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Corrected!!!:Are you or have you taught evolution and creation, and ancient aliens in your school?

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by on Mar. 5, 2012 at 7:01 PM
Replies (51-59):
sha_lyn68
by Bronze Member on Apr. 1, 2012 at 10:49 AM

Do you understand the difference between theory when used in the sciences and theory when used commonly? Creation is not a scientific theory.

The facts that show how live has evolved on earth seem illogical, yet the myth that some magical being spoke and created a fully form person seems logical to you. I think you need to look up logic when you look up scientific theory too.

Quoting Ruth372:

We teach Creation.  We discus the theory of evolution so that they understand what it is.  Neither one can be proven scientifically.  The origin of life cannot be reproduced.  We cannot go back in time to watch it.  However you believe life began on earth, you cannot prove it.  They are all theorys.  I look around at the intricate design of the world and I cannot believe it happened by accident.  That does not seem logical to me.


4quivers
by on Apr. 6, 2012 at 8:28 PM


Quoting Clairwil:


If I find a bottle of milk on my doorstep in the morning, it could be because my regular milkman put it there, like he does every morning.  Or it could be because an alien space ship landed and placed it there when nobody was looking.

I can't disprove either theory.

None the less, that doesn't make them equally likely.

You are right.  Those are both possibilities.  But it is also possible that since our bodies and all creation are made of energy, that bottle of milk could have materialized simply by your will of mind.  After all, just because you see it, doesn't mean you actually see it.  You see, our eyes don't actually see.  It's just our brain telling us what we see.  In another sense, the computer you are touching right now, is simply particles moving around.  But when you touch it, it changes, creating a "feeling".  Again though, your sense of touch is actually your brain telling you that something is there.

At least those are some things modern physicists are talking about.   (Unless you'd call them all crazy and they are getting millions of dollars to study the "equally impossible".  )

The possibilities really are endless.  That's why there are always debates like this!

"Bless me, I couldn't get on at all without my flock of dear, noisy, naughty, harum-scarum little lads!!


                                                                                                    Louisa May Alcott in "Little Men"

chrlnr
by on Apr. 6, 2012 at 8:31 PM
I will teach a mixture, as I believe in God led evolution
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Clairwil
by on Apr. 7, 2012 at 2:54 AM
Quoting 4quivers:
Quoting Clairwil:


If I find a bottle of milk on my doorstep in the morning, it could be because my regular milkman put it there, like he does every morning.  Or it could be because an alien space ship landed and placed it there when nobody was looking.

I can't disprove either theory.

None the less, that doesn't make them equally likely.

You are right.  Those are both possibilities.  But it is also possible that since our bodies and all creation are made of energy, that bottle of milk could have materialized simply by your will of mind.  After all, just because you see it, doesn't mean you actually see it.  You see, our eyes don't actually see.  It's just our brain telling us what we see.  In another sense, the computer you are touching right now, is simply particles moving around.  But when you touch it, it changes, creating a "feeling".  Again though, your sense of touch is actually your brain telling you that something is there.

At least those are some things modern physicists are talking about.   (Unless you'd call them all crazy and they are getting millions of dollars to study the "equally impossible".  )

The possibilities really are endless.  That's why there are always debates like this!

Yes, the possibilities are practically endless.  But not all possibilities are equally likely.

jen2150
by Silver Member on Apr. 7, 2012 at 4:04 AM

I teach the science behind all the theories and then let the evidence speak for itself.  

Clairwil
by on Apr. 7, 2012 at 4:40 AM
1 mom liked this


Quoting jen2150:

I teach the science behind all the theories and then let the evidence speak for itself.  

Norse Creation Myth

At the beginning of time, nothing existed. The earth, the gentle oceans lapping up against its shores, man and animal had not yet been created. Only a great yawning abyss was present in the void of nothingness. Out of the abyss, a land of eternal mist, darkness and terrible cold was formed to the North; to all beings, this land was known as Niflheim. In the midst of the Dark Land surged a fountain known as Hvergelmir, from which spread the freezing glacial waters of twelve rivers throughout the void. To the South lay the land of Fire, Muspellsheim; an infernal region of unbearable, unsatiable heat and flames. From there poured rivers of fire whose waters contained a bitter poison which, little by little, gathered and became a solid mass. From the ice flowing from the North, this mass of venom was covered in a thick layer of frost. With the heat blowing from the lands of Fire, the frost began to melt, and the giant Ymir was born from poison and ice.

