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What's a good starting point for............

Posted by on Nov. 27, 2011 at 1:52 AM
  • 16 Replies

History and science?  I have a 10 y.o. DS who is in 5th grade and I can not find a good starting point for history and science.  I was thinking maybe American history first, but not sure what to do.  

Science I don't know if there is a specific place I should start or just go with what he likes which is just wanting to do all kinds of experiments, chemistry in the fact that he thinks it's cool when you can blow up something, and he wants to make a engine so he can make his "Johnny 5" lego robot move that he built.   

Gevie

by on Nov. 27, 2011 at 1:52 AM
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hottmommi42
by on Nov. 27, 2011 at 3:07 AM
I always found it cool learning about the history of things I though interesting like music history, if the history of my city (some cool thi.hs actually happened here!) Idk if it helps, but its a start!
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jen2150
by Silver Member on Nov. 27, 2011 at 8:56 AM

Maybe ask them what they would like to do?  History can sometimes be a good start at the beginning and go from there.  Chemistry is awesome for any age group young or older.  Real Science Odyssey and Noeo homeschool science are some good places to start.  A history of US by Joy Hakim are really good books on US history.  I did Chemistry with my sons last year and they absolutely loved it.

Jinx-Troublex3
by Jinx on Nov. 27, 2011 at 9:03 AM
For science, I had the kids each select a Science in a nutshell kit that sounded fun. Then we found books at the library to go with them.

For history, we follow or state standards just because none of the kids really take an interest in it.
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moonhorse
by on Nov. 27, 2011 at 9:08 AM

When I was in school we started at the beginning which was Prehistoric peoples entering the Americas over the Bering Strait that lies between Russia and Alaska.  Then advanced from there up until the 20th century.

mem82
by Platinum Member on Nov. 27, 2011 at 3:28 PM

This is a very common way to do it.

Quoting moonhorse:

When I was in school we started at the beginning which was Prehistoric peoples entering the Americas over the Bering Strait that lies between Russia and Alaska.  Then advanced from there up until the 20th century.


swim-mom72
by on Nov. 28, 2011 at 8:56 AM

If you have not covered state history, then you could start there.

We are Christians, so when my kids were 5th and 8th grade we started with the book of Genisis. And then used Sonlight's curriculum for ancient history to guide us through Egypt, Summaria, Turkey, etc...

oredeb
by debbie on Nov. 28, 2011 at 11:13 AM

 5th grade scope and sequence

Earth


Earth's Interior - Study the basic structure of the Earth's interior: crust, mantle, outer core, inner core.

Plate Tectonics - Explain that some changes in the Earth's surface are due to plate tectonics.

Measuring an Earthquake - Define: tsunamis, seismograph, Richter scale.

Results of an Earthquake - Identify what happens in an earthquake. Locate: some major faults, major fault zones, Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

Changes of Earth's Surface - Recognize that changes that occur on the Earth's surface are a result of forces acting upon it. Explain the structure of a volcano: magma, lava, active, dormant, extinct. Locate the Ring of Fire.

Continental Drift & Pangaea - Know that heat flow and movement of material within the Earth move the continents. Describe the continental drift and Pangaea.

Volcanoes & Folded Mountains - Understand how volcanic mountains and folded mountains are formed.

Mountains & Ocean Basins - Know that plate movement creates mountains and ocean basins. Understand how fault-block mountains and dome-shaped mountains are formed. Locate the Mariana Trench.

Rocks & Fossils Tell a Story - Describe ways in which rocks and fossils record events of Earth's history, documenting plate movements, volcanic eruptions, and cycles of erosion and deposition.

Ice Cores & Tree Rings - Describe ways in which ice cores and tree rings record events of Earth's history, documenting plate movements, volcanic eruptions, and cycles of erosion and deposition.

Geology - Describe geology as a field of study.

Weather

Weather & Climate - Differentiate between weather and climate.

The Water Cycle - Describe the hydrologic cycle and the role of evaporation, precipitation, and condensation as they relate to water in the atmosphere.

Layers of the Atmosphere - Know that the sun and the Earth heat the atmosphere and that the atmosphere is made up of several layers, including the troposphere, the stratosphere, the mesosphere, the ionosphere, and the exosphere.

