Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

Feeling certain my kids are getting a better education.

Posted by on Sep. 25, 2011 at 1:32 PM
  • 8 Replies

I watch 3 kids that live in my neighborhood. I put them on and get them off the bus during the week and help them with their homework. The kids are in 1st, 2nd, and 3rd grade. My kids would have been in Kindergarten and 1st grade this year if they had attended school.

Helping these kids with their homework makes me certain that my kids are getting a better and more rounded education. The 2nd grader didn't know what vowels were, the 3rd grader can not do simple addition without the use of her fingers, I'm talking 8+2 kind of addition and the 1st grader is so stressed out that he throws serious tantrums over everything.

If I ever doubted my ability to home-school my kids, I don't anymore.

Anyone else have experiences like this? You take one look at the kids going to the school your kids would be attending and think to yourself "Thank goodness we home-school"?

Join me in Moms for Education
Moms for Education

"Oppression of spirit is not on
the public school curriculum. Rather, it's a noxious by-product produced
while stewing schooling in a pot w/ unions, administrators,
multi-billion dollar budgets, state education departments, and school
boards, then letting politicians control the heat." Linda Dobson

"When you want to teach
children to think, you begin by treating them seriously when they are
little, giving them responsibilities, talking to them candidly,
providing privacy and solitude for them, and making them readers and
thinkers of significant thoughts from the beginning. That's *if* you
want to teach them to think." ~ Bertrand Russell

by on Sep. 25, 2011 at 1:32 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-8):
alexsmomaubrys2
by on Sep. 25, 2011 at 1:32 PM

BUMP!

momversuswild
by on Sep. 25, 2011 at 6:43 PM

My self assurance came by way of standardized tests.  We have to do them here, beginning in third grade and then every three years thereafter.  My kids ACE them.

alexsmomaubrys2
by on Sep. 25, 2011 at 8:07 PM


Quoting momversuswild:

My self assurance came by way of standardized tests.  We have to do them here, beginning in third grade and then every three years thereafter.  My kids ACE them.

We have to test every year. This will be our first year having to do them. I'm not worried at all. =D

Join me in Moms for Education
Moms for Education

"Oppression of spirit is not on
the public school curriculum. Rather, it's a noxious by-product produced
while stewing schooling in a pot w/ unions, administrators,
multi-billion dollar budgets, state education departments, and school
boards, then letting politicians control the heat." Linda Dobson

"When you want to teach
children to think, you begin by treating them seriously when they are
little, giving them responsibilities, talking to them candidly,
providing privacy and solitude for them, and making them readers and
thinkers of significant thoughts from the beginning. That's *if* you
want to teach them to think." ~ Bertrand Russell

Maridel
by on Sep. 25, 2011 at 10:58 PM

OH yea, my mother in law just moved in with us and she has custody of her grandson who is in second grade. He is at the same intellectual and maturity level as my Kindergartener.

DelightfullyMad
by on Sep. 25, 2011 at 11:29 PM

Yes, holy tamoleys, yes. My younger daughter's best friend (who's not even 6 yet) is a prime example. Smart as a whip, but completely screwed up. Granted, part of that is due to his father who is no longer in his life thank goodness, but much is from school. I've known him since he was born and the major change came 2 years ago when he entered school. He's bored, tells me that he hates school every time he comes over (daily, I watch him for his mom who has to work nights), that kids are mean and stupid, and to him, they probably seem stupid, he's that far beyond them intellectually and emotionally. The teacher doesn't listen and his homework bores him to death. He's tired all the time and doesn't get to do anything fun.

It takes considerable coaching daily from me to get him through the pointless homework he gets because it's just that intolerably boring for him. My daughters don't get it and think I'm being mean to him. We're whole-life unschoolers, and they're so far removed from school-like thinking that it doesn't even register to them that making him do his homework is something I have to do. They don't grasp the concept that the school can make parents and childminders do things against their will. Which makes me happy for them as much as it makes me sad for him. He's just so miserable, it breaks my heart because I love him like I love my own kids and my godchildren, and I love his mom too and SHE'S terribly unhappy with the whole thing as well. This summer, I had him most days and after a week off school, he was that happy, lively boy I watched grow up again and stayed that way all summer. He's not yet 3 weeks into first grade at school now and he's back to being the sullen, peevish, almost hopeless child I knew all last year. The change is just so drastic. I'm practically doing cartwheels the last couple of weeks though because I know his time there is limited. After Thanksgiving (in October up here) he's going to be at home with us during the day, doing all the things we do and some loose curriculum his mom got, and won't have to suffer at school any more.

alexsmomaubrys2
by on Sep. 26, 2011 at 8:12 AM


Quoting DelightfullyMad:

Yes, holy tamoleys, yes. My younger daughter's best friend (who's not even 6 yet) is a prime example. Smart as a whip, but completely screwed up. Granted, part of that is due to his father who is no longer in his life thank goodness, but much is from school. I've known him since he was born and the major change came 2 years ago when he entered school. He's bored, tells me that he hates school every time he comes over (daily, I watch him for his mom who has to work nights), that kids are mean and stupid, and to him, they probably seem stupid, he's that far beyond them intellectually and emotionally. The teacher doesn't listen and his homework bores him to death. He's tired all the time and doesn't get to do anything fun.

It takes considerable coaching daily from me to get him through the pointless homework he gets because it's just that intolerably boring for him. My daughters don't get it and think I'm being mean to him. We're whole-life unschoolers, and they're so far removed from school-like thinking that it doesn't even register to them that making him do his homework is something I have to do. They don't grasp the concept that the school can make parents and childminders do things against their will. Which makes me happy for them as much as it makes me sad for him. He's just so miserable, it breaks my heart because I love him like I love my own kids and my godchildren, and I love his mom too and SHE'S terribly unhappy with the whole thing as well. This summer, I had him most days and after a week off school, he was that happy, lively boy I watched grow up again and stayed that way all summer. He's not yet 3 weeks into first grade at school now and he's back to being the sullen, peevish, almost hopeless child I knew all last year. The change is just so drastic. I'm practically doing cartwheels the last couple of weeks though because I know his time there is limited. After Thanksgiving (in October up here) he's going to be at home with us during the day, doing all the things we do and some loose curriculum his mom got, and won't have to suffer at school any more.

That is so great! I'm glad he is getting out of that system. Poor kid.

Join me in Moms for Education
Moms for Education

"Oppression of spirit is not on
the public school curriculum. Rather, it's a noxious by-product produced
while stewing schooling in a pot w/ unions, administrators,
multi-billion dollar budgets, state education departments, and school
boards, then letting politicians control the heat." Linda Dobson

"When you want to teach
children to think, you begin by treating them seriously when they are
little, giving them responsibilities, talking to them candidly,
providing privacy and solitude for them, and making them readers and
thinkers of significant thoughts from the beginning. That's *if* you
want to teach them to think." ~ Bertrand Russell

mem82
by Platinum Member on Sep. 26, 2011 at 10:07 AM

One of the reasons we brought Missie out of school was the bad, bratty behavior of the other kids. Urgh! Going on field trips with these kids was  actually embarrassing. 8( When the curriculum was so far under Missie's ability and  the school not willing to work something out with her, I pulled her. I do think she and now the other kids enjoy a better education and it's all tailored completely to them. 8)

oredeb
by on Sep. 26, 2011 at 11:03 AM

 oh yes alexs moma!! all the time! just watching the kids walking down the street to catch the bus! poor kids! my dh calls says the public schools here look like prisons!

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)