Ymir became the father of all giants. On the night of his creation, he fell asleep near the lands of the South and became completely bathed in sweat: from under his left arm were born man and woman, both giants like him. At the same time, the block of ice from which he was born gave forth the great cow Audumla, the wet-nurse of the giants. Ymir refreshed himself from her udders at the beginning of every day, which flowed with life-giving milk. Audumla began to lick the salt from the ice to nourish herself, and the heat of her tongue and breath yielded first the hair, then the head, and finally the entire body of a being whose name was Buri. Buri had a son whose name was Bor, who went on to marry Ymir's daughter, Bestla. With her, he fathered the three gods Odin, Vili and Ve.




How exactly do you teach the science behind religous creation myths?

Bethsunshine
by on Apr. 7, 2012 at 9:00 AM

We teach Creation but they also know that some people believe in the theory of evolution.

jen2150
by Silver Member on Apr. 7, 2012 at 9:37 AM

Who says they are myths?  There is plenty of evidence that supports intelligient design.  Every time I look at an idea I look at what both sides are saying.  I use logic to seperate fact from fiction.  I also look at the source of all scientific evidence.  It is myth that there is not any scientific evidence that supports intelligient design.  At the time evolution was conceived everyone thought the single cell was simple.  It is very far from simple.  It is incredibly complex.  It is illogical to me to believe that a complex being such as man evolved from rocks essentially.  If you trace everything back that is basically what happened.  Do you teach your children the scientific evidence behind intelligient design?  If not, Why?  I plan on teaching my children the science of evolution.  I also encourage my children to prove everything I say.  As adults they will each have to weigh the evidence on both sides and make up their minds which theory holds more weight.  I believe my kids should have all the facts before they make up their minds which to believe as adults.


Quoting jen2150:

I teach the science behind all the theories and then let the evidence speak for itself.  

Norse Creation Myth

At the beginning of time, nothing existed. The earth, the gentle oceans lapping up against its shores, man and animal had not yet been created. Only a great yawning abyss was present in the void of nothingness. Out of the abyss, a land of eternal mist, darkness and terrible cold was formed to the North; to all beings, this land was known as Niflheim. In the midst of the Dark Land surged a fountain known as Hvergelmir, from which spread the freezing glacial waters of twelve rivers throughout the void. To the South lay the land of Fire, Muspellsheim; an infernal region of unbearable, unsatiable heat and flames. From there poured rivers of fire whose waters contained a bitter poison which, little by little, gathered and became a solid mass. From the ice flowing from the North, this mass of venom was covered in a thick layer of frost. With the heat blowing from the lands of Fire, the frost began to melt, and the giant Ymir was born from poison and ice.

Ymir became the father of all giants. On the night of his creation, he fell asleep near the lands of the South and became completely bathed in sweat: from under his left arm were born man and woman, both giants like him. At the same time, the block of ice from which he was born gave forth the great cow Audumla, the wet-nurse of the giants. Ymir refreshed himself from her udders at the beginning of every day, which flowed with life-giving milk. Audumla began to lick the salt from the ice to nourish herself, and the heat of her tongue and breath yielded first the hair, then the head, and finally the entire body of a being whose name was Buri. Buri had a son whose name was Bor, who went on to marry Ymir's daughter, Bestla. With her, he fathered the three gods Odin, Vili and Ve.




How exactly do you teach the science behind religous creation myths?


4quivers
by on Apr. 7, 2012 at 3:50 PM

Myths and Legends are very important for us to understand where we came from.  It's like a tall tale.  Even though not all of it may be true.  There is still SOME truth behind it.  And what's wrong with Viking Giants?  There is a ton of evidence of giants!  The Anazazi are the most local here in the States.  Hundreds of Giants locked in a cavernous tomb and asphixiated by the smoke from the fire blocking the door.  There are plenty of legends about real Giants that could have easily been referenced to Vikings.  Not to mention many others.  Christianity, Islam, Native American tribes and others all have legends of Giants.  So you see, Legends and Myths are just as probable as any other idea.

"Bless me, I couldn't get on at all without my flock of dear, noisy, naughty, harum-scarum little lads!!


                                                                                                    Louisa May Alcott in "Little Men"

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