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Learn from homeschooling to improve public education- think it can happen?

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Learn from homeschooling to improve public education

Since 1999, the number of U.S. students homeschooling has nearly doubled. It continues to be a viable alternative to public or private education, and as trust in the public-school system dwindles, more and more parents are turning to educating their kids themselves.

An increase in the popularity of homeschooling in America demonstrates a severe lack of confidence in the public-education system. Americans should be able to trust in their government's ability to provide an adequate education for the next generation, and if they can't, we should re-evaluate and refine our approach to schooling. One method is to determine the reasoning behind homeschooling's success and attempt to implement those principles in public classrooms.

The reason homeschooling works is largely because of its individualized approach. This, of course, runs upstream from the consequences of No Child Left Behind, which, in effect, requires teachers to instruct homogeneously. By applying an individualized approach to teaching, interest and innovation would propel our schools to higher achievement and attract more would-be homeschoolers, freeing up parents to contribute to the workforce.

Homeschooling has steadily evolved into more than just a self-righteous alternative for Bible Belt parents who cower at the thought of evolution being taught in biology classes as something more than a hypothesis. Today, the attraction of homeschooling transcends political lines of division.

"Homeschoolers of all stripes believe that they alone should decide how their children are educated, and they unite in order to press for the absence of regulations or the most permissive regulation possible,"writesRobert Reich in a 2005 Stanford University research paper, "Why Homeschooling Should Be Regulated."

The results — without accounting for control factors — indicate that homeschooling produces better students. While the percentile rank for public schools is, by definition, 50 percent, homeschooled children rank between the 65th and 80th percentiles, according the National Home Education Research Institution.

This gap in achievement should act as inspiration for school reform. But of course, evidence parallel to public classrooms should be evaluated before taking any bold action.

One 2012 study, called "Assessing Performance: The Impact of Organizational Climates and Politics on Public Schools' Performance," found that four "climates" were positively correlated to public-school performance: participative, innovative, leadership, and service — two of which are integrated in the foundation of homeschooling. In a perfect world, every child would be homeschooled and receive the same individualized attention.

Yet, not all families have the time or the financial flexibility to homeschool, not to mention the vast majority of parents are most likely not qualified to educate their children in a fashion that prepares them for college and the professional world. The majority of families in America depend on the public-school system to educate their children.

Instead of bashing the government for its methodologies and flawed system of funding, we should address the issue that while some parents might choose to educate their children for personal reasons, others do it out of a fear of sending their kids through flawed or failing systems. Fear of an inadequate education should not be a weighty factor in any family's decision to homeschool.

The goal should be to eradicate circumstantially prompted homeschooling by tailoring educational policy based on what does and what does not improve overall student performance.

When it comes to curricula, schools should focus on individual tutoring, increased instructional time, and cooperative learning. Initiatives such as Edutopia offer some insight into potential methods of bettering public-school performance.

Homeschooling essentially revolves around parental involvement. In the same light, one might also consider the agency of parents in the sphere of public education and the positive effects of being involved in their child's K-12 schooling. Parents getting involved in local educational reform and vocalizing concerns can have an obvious, tangible effect. Programs such as Project Appleseed call on parents to "pledge" to improve public-school systems by being involved.

Every child should have access to an adequate education. Policy should not aim to eliminate homeschooling — it should aim to learn from it.

by on Mar. 13, 2012 at 1:19 PM
Replies (11-19):
AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Mar. 13, 2012 at 9:38 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting mem82:

The article made some interesting points. I think that if public schools could have an 'extra' teacher in each room to be a silent helping hand, that, alone, would raise testing levels. I believe, also, that homeschoolers should be regulated to a point, if only to protect a small fraction of kids.

Don't you unschool? I could very well be mistaken (it's been a long few days, lol); but if you are, I'm surprised you feel the government should have any power over a homeschool.

