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How would you go about teaching a First Grader(6 yr)?

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 what would you use?

for all the subjects?

how much time would you take?

what fun things would you do with the child?

The child is ready to learn to read,

 

by on Oct. 13, 2011 at 7:09 PM
Replies (11-18):
Kaylon
by on Oct. 14, 2011 at 3:21 PM

Hello Michelle,

Both of my boys love being outdoors.  Thank you for the ideas.. I will have to use them.  Our autumn leaves are not turning just yet. We are in Texas and because of the drought all the leaves that are on the ground are burnt up crisp.   

The more we go about it we are doing alot of "unschooling".  I am just a worry wort about them not learning everything they need to.  But, at the same time I tell myself "RELAX!" they have plenty of time to learn it!    I have to remind myself often to just relax.   Thank you again for your ideas and letting me know I'm not alone. :)

Quoting Michelle914:

Hi,

I am having the same situation.  I am trying to figure out what she likes and incorporate more of that in our studies.  My daughter likes to read and be read to, so I am looking into Life of Fred for math.  I understand there are stories to read and she might be more interested in that.

Does your son enjoy the outdoors?  If so, what about playing in the autumn leaves?  I want to take my girls to play and take lots of picture to send to relatives.  Would your boys enjoy taking pictures or learning about the camera?  You could collect leaves and then research which trees they came from or make a leaf collage.  A friend of mine took her kids apple picking, then the kids helped her make apple sauce.  They learned fractions while cutting the apples!

I don't know much about sports but if your kids enjoy that, is there any way to incorporate sports in your studies?

Like I said, I feel like I'm in the same situation.  My daughter used to like "school work" but now she sits there not doing anything and says how she doesn't like it!  So please let me know if you come up with any ideas that I could try to!

Thanks!

Quoting Kaylon:

I have a 1st grader (turning 7 the end of this month).  He is disliking anything to do with school at this point.  He was my big learner and now all that went out the window.    I would like to see others posts about what and how they do schooling with their 1st grader.   TO ADD:  My youngest is 5 (will be 6 the end of the month)  My boys are exactly one year apart.    Should I just combine their teaching?   



amy_dawn
by on Oct. 16, 2011 at 9:01 AM

I am using The Writing Road to Reading with my daughter, and I cannot recommend it enough! She is progressing amazingly, and has started reading books on her own, and she doesn't yet have all of the phonograms mastered (and we just barely started the spelling words). This curriculum also teaches handwriting, so the kids learn how a phonogram (and later on, a word) is spoken, spelled, and written all at the same time. It helps reinforce everything. Plus there are specific instructions on how to form each letter properly. My son, who is older and already reads pretty well, is still in public school. We'll be pulling him out of school before the end of this school year, most likely (my husband and I have to discuss this a bit more...), and the first thing we are going to do is start at he beginning of this program. He'll zip right through it, but it will give him a better foundation than what he has, and he'll be able to read that much better. This program fills in the gaps where his weaknesses are.

I have an early elementary art curriculum I got from the library and scanned. We do this, or some other big art project that I "dream up" at minimum once per week...but it's not priority. For math, right now we are still shoring up skills she already knows, and doing so primarily with real-world application. I'm also occassionally introducing new concepts to her with real-world application. I have Singapore Math Kindergarten B (second semester) that I just haven't yet started with her, but will soon. For science, I've just been focusing primarily on library books and my own explanations (My husband and I both have science backgrounds.). I've done some 'social studies' type work, focusing on introducing her to different cultures and holidays and to map reading/making.

To Kaylon: I would combine what they are learning to a point. Both of them will have different strengths and weaknesses and both may need to move at a different pace. But if they can move generally at the same pace, then teaching them the same things at the same time would be a good move, in my opinion.

romacox
by Silver Member on Oct. 16, 2011 at 9:18 AM

It really depends on their learning style  Much of what I use is free, and I only spend money on something that is exceptional....no need to buy expensive complete curriculum..

mrspriceisright
by on Oct. 30, 2011 at 12:12 PM

Sorry for the lateness....but THANKS for liking my blog! 

