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Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

"Case Against Homeschooling"

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O, while perusing the net this morning, I came across this blog post. I must point out the original post has been removed by the author, who apparently tucked tail and ran into hiding from us non-socialized Hs families. But I found her arguments to be very common in the non-Hs community. So I thought we could discuss some responses so we will all be well armed if ever faced w/ such ignorance in real life!

Shannon

CASE AGAINST HOMESCHOOLING
http://www.freerepublic.com/~aberaussie/

Homeschooling: Great for self-aggrandizing, society-phobic mother...not quite so good for The kid.

Here are my top ten reasons why homeschooling parents are doing the wrong thing:

10) "You were totally homeschooled!" Is an insult college kids use to insult the geeky kid in the dorm (whether or not the offender was homeschooled or not). And.... Say what you will... But it doesn't feel nice to be considered an outsider, a natural outcropping of being homeschooled.

9) Call me old-fashioned, But a students' classroom shouldn't be where they eat Fruit Loops and meatloaf (not at the same time I hope). It also shouldn't be where the family gathers to watch American Idol or to play Wii. Students - from little ones to teens- deserve a learning-focused place to study. In modern society, we call them schools.

8) Homeschooling is selfish. According to this article in USA Today, students who get homeschooled are increasingly from wealthy and well-educated families. To take these (I'm assuming) high achieving students out of our schools is a disservice to our less fortunate public schooled kids. Poorer students with less literate parents are more reliant on peer support and motivation, and they benefit greatly from the focus and commitment of their richer and higher Achieving classmates.

7) God hates homeschooling. The study, done by the National Center for Education Statistics, notes that the most common reason parents gave as the most important reason was a desire for religious or moral instruction. To the homeschooling Believers out there, didn't God say, "Go therefore and make disciples of all nations"? Didn't he command, "Ye shall be witness unto me"? From my side, to take your faithful children out of schools is to miss an opportunity to spread the grace, power and beauty of the Lord to the common people. (Personally I'm agnostic, but I'm just saying...)

6) Homeschooling parent/teachers are arrogant to the point of lunacy. For real! My qualifications to teach English include a double major in English and Education, two master's degrees (education and journalism), a student teaching semester and multiple internship terms, real world experience as a writer, and years in the classroom dealing with different learning styles. So, first of all, homeschooling parent, you think you can teach English as well as me? Well, maybe you can. I'll give you that. But there's no way you can teach English as good as me, and Biology as well as a trained professional, and history....and Spanish....and art...and counsel for college as well as a schools guidance counselor....and....and....

5) As a teacher, homeschooling pisses me off. (that's good enough for a #5)

4) Homeschooling could breed interolance, maybe even racism. Unless the student is being homeschooled in the MTV's Real World house, there's probably only one race/sexuality/background in the room. How can a young person learn to appreciate other cultures if he or she doesn't live amount them?

3) And don't give me this "they still participate in activities with public schooled kids" garbage. Socialization in our grand multi-cultural experiment we call America is a process that takes more than an hour a day, a few times a week. Homeschooling, undoubtably, leaves the child unprepared socially.

2) Homeschooling parents are arrogant, part II. According to Henry Cate, who runs the Why Homeschool blog, many highly educated, high-income parents, are "probably people who are a little bit more comfortable in taking risks" in choosing a college or line of work. "The attributes that facilitate at might also facilitate them being more comfortable with homeschooling."
More comfortable taking risks on their child's education? Gamble on, I don't know, the Super Bowl, not your child's future!

1) And finally.....Have you evr met someone who was homeschooled? Not to hate, but they do tend to be pretty geeky. **

**Please see comments for thoughts on the word 'geeky'. But, in general, to be geeky connotes a certain inability to integrate and communicate in diverse social situations. Which, I would argue, is a likely result from being educated in an environment without peers. It's hard to get by in such a diverse world as ours! And the more people you can hang out with the more likely you are to succeed, in both work and life.

 Home Educators Toolbox  / Articles / Kicbuttmama's Crazy Lapbooks / Kickbuttmama's Home Education
Albert Einstein -- 
   "Everybody is a Genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will spend its whole life believing it is stupid." 

by on Jun. 1, 2012 at 10:15 AM
Replies (21-30):
KickButtMama
by Shannon on Jun. 1, 2012 at 4:42 PM
Quoting ablessedlife:


#2 does not make any sense. Highly educated, high income parents are going to be the last ones to take risks with their children's education. They are going to do what they can to make sure their children get high quality education.



I agree!! I think, if there even is a real correlation between highly educated people being more prone to choose alternative forms of education, it is not because they are more willing to choose risky ventures but because they feel more confident in their own knowledge and feel they can guide their children into achieving the same success.

I know of NO ONE who sees HS (or private or public school for that matter) as a 'gamble' - I find hat an insulting and ignorant assertion.
Tal0n
by Member on Jun. 1, 2012 at 4:57 PM

Wealthy???  YEAH RIGHT.  I'm disabled and can't get disability and Dh has been laid off more times than I can count in the 12 years of Chibi's life.  We make her education a PRIORITY...and that means applying for scholarships and asking if there are ways she can do a certain thing if it's expensive and Grandpa pays for her Y membership so she can take classes and go to camp there (he also sometimes pays for the classes and camps!!)