FWIW, I am firmly (personally) against unschooling.... but, I do not support any government intervention in homeschooling, no matter what my personal feelings on it are. Then, I'm for very small government in general (Libertarian)

:)

In general, I'm not sure I support government funded schools to begin with...

OP - I can't focus on the entire article right now. I'm pregnant and impatient; with that said, I think it would be impossible for public school to EVER emulate the benefits of a homeschool. By default, the public school would HAVE TO cater to the minority and the "slow learner" - leaving the rest in the dust; not doing that would be counterproductive to moving ahead with those advanced learners. No win. With the rate of school cuts, there is no way schools could financially support more than one teacher per class.

I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Academic pushing Mother. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosey, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it raising my child. I believe that my place, as a woman, is in the home caring for my husband and children. My husband is head of our home.             Aimee











mem82
by Platinum Member on Mar. 13, 2012 at 9:44 PM

No, I'm ecletic, not unschooling. 8) There's a bit of unschooler in us, though. LOL We tend to follow the rabbit holes.

Quoting AutymsMommy:


Quoting mem82:

The article made some interesting points. I think that if public schools could have an 'extra' teacher in each room to be a silent helping hand, that, alone, would raise testing levels. I believe, also, that homeschoolers should be regulated to a point, if only to protect a small fraction of kids.

Don't you unschool? I could very well be mistaken (it's been a long few days, lol); but if you are, I'm surprised you feel the government should have any power over a homeschool.

FWIW, I am firmly (personally) against unschooling.... but, I do not support any government intervention in homeschooling, no matter what my personal feelings on it are. Then, I'm for very small government in general (Libertarian)

:)

In general, I'm not sure I support government funded schools to begin with...

OP - I can't focus on the entire article right now. I'm pregnant and impatient; with that said, I think it would be impossible for public school to EVER emulate the benefits of a homeschool. By default, the public school would HAVE TO cater to the minority and the "slow learner" - leaving the rest in the dust; not doing that would be counterproductive to moving ahead with those advanced learners. No win. With the rate of school cuts, there is no way schools could financially support more than one teacher per class.




snowangel1979
by Member on Mar. 13, 2012 at 10:16 PM
I don't think it will ever happen, there is no way to "eradicate the circumstances" that are causing me to want to homeschool.. They don't have the funding to give more one on one attention to students. I had a teacher who worked for a small private school. She couldn't believe the amount of children in a typical public school class room and she said after about a 1-15 ratio it just becomes crowd control. It's not possible to teach or learn properly. I know I can't focus in a small room with 27 other people. They're solution is to drug all the kids. They can't control the peer pressure. When they get to like 3rd grade all they teach is what is on the meap test. That's where they get funds from. Honestly I don't think the schools could really care if your child actually learns anything as long as they pound what's on that test in there head to get the funding. I think government involvement would NOT be good they would just end up taking over, telling you what to teach and when.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
carolkey74
by on Mar. 13, 2012 at 10:51 PM
1 mom liked this
Love it! Im glad to see there are more rabbit hole chasers on here lol! Don't you love being able to go where the learning takes you?


Quoting mem82:

No, I'm ecletic, not unschooling. 8) There's a bit of unschooler in us, though. LOL We tend to follow the rabbit holes.

Quoting AutymsMommy:



Quoting mem82:

The article made some interesting points. I think that if public schools could have an 'extra' teacher in each room to be a silent helping hand, that, alone, would raise testing levels. I believe, also, that homeschoolers should be regulated to a point, if only to protect a small fraction of kids.

Don't you unschool? I could very well be mistaken (it's been a long few days, lol); but if you are, I'm surprised you feel the government should have any power over a homeschool.

FWIW, I am firmly (personally) against unschooling.... but, I do not support any government intervention in homeschooling, no matter what my personal feelings on it are. Then, I'm for very small government in general (Libertarian)

:)

In general, I'm not sure I support government funded schools to begin with...

