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Troubled Waters w/Phonics

Posted by on May. 23, 2012 at 9:53 AM
  • 16 Replies
My 4 yr old son, who will be 5 in September and is being tested for ADHD, is having a very hard time with the start of phonics. We have only done the letters I and U with Abeka. He is confusing them and can't remember which letter is which or which sound goes with which letter. I'm curious at what age you ladies suggest start a phonics program? Is he still too young maybe? I'm curious if maybe I should try a different program too. I've always highly recommended Abeka but I'm concerned it might not be the right fit for him. Has anyone used BJU? I was looking over their material too. Thank you for any suggestions. I should probably add he knows the alphabet song, but does not know all the letters by sight yet.
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by on May. 23, 2012 at 9:53 AM
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oredeb
by debbie on May. 23, 2012 at 10:40 AM

 hi sourthern lady, it could be hes not ready yet hes only 4! i have a test i use on the kids to see if they are ready  , this is on my blog

'If you are in tune to your child you will be able to tell when he/she is ready to learn how to read. They have different ways of letting us know when the time comes.
1. Some of the kids learn the favorite books we read to them by heart and like to sit pretending to read them.
2.Some children ask us about words or letters. Whats that word say or whats that letter or how do you make that letter.
3.To see if the child is ready teach him/her to write or pronounce one or more sounds. Does he/she want to learn , seem interested in learning them? or does the child resist?
'

its worked for the kids i teach, also how long are you making your sons lessons? since he had adhd maybe the time should only be 5-10 min. at first work up to a longer lesson time. maybe make it more hands on for him also, make some flash cards with the letter on it so he can pick it up, etc.  abeka is a good program but maybe you need to adjust how they teach a bit to your sons learning

KickButtMama
by Shannon on May. 23, 2012 at 10:40 AM
3 moms liked this
I highly recommend getting the movie Leap Frogs Letter Factory. I have a special needs son (aspergers) which shares traits with adhd, and textbook/worksheet learning is almost always a big fail with these learners. Instead doing more visual and hands on learning is what i have found to work.
SouthernLadyRTR
by on May. 23, 2012 at 11:02 AM
Quoting oredeb:

 hi sourthern lady, it could be hes not ready yet hes only 4! i have a test i use on the kids to see if they are ready  , this is on my blog


'If you are in tune to your child you will be able to tell when he/she is ready to learn how to read. They have different ways of letting us know when the time comes.1. Some of the kids learn the favorite books we read to them by heart and like to sit pretending to read them.2.Some children ask us about words or letters. Whats that word say or whats that letter or how do you make that letter.3.To see if the child is ready teach him/her to write or pronounce one or more sounds. Does he/she want to learn , seem interested in learning them? or does the child resist? '


its worked for the kids i teach, also how long are you making your sons lessons? since he had adhd maybe the time should only be 5-10 min. at first work up to a longer lesson time. maybe make it more hands on for him also, make some flash cards with the letter on it so he can pick it up, etc.  abeka is a good program but maybe you need to adjust how they teach a bit to your sons learning




He wants to read for sure. He is very interested in letters and our phonetic program takes 15 mins or so a day. He just is struggle with mixing letters and sounds up. He does the same with numbers. He can count high but if you ask him to count 4 objects and show you the number 4 out of a line 1-4, he very well might pick up 3 and not 4. It's more of a visual thing I believe.
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oredeb
by debbie on May. 23, 2012 at 11:13 AM

 as for counting another thing i learned is  kids that young need to see what they are counting, it needs to be objects in hand, and it takes practice for a bit ,

Quoting SouthernLadyRTR:

Quoting oredeb:

 




He wants to read for sure. He is very interested in letters and our phonetic program takes 15 mins or so a day. He just is struggle with mixing letters and sounds up. He does the same with numbers. He can count high but if you ask him to count 4 objects and show you the number 4 out of a line 1-4, he very well might pick up 3 and not 4. It's more of a visual thing I believe.

 

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on May. 23, 2012 at 11:43 AM

 First I would say he may be too young, but if he's asking and you feel he's ready try using flash cards with the uppercase letters on them.  Go through them in order using the letter names then go through them using the letter name followed by the letter sound. Repeat over and over again.  Don't focus on specific letters.