My lover is a professer and my sibling is also.  My sib tested Chibi when she was 5 (and our parents were still giving us a hard time about homeschooling) and found her reading and vocab and comprehension exceeded the 6th grade level.  When it comes to academics, sib doesn't play.  Sibling (is transgender so I try to use gender neutral terms) said there was only one school in our state that would be a good fit for Chibi, and as it is far far out of our reach, s/he completely supported our decision.  And backed us with the parentals, who in the 7 yrs since have backed off.

"Everyone knows Chibi" is a catch phrase in our "community."  We live in a medium city, but the programs and places we tend to go...everyone knows Chibi.  It's pretty awesome since I worried in the beginning.  I'm from a small town and went to pre-school with the same kids I graduated with.  It's nice to see Chibi have some of the same community feeling I had.

irvinehiker
by Andrea on Jun. 1, 2012 at 5:56 PM

I'm not even done reading the list yet and I'm completely astounded that people are this ignorant!!!!!!

Boobah
by Nikki :) on Jun. 1, 2012 at 6:16 PM
Thanks for the giggles :)
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
KickButtMama
by Shannon on Jun. 1, 2012 at 7:36 PM
1 mom liked this
Quoting Boobah:Thanks for the giggles :)



Man, I have gotten no end to the enjoyment from the moment I first read this rubbish a t 9 o'clock this morning...lol....

I especially love that she calls Hs'ers arrogant then goes on to toot her educational credits horn (in poor grammar, too!) the poor grammar thing killed me. I am terrible with grammar and spelling. But I was a scientist NOT a professed expert in all things writing. If you went to her blog, she is pointed out for her glaring grammatical errors. You know what her response was. "It sounds stuffy and elitist" (when written correctly) seriously, I couldn't make this stuff up!
KickButtMama
by Shannon on Jun. 1, 2012 at 7:45 PM
Another rediculous article, stateing a similar sentiment - http://voices.yahoo.com/the-case-against-home-schooling-525763.html?cat=25
JKronrod
by Bronze Member on Jun. 1, 2012 at 11:18 PM

Much as all this is amusing, I have to say that after reading her blog on the subject, I do think that this was a case of trying to be "funny" and/or "satire," but just doing a really, really bad job of it (we'll leave aside that this woman is a public school teacher whose job it is to teach children to write  -- I guess not everyone can be Swift).  Unfortunately, so many of these are only slightly more exaggerated versions of what people actually believe.....

LostTheSlipper
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by Member on Jun. 2, 2012 at 12:10 AM

That last line in #6 is a joke.

I was a PS kid who took the PSATs without even know what the heck they were or why I was taking them other than I was in honors and AP classes and everyone else was talking about them so I thought I'd better do it too. I saw my guidance counselor maybe a total of 3 times for about 10 mins each year to schedule my next year's classes. Counsel for college? I figured it all out myself and knew the course booklet better than even my college guidance counselors by the time I was done with all my research on what I had to take and what I didn't have to take. I think if my son needed the help I could adequately help him.


And obviously the rest of it just makes me want to say a bunch of stuff but you guys have probably said most of it, and that one stood out for me as a new one I haven't heard yet.

KickButtMama
by Shannon on Jun. 2, 2012 at 8:59 AM
Quoting LostTheSlipper:

That last line in #6 is a joke.

I was a PS kid who took the PSATs without even know what the heck they were or why I was taking them other than I was in honors and AP classes and everyone else was talking about them so I thought I'd better do it too. I saw my guidance counselor maybe a total of 3 times for about 10 mins each year to schedule my next year's classes. Counsel for college? I figured it all out myself and knew the course booklet better than even my college guidance counselors by the time I was done with all my research on what I had to take and what I didn't have to take. I think if my son needed the help I could adequately help him.

And obviously the rest of it just makes me want to say a bunch of stuff but you guys have probably said most of it, and that one stood out for me as a new one I haven't heard yet.




I was in all college pre courses. I developed migranes as a junior. When I was informed that I had missed too many days - even w/ the doctor notes- and would probably have to repeat the year; my guidance counselor encouraged me to drop out! He handed me all the paperwork and explained that since to was 16 I didn't need a parents approval. I walked the halls with those forms the rest of the day, in a complete daze. He was 'sooo helpful' in preparing me for college!
KickButtMama
by Shannon on Jun. 2, 2012 at 9:05 AM
Quoting JKronrod:

Much as all this is amusing, I have to say that after reading her blog on the subject, I do think that this was a case of trying to be "funny" and/or "satire," but just doing a really, really bad job of it (we'll leave aside that this woman is a public school teacher whose job it is to teach children to write  -- I guess not everyone can be Swift).  Unfortunately, so many of these are only slightly more exaggerated versions of what people actually believe.....




Ah, see, it seems to me that she is NOW saying "but, it was all a joke!" because she got thousands of rebuttal replies. If you read through the replies on her blog, she Defends what she posted - not once saying "I'm sorry, it was a joke!" I mean, never do you see someone saying a joke yet using quotes from new articles and other 'experts.' And, like you said, these are not that far from what lots of PS'ers have believed/said. That's why I accused her of back peddling. Now, all of a sudden, she is treating HS'ers like real teachers; but no one makes the remarks - trying to be funny or not - who says all this without firmly believing it.

 Home Educators Toolbox  / Articles / Kicbuttmama's Crazy Lapbooks / Kickbuttmama's Home Education
Albert Einstein -- 
   "Everybody is a Genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will spend its whole life believing it is stupid." 

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