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What games do YOU use to teach your child(ren)?

Posted by on Jun. 2, 2012 at 12:55 AM
  • 11 Replies

 I don't really teach with games perse(sp?),  but I am wondering if I should start using some with my next 2 that I need to start teaching this coming school year. They are definitely high-spirited kids who love to learn very quickly. If it doesn't go fast, they aren't interested in it. 

 What games do you utilize when teaching your child(ren)?

by on Jun. 2, 2012 at 12:55 AM
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Replies (1-10):
romacox
by Silver Member on Jun. 2, 2012 at 7:10 AM

Hi again Kirbymom.  I am very big on games.

  • A simple walk can turn into a lesson on sequencing
  • Cooking together can turn into a lesson in measuring and reading comprehension
  • Mother May I can be used to teach various things
  • I use Ring Around The Phonics to turn just about anything into a game...even workbooks
  • To teach Comprehension, I allow the kids to create act out what they are reading
Moma3boyz
by on Jun. 2, 2012 at 8:32 AM
I used any board games. Before they took their turns they would have to answer a math problem or spell or read a word.
I also used mother may I and simon says when they were little.
My kids also love anything on the computer. I have bought a couple of games from sams club. One is spelling and I can put their word list in. the other its a general k-6th. They still play it, but for uhf older two it is mostly review. There are a couple of games I downloaded on line. Google free math games, or reading games. There are a ton and the ones I got you can play off line so you dont have to worry if they might click on an ad and see who knows what.
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KickButtMama
by Shannon on Jun. 2, 2012 at 9:12 AM
We do a version of 4 Square (ball bouncing) for spelling & vocabulary, we've done Bingo for math and science facts.

We've played the Pokemon card game to build reading skill and math. And Rummy Up UNO for critical thinking skills.
SilentDraconia
by on Jun. 2, 2012 at 9:21 AM
Math bingo. Word bingo, word shark, hi ho cherry o life monopoly mad libs and a bunch others.
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Danielle163
by on Jun. 2, 2012 at 9:30 AM

 We play Monopoly, Yahtzee, Hangman Word Play, etc. I'm looking into the games from RRC to teach Geography. We need help in the area.

ablessedlife
by Member on Jun. 2, 2012 at 10:06 AM
For math and literacy games, check out this site:
http://www.boxcarsandoneeyedjacks.com/
oredeb
by on Jun. 2, 2012 at 12:06 PM

 i have a game that i use for all the subjects, i have to make it up for what we are doing, called 'concentration'

its great for learning math facts, matching, vocab words, history and science facts etc

i use index cards to make the games (and its cheap!)

another game we love to play is bingo , capital/state bingo, etc

another game online we use is owl and mouse games (using them for 14 or so years, part of our curr.) fantastic site! http://www.yourchildlearns.com/owlmouse.htm

 

 

lucsch
by on Jun. 3, 2012 at 1:10 PM

Really, learning can happen with any game! Any game will teach your child how to follow instructions, play by the rules, and taking turns.

Uncle Wiggly's game is great for number sense, sequencing, adding, subtracting. It is a very simple games little kids who have outgrown games like candy land will like,  especially if you also read the storybook with the same name. They will love the animal characters.

Chutes and Ladders is also great for number sense 1-100.

Games with dice can help them with addition facts and  a visual sense of numbers.

Older kids will enjoy Yatzhee. It has multi-digit addition and introduces the idea of combinations and sequences, as well as, sets.

Numbers Sequence is a fun board game for addition/subtraction.

There are several variations on United States geography board games that you can buy that can help teach states, location, capitals, and interesting information.

Look through the "educational games" on amazon for ideas.

Scholastic sells ebooks (watch for $1 sale) with learning games of all sorts that you can print out on your printer.

bether89
by Bronze Member on Jun. 3, 2012 at 2:21 PM

My son and I have made file folder games using stickers.  You can make cards for any subject to go along with the folders.  I let my son make up the rules, like, If you land on a yellow sticker, you must answer a question correctly to move the number rolled on dice.  Sometimes we have a free space where there is no question.  We have used the folder games for spelling, math, science, history, and etc.  You can make a folder games and use it for multiple subject just by changing the question cards.

KickButtMama
by Shannon on Jun. 3, 2012 at 3:33 PM
Quoting Danielle163:

 We play Monopoly, Yahtzee, Hangman Word Play, etc. I'm looking into the games from RRC to teach Geography. We need help in the area.




What is RPC? For geography we have used apps and the kids made lapbooks like travel brochures for the state/country of the week. When my kids were younger (pre-k-2nd grade) I made a monkey out of felt called Mike The Monkey and each week Mike would travel to a new location, the kids had to make the travel arrangements (how would he get from one place to another - boat, car, train, plane, etc), they would also pack his suitcase with clothing appropriate to the climate. Then they would make post cards from the location for Mike to send to our families with little tidbits about the local. They LOVED it, I think we went with it for about a year.

 Home Educators Toolbox  / Articles / Kicbuttmama's Crazy Lapbooks / Kickbuttmama's Home Education
Albert Einstein -- 
   "Everybody is a Genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will spend its whole life believing it is stupid." 

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