Also use picture words and finger stretching.  Show pictures of a dog and finger stretch /d/  /o/ /g/.  Cheese  /ch/  /e/ /z/.  Don't associate with the letters yet.  That will come better later.  Once he is able to hear the seperate sounds in the words he uses.

bugayfamilyof4
by Member on May. 23, 2012 at 11:46 AM

Have you look on ABCmouse.com. My Ava 5 loves it. You can set it for 2 to 6 years old. Also Starfall.com is cool. He might like the computer better then seat work at this age.

romacox
by Silver Member on May. 23, 2012 at 1:03 PM

The Conventional method of teaching phonics teaches only to the left brain.  But when you involve the body, brain and senses in the learning (Total Physical Response), children learn faster, retain more, and retain their love for learning.  This is effective for all learning styles, but particularly with the hands on learners, analytical personalities, active children, and children with ADHD.  There is such curriculum available at the following link:

How To Home School (Home school is not the classroom)

Also I am a tutor and home school workshop leader.  I am given the children that are having difficulties learning to read.  I have discovered that nine times out of ten they are are pronouncing their phonic sounds incorrectly causing them problems blending them to form words.  The following video explains how to easily correct that.

Keep us all informed.  These kids are important, and there is plenty of people here willing and able to help.

JKronrod
by Bronze Member on May. 23, 2012 at 1:17 PM

I know this is heresy, but given that he WANTS to read, have you tried "see-say" or "whole word" (i.e., teach certain words, and then have him read the story that contains those words)? 

See-say doesn't do a very good job of teaching how to spell, and it's one of those "popular" techniques from the sixties that subsequently became "discredited".  Here's the thing, though.  I have four children.  They learned to read in different ways.  My first used phonics (from about age four).  My second did see-say (starting from age three).  My third tried to "read from context" (another discredited theory).  And the fourth is doing phonics again (started at age four).  

The problem, I think, is that we expect one way to work for all children.   For MOST children starting with phonics is the best way.  Then, they ultimately move from decoding with phonics to reading "whole words" something like see-say.  And, they anticipate the next words from context. My point is that all fluent readers use all three "skills."  But I believe that some children are "wired" to learn one of the other skills earlier/better, etc.   By forcing phonics all we do is convence them that they can't read (or are dumb, or whatever). 

Ultimately, your son will need phonics (and I recommend the "Phonics Game" -- expensive, but if you have more than one child very effective and worth it).  But there would be nothing wrong in trying a different method, get him reading whole words, and then, in a year or so, trying phonics again so that he can get the decoding and spelling skills down.

Good luck! 

ImmiNan
by on May. 23, 2012 at 1:19 PM

I agree with this. Boys get excited about counting Lego's. Using Lego's for math is a great idea. You can put a letter on a stuffed animal and the child will most likely remember that letter,  or you can do this with a number. It's yet another way to learn.

Quoting oredeb:

 as for counting another thing i learned is  kids that young need to see what they are counting, it needs to be objects in hand, and it takes practice for a bit ,

Quoting SouthernLadyRTR:

Quoting oredeb:

 




He wants to read for sure. He is very interested in letters and our phonetic program takes 15 mins or so a day. He just is struggle with mixing letters and sounds up. He does the same with numbers. He can count high but if you ask him to count 4 objects and show you the number 4 out of a line 1-4, he very well might pick up 3 and not 4. It's more of a visual thing I believe.

 


SouthernLadyRTR
by on May. 23, 2012 at 2:11 PM
Quoting oredeb:


I didn't really explain the number issue right. He counts objects perfectly! He loves to count, but it's the number recognition he struggles with. The actually sight of the number. I can't show him number 4 and ask him which number it is, he won't know. But he can count well past 4.
Similair with the letters. It's the sight and name recognition he struggles with. He can tell you what I says and what U says, but if you put an I and a U in front of him, he can't seem to remember which is I and which is U.

Does that make better sense? He is in speech therapy once a week. She thinks it is an ADHD issue, but if that's the case now do you ever teach them...? He so desperately wants to read =((

Side note: His 3 yr old brother is in speech and occupational therapy once a week. He is being tested for Autism. I have a long road ahead of me with these sweeties and I just want to make sure I try anything that might help them. I buy curriculum like crazy because I get nervous something isn't working. My husband might lose it if I buy yet another curriculum. At this point I have all the Rod and Staff preschool/kindergarten books, all of Abeka K4/K5, Sonlight p 3/4 and p 4/5, Handwriting w/o Tears Pre-K, and a ton of supplement games, workbooks, iPad apps, computer games. These boys have so much attheir disposal. I'm starting to lose faith in my abilities. I homeschooled my older daughter, so I know I'm capable. Lol
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