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Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

Lesson Plans....

Posted by on Feb. 21, 2012 at 7:58 AM
  • 12 Replies

I started working on our lesson plan last night.  All I have to say is I wanted to pull my hair out after an hour, and I barely got through the first week.  For all you veteran home schoolers, do you have any pointers?  I could use some.  Thank you in advance!  

by on Feb. 21, 2012 at 7:58 AM
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swim-mom72
by on Feb. 21, 2012 at 9:50 AM

We could be more helpful if we knew ages of your kids and if you are using a set curric. : )

Many publishers have things planned out for you. Sonlight, My Father's World, Winter's promise and Illuminations come to mind.

You should not let the planning stress you out, then the actual schooling becomes no fun. What part of the planning is stressing you? Maybe you are trying to fit too much into each day, instead of seeing the BIGger picture of the longterm plan. That is what I did in the beginning, and it overwhelmed me. Now, my kids each have their own planner that I write each days work, for each subject, for 2 weeks at a time. This works well for us and cuts down on the day-to-day annoyance of "Moooom, what do I do next?"

Jinx-Troublex3
by Jinx on Feb. 21, 2012 at 9:59 AM
It takes me about 1 1/2 hours a week to do lesson plans for my two kids but they are older. They each get their own assignment sheet even though we do some things together because they like being able to check it off.

When DD was prek and knder I didn't do lesson plans we just did whatever came up :)

As you get into a routine, And are familiar with your programs it get easier.
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SpiritedDragon
by on Feb. 21, 2012 at 10:08 AM

My boys are 11yrs and 9yrs old.  They will be in 4th and 5th grade next year, when we start homeschooling.   We are not using a box set, where I don't have the financial capability to purchase.  So we are piecing together.  Science, we are using Harcourt 5th grade, since alot of the 4th grade is the same as the 5th grade.  

mem82
by Platinum Member on Feb. 21, 2012 at 11:34 AM
1 mom liked this

Here's a few tips in no particular order:

1. Don't plan too far in advance! Any bump in the road will completely knock your schedule 'off' and you'll constantly have to redo it.

2. I plan by theme for the long term. I make a file of worksheets, labs, websites, videos for each subject. That way, I'm half way planned for when I do need to sit down and work out the week or two. Like, I know at some point, we'll be doing Vikings and also, muplitication. Anytime I run across something I like or need for those subjects, I just book mark it. It takes so much work out of planning.

3. Remember things can be combined. Have your boys write a report on what they are studying in Science and draw their spelling words from that, also.

4.If you have $20, check out Edhelper, it's for the upper grades and younger grades and it does almost complete plans. 

5.Here's a free Lang. Arts workbook you can print for each grade 1st-6th. click me

You are doing great!

Quoting SpiritedDragon:

My boys are 11yrs and 9yrs old.  They will be in 4th and 5th grade next year, when we start homeschooling.   We are not using a box set, where I don't have the financial capability to purchase.  So we are piecing together.  Science, we are using Harcourt 5th grade, since alot of the 4th grade is the same as the 5th grade.  




KickButtMama
by Shannon on Feb. 21, 2012 at 1:16 PM
I wrote about this on my blog a while back -
http://kickbuttcrazylapbooks.blogspot.com/2011/07/designing-your-own-curriculum.html
4quivers
by on Feb. 21, 2012 at 2:47 PM

It may be suitable to have a pivot point.  You choose your base i.e. Literature or History . . .  And pull the other subjects out of them.  mem82 is right.  Combine everything.  Reading anything counts as reading, writing counts for spelling, art can be history illustrations.

We use a 4 yr cycle of History.  Ancient History>up to 1 BC / Middle Ages 1AD-500 AD / Exploration 500 AD to 1850/ Modern History 1850-Now  This is just the easiest way to seperate for me.  We study everything we find interesting in those periods.  There's so much that even if you do a little you get a lot!  Just check out books from the library on the different topics.  It is helpful to have a few History textbooks in chronological order for reference.  You must also remember that each book will probably focus on either european or western mindsets and you will have to do some research for any other histories.

 

SpiritedDragon
by on Feb. 21, 2012 at 3:48 PM

Thank you, I didn't know you could actually mix all the subjects into each other.  For it to accounted for.  I will definitely work with that on on American history, with a mix of maybe some American lit during the time frames we hit.  

Quoting 4quivers:

It may be suitable to have a pivot point.  You choose your base i.e. Literature or History . . .  And pull the other subjects out of them.  mem82 is right.  Combine everything.  Reading anything counts as reading, writing counts for spelling, art can be history illustrations.

We use a 4 yr cycle of History.  Ancient History>up to 1 BC / Middle Ages 1AD-500 AD / Exploration 500 AD to 1850/ Modern History 1850-Now  This is just the easiest way to seperate for me.  We study everything we find interesting in those periods.  There's so much that even if you do a little you get a lot!  Just check out books from the library on the different topics.  It is helpful to have a few History textbooks in chronological order for reference.  You must also remember that each book will probably focus on either european or western mindsets and you will have to do some research for any other histories.



romacox
by Silver Member on Feb. 21, 2012 at 4:34 PM

Sure.  Once you get the hang of it, it is really very easy...Fun too.   Here is one on the reading element, Sequencing.

This website has more free lesson plans (along with other things).  Educators Resources

romacox
by Silver Member on Feb. 21, 2012 at 5:33 PM

P.S. Here is a format of what I often use to create a lesson plan

  • First: List the objectives of what I want each child to learn (I always do this)
  • plan a group activity and/ or discussion about the lesson
  • then each child breaks up into their individual activity (this is not always necessary)
  • finally we all come together again, and each child shares their individual activity.  At that point we can correct mistakes.

Note: I like the old one room school house approach where children learn as much (or more) from each other as they do from me. 

  • For example: to teach measuring we might measure every one's shoes, and use dad's shoes to measure a room.
  •  Make a bird house together,.
  • Cooking can teach measuring of cups, pints, cutting an apple in half or in quarter's, ext.
  •  At the grocery store they can learn about pounds, or even deciding which product is the most economical based on price, and weight. 
  • balancing check books with bank statements

Studies show children learn best from play and real life experiences. 

soy_latte
by on Feb. 21, 2012 at 5:43 PM
It took me a minute to realize this was a different group. I was thinking "Bah! Where are all my replies!?"
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