OP - I can't focus on the entire article right now. I'm pregnant and impatient; with that said, I think it would be impossible for public school to EVER emulate the benefits of a homeschool. By default, the public school would HAVE TO cater to the minority and the "slow learner" - leaving the rest in the dust; not doing that would be counterproductive to moving ahead with those advanced learners. No win. With the rate of school cuts, there is no way schools could financially support more than one teacher per class.



Posted on CafeMom Mobile
mem82
by Platinum Member on Mar. 13, 2012 at 11:22 PM

Heck yeah! LOL We have been into some pretty odd rabbit holes, too.

Quoting carolkey74:

Love it! Im glad to see there are more rabbit hole chasers on here lol! Don't you love being able to go where the learning takes you?


Quoting mem82:

No, I'm ecletic, not unschooling. 8) There's a bit of unschooler in us, though. LOL We tend to follow the rabbit holes.

Quoting AutymsMommy:



Quoting mem82:

The article made some interesting points. I think that if public schools could have an 'extra' teacher in each room to be a silent helping hand, that, alone, would raise testing levels. I believe, also, that homeschoolers should be regulated to a point, if only to protect a small fraction of kids.

Don't you unschool? I could very well be mistaken (it's been a long few days, lol); but if you are, I'm surprised you feel the government should have any power over a homeschool.

FWIW, I am firmly (personally) against unschooling.... but, I do not support any government intervention in homeschooling, no matter what my personal feelings on it are. Then, I'm for very small government in general (Libertarian)

:)

In general, I'm not sure I support government funded schools to begin with...

OP - I can't focus on the entire article right now. I'm pregnant and impatient; with that said, I think it would be impossible for public school to EVER emulate the benefits of a homeschool. By default, the public school would HAVE TO cater to the minority and the "slow learner" - leaving the rest in the dust; not doing that would be counterproductive to moving ahead with those advanced learners. No win. With the rate of school cuts, there is no way schools could financially support more than one teacher per class.






Anna92464
by on Mar. 14, 2012 at 2:09 PM

What I'd like to see is for public schooling to go by the wayside as an experiment that turned out badly.  I'd like to see our culture change to the point of the definition of a good parent is one who homeschools and builds community rather than thinking that it is the governments job.  This is a new opinion for me due to watching the problems and attitudes in my community with public school vs. homeschooling.  I tried for years to remain neutral, but neither side allows for that and I ended up being personally attacked from every side....It isn't easy standing alone. 

mem82
by Platinum Member on Mar. 14, 2012 at 2:15 PM

Sounds like it has been tough!

Quoting Anna92464:

What I'd like to see is for public schooling to go by the wayside as an experiment that turned out badly.  I'd like to see our culture change to the point of the definition of a good parent is one who homeschools and builds community rather than thinking that it is the governments job.  This is a new opinion for me due to watching the problems and attitudes in my community with public school vs. homeschooling.  I tried for years to remain neutral, but neither side allows for that and I ended up being personally attacked from every side....It isn't easy standing alone. 




Anna92464
by on Mar. 14, 2012 at 2:32 PM

That aspect of it has, yes.   But life is tough, and I'm learning to accept that. :)  

KickButtMama
by Shannon on Mar. 14, 2012 at 2:55 PM
I agree with the article. The educational system we have worked great in the post WWII era, but in modern society it just doesn't work. I think a lot of modern HS families chose to HS in order to avoid an admittedly failed system. Why put your children in a system that even educators admit is broken beyond recognition? No matter how hard it is physically, emotionally, or financially, my job as mom is to prepare my child for life as an adult. Therefore i have to give them the education that will best prepare them for college and the workforce. If even government educators admit that the PS sytem will not achieve this goal, then it is my job to take up the slack.

That said. I am not sure there can be a brick & morter school that can give the individualized education necessary for each child. It would be impossible unless kids had individual tutors. I think more and more districts will turn to online style learning, and public schools will be more like study hall & daycare.
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