letter/sound correspondence in words PIOG

Posted by on Sep. 11, 2011 at 6:39 PM
  • 16 Replies

My 4 yr old knows and understands that each letter has its own sound and can write many words. She play with sounds and words and rhymes, etc. I am working on teaching her the concepts beyond that to teach reading and writing. She does ok with writing when she and I are working together and she is telling me what sounds she hears, etc but the reading is a bit lost on her. She identifies the individual letters and their sounds but the blending is tough. She generally inserts a few extra letters/sounds and makes up another word. I am thinking word families might help her with this a bit but that still identifies a group of letters together and adding one or two to the beginning, etc so I am not sure. Any tips? She wants to and gets excited when we work on it and I think that is part of it... she is too excited and moves too quickly.  I am trying to come up with a way to help her more with this and get her solid with the concept... once she gets that, she is just going to take off with reading and she is so excited about it but we have this hump... Thanks!

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by on Sep. 11, 2011 at 6:39 PM
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Replies (1-10):
AbundanceMagnet
by on Sep. 11, 2011 at 7:17 PM

Have you considered the BOB books?  They work in steps starting out very small.  Here is a link....

http://www.bobbooks.com/

mem82
by Platinum Member on Sep. 11, 2011 at 7:35 PM

We're working on the same stuff in our house so I'm battling right there with you. 8) The only thing I've learned is to make sure your child isn't adding 'aah' at the end of each letter. Cole was saying 'Pah' for P instead of just the 'p' sound which is 'ppppph'. Same thing for other letters. It made sounding out words hard for him. Pod became pa-oo-da because he was adding that 'aah' sound at the end of so many letters.

mem82
by Platinum Member on Sep. 11, 2011 at 7:35 PM

Oh, Starfall.com is excellent and free. 8)

Lynette
by Member on Sep. 11, 2011 at 7:37 PM

there is a bk that is only $4 new A Home Start in Reading (Grades K-3) by Ruth Beechick.  It's great for tips like this. 

Mom71307
by on Sep. 11, 2011 at 7:47 PM

She does fine with that, I have been VERY careful with not adding them myself so she doesn't either... she hasn't heard it added. Anyway.... I am glad I am not alone and I may try starfall!

Quoting mem82:

We're working on the same stuff in our house so I'm battling right there with you. 8) The only thing I've learned is to make sure your child isn't adding 'aah' at the end of each letter. Cole was saying 'Pah' for P instead of just the 'p' sound which is 'ppppph'. Same thing for other letters. It made sounding out words hard for him. Pod became pa-oo-da because he was adding that 'aah' sound at the end of so many letters.


Lilypie - Personal pictureLilypie Breastfeeding tickersBreastfeeding tickers" />
wright1212
by on Sep. 12, 2011 at 9:07 AM

 First dont worry too much, she is only 4. BUT site words are a tricky matter you could try. Just a few basics. You dont teach sounds in site words, just the word as a whole with a few letter blends. TH...the, this, that, there, they. am, are, is, at, on, of. This is the 1 skills I think flash cards are really great for.

Another thing I did when I tutored was the SLIDE. I had letter tiles (could do paper tiles) that say I taught them at..AT was waiting at the bottom of the slide, repeat a few times. Then B went up the slide B, B, B (say the sound it makes)...BBBBB ATTTT. BAT. Does that make sense? Its hard to explain by writing it. But we would do that with lots of sounds and letters. I actually drew a little slide on paper (easy with clipart now) and they would have it climb up saying that sound and slide into the other sound.

oredeb
by debbie on Sep. 12, 2011 at 11:48 AM

 some of my kids did that at first, i just kept practicing with them each day for 10-15 min. i made up my own little books to use. and my own letters on index cards so they could see each letter separate and then i'd put the next letter down and the next

No_Difference
by Silver Member on Sep. 12, 2011 at 11:53 AM

 star fall which was mentioned before is great. Leap Frog Talking Words Factory may help.... We broke our words down to the individual letters...starting small...sticking with word families... and then would say the sounds faster and faster till they blended together to make the word. For instance CAT would be 'C'- 'A' - 'T'. then emphasizing 'A-T' is 'AT'. Then adding the 'C' back in faster til 'CAT' comes all together.  I hope that made sense.... Then we would move on to another "at" word  like MAT or SAT etc.

Mom71307
by on Sep. 12, 2011 at 12:47 PM

Anyone remember when the monsters on sesame street used to do "h--------ot"? I LOVED that! Anyway, that is how we have been working on it but I like the individual letter cards deal... I will make cards during nap!

romacox
by Silver Member on Sep. 13, 2011 at 6:54 AM

It may  simply be that she is not quite ready, and in that case, it is a matter of patience.  However if a child knows all their phonic sounds, but is having trouble blending them to form words, it is very often because they are enunciating some of the sounds incorrectly.

For example: If they pronounce the letter d as du they sound it out as du-a-du-y making it hard for them to hear daddy.  It does not effect all children, but does many.  This video explains:


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