Classification of Clouds - Classify clouds (cirrus, stratus, cumulus, cumulonimbus) by their composition, height, and type of precipitation.

Instruments to Collect Data - Use weather instruments to collect data and measure air temperature (thermometer), precipitation (rain gauge), and wind speed (anemometer).

Air Pressure & Humidity - Use weather instruments to collect data and measure air pressure (barometer) and humidity (hygrometer).

Identify Pressure Systems - Identify pressure systems, fronts, and other features on weather maps and charts.

Develop Forecasts - Develop forecasts using pressure systems, fronts, and other features on weather maps.

The Earth's Climate Zone - Describe Earth's climate zones and what causes each.

Meteorology - Describe meteorology as a field of study.

Plants

Life Cycle of a Plant - Identify the life cycle of covered-seed (flowering) plants: fertilization, embryo, endosperm, seed coat, germination, plant growth, flowers, new seeds.

Reproduction of a Plant - Investigate the reproduction of covered-seed (flowering) plants: petals, stamen, anther, pistil, ovule, ovum, pollen and pollination, pollen tube, ovary, embryo, germination, fruit.

Life Cycle of Naked-Seed Plant - Identify the life cycle of naked-seed (conifer) plants: pollen, seed, male and female cones.

Common Pollen Carriers - Identify common pollen carriers: insects, birds, wind.

Reproduction of Non-seed Plant - Investigate the reproduction of non-seed (moss, fern) plants (spores).
 

Organisms

The Smallest Unit of Life - Identify the cell as the basic unit of life and the smallest unit that can reproduce itself.

Characteristics of a Cell - Identify and describe the structure and function of cell parts: cell membrane, cytoplasm, mitochondria, ribosomes.

Function of Cell Parts - Identify and describe the structure and function of cell parts: nucleus, nuclear membrane, vacuoles, endoplasmic reticulum.

Single & Multi-celled Organism - Give examples of single-celled and multicellular organisms.

Plant & Animal Cells - Identify the similarities and differences between plant and animal cells.

Parts of a Microscope - Identify and label the parts of a simple compound microscope: eyepiece, ocular tube, coarse adjustment knob, fine adjustment knob, arm, base, mirror, aperture or diaphragm, stage, low-power objective lens, high-power objective lens.

Human Body

Body and Mind - Identify personal interests, capabilities, and values. Identify personal strengths and weaknesses and develop ways to maximize strengths. Describe conditions that contribute to disease, such as contaminated food or water, lack of immunization, poor nutrition, and improper hygiene. Explain the roles of sleep and rest in fitness.

 Matter

Structural Components of Atoms - Identify electrons, protons, and neutrons as basic structural components of atoms.

Construction of Matter - Know that all matter is made up of atoms that may join together to form molecules and compounds, and that the state of matter is determined by the motion of molecules.

Elements - Know that elements have atoms of only one kind, and recognize that elements can be organized in a systematic way.

Periodic Table - Be able to read and understand some of the periodic table: elements can be identified by symbols, the table can be read across from left to right and from top to bottom, atomic numbers tell how many protons are in each atom, the table is divided into metals and nonmetals, elements on opposite sides of the table easily react with each other to form compounds

usmom3
by BJ on Nov. 28, 2011 at 11:20 AM

 I think starting in a place where the child has an interest is the best place. So if your DS is interested in one kind of science over the others start there (he will be more in to it if it is already an interest of his)

oredeb
by debbie on Nov. 28, 2011 at 11:20 AM

i think amercian history is a good start- keep a time line!

also heres another 5th grade scope and sequence

  • North American Indians
  • Westward Expansion
  • John Eliot
  • Immigration to America
  • Early American History
  • The Industrial Revolution
  • Explorers and Settlements
  • American History 1901-1935
  • America and England at war
  • American Independence
  • The Spanish-American War
  • Articles of Confederation
  • World War I
  • Systems of Government
  • The League of Nations
  • Bill of rights
  • American History 1929 - present
  • American History 1797-1850
  • North and South--Differences in interests
  • World Depression
  • The Civil War
  • World War II
  • The United Nations
  • The Korean War
oredeb
by debbie on Nov. 28, 2011 at 11:24 AM
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