Quoting oredeb:

 betsy i like your blog!!!

Quoting mrspriceisright:

These are the basics of what I used for 1st grade.  She was 5 at the time.

  • Math--Singapore Math
  • Penmanship--Handwriting without tears
  • Reading--Ordinary Parents Guide to Teaching Reading & McGuffey Reader  (We used BOB books in K when we first started Ordinary Parents Guide.)
  • Language--First Language Lessons
  • History--Story of the World
  • Science--we studied the earth and plants

For history and science, we used A LOT of library books and activities.

 

 


oahoah
by Member on Oct. 31, 2011 at 1:05 AM

My oldest is currently in 1st grade and doing both 1st & 2nd grade work.  We are gradually changing from workbooks (and fights over it) to fun work and learning. He loves reading and building with his legos and blocks, he does like math but does not like writing out answers so we'll do a lot of worksheets just verbally and I signed up for 1 month of IXL math online, I think I have 9 days left and we've only used it a couple times.  We are using Mystery of History and both my older boys like listening to those lessons; we also do bible devotions and character-building work. I try to include crafts or projects and outside or P.E. time inside is a necessity, at least once a day but usually more.   Along with math is calendars & time. We will do spelling with Scrabble. I'm not a very creative person when it comes to thinking out of the box so I get a lot of fun learning ideas from the groups here! And even from my own kiddos!

oredeb
by on Oct. 31, 2011 at 12:11 PM

 wow amy dawn, i didnt realize people still used the writing road to reading! good to see that its still around!

Quoting amy_dawn:

I am using The Writing Road to Reading with my daughter, and I cannot recommend it enough! She is progressing amazingly, and has started reading books on her own, and she doesn't yet have all of the phonograms mastered (and we just barely started the spelling words). This curriculum also teaches handwriting, so the kids learn how a phonogram (and later on, a word) is spoken, spelled, and written all at the same time. It helps reinforce everything. Plus there are specific instructions on how to form each letter properly. My son, who is older and already reads pretty well, is still in public school. We'll be pulling him out of school before the end of this school year, most likely (my husband and I have to discuss this a bit more...), and the first thing we are going to do is start at he beginning of this program. He'll zip right through it, but it will give him a better foundation than what he has, and he'll be able to read that much better. This program fills in the gaps where his weaknesses are.

I have an early elementary art curriculum I got from the library and scanned. We do this, or some other big art project that I "dream up" at minimum once per week...but it's not priority. For math, right now we are still shoring up skills she already knows, and doing so primarily with real-world application. I'm also occassionally introducing new concepts to her with real-world application. I have Singapore Math Kindergarten B (second semester) that I just haven't yet started with her, but will soon. For science, I've just been focusing primarily on library books and my own explanations (My husband and I both have science backgrounds.). I've done some 'social studies' type work, focusing on introducing her to different cultures and holidays and to map reading/making.

To Kaylon: I would combine what they are learning to a point. Both of them will have different strengths and weaknesses and both may need to move at a different pace. But if they can move generally at the same pace, then teaching them the same things at the same time would be a good move, in my opinion.

 

romacox
by Silver Member on Nov. 1, 2011 at 5:42 PM

Adjusting to the childs learning style makes the difference.  Children have a natural desire to learn, and if we tap into that, they are eager to learn. If we don't they resist.

1.  The rational child responds very well to unschooling

2.  The Hands On Learner  hate workbooks, but love it if you turn it into a game, or something they can make.

3.  The Guardian Personalities like workbooks, and helping you teach others. They also learn wile helping you.

4.  The Intuitive learn best with discussion

The links above will help you determine which one your child is, and the two links below help you decide how to teach them.

How To Home School

Teaching Reading And Phonics Is Easy And Fun

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