Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

How do you keep them from getting bored?

Posted by on Jun. 2, 2012 at 9:31 AM
  • 12 Replies

I have a child who isn't quite 4 yet.  We are using Abeka Academy's K4 program with her.  She is light years ahead when it comes to reading.  She is reading at more than an entry Kindergarten level.  I am concerned that she will be bored with her phonics program once we start her K5 program in January.  We have chosen this program for very specific reasons and want to continue to use it.


Does anyone have any suggestions on how to keep her from becoming bored in reading and phonics?  If I need to supplement with another program I will do that.

by on Jun. 2, 2012 at 9:31 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
chotovec82
by Bronze Member on Jun. 2, 2012 at 9:51 AM

Incorporate other reading programs into it? It's relatively easy to get Christian based reading programs. Or if you are doing independent study program then you could get the next level up for her in reading.

ablessedlife
by Member on Jun. 2, 2012 at 10:00 AM
Quoting chotovec82:

Incorporate other reading programs into it? It's relatively easy to get Christian based reading programs. Or if you are doing independent study program then you could get the next level up for her in reading.



Your profile pic is adorable. (I have four boys.)
chotovec82
by Bronze Member on Jun. 2, 2012 at 10:06 AM

Thanks! That picture is over  a year old. I should probably update it soon. :)

Quoting ablessedlife:

Quoting chotovec82:

Incorporate other reading programs into it? It's relatively easy to get Christian based reading programs. Or if you are doing independent study program then you could get the next level up for her in reading.



Your profile pic is adorable. (I have four boys.)


KickButtMama
by Shannon on Jun. 2, 2012 at 10:17 AM
I agree, try other reading programs. Honestly that is all I've got for advice, I could never get my kids to stick to a single curriculum w/o getting bored. So we change things up from week to week.
oredeb
by on Jun. 2, 2012 at 11:32 AM

 hi coala,

dont follow their lesson plans, use abeka but make up your own, tweak it! make it so that its fun, and enjoyable,

coala
by Silver Member on Jun. 2, 2012 at 7:25 PM

We used the Academy for our oldest (who is my niece) and she thrived on the program.  It is taught by a teacher via DVD or streaming on the internet.  It was PHENOMENAL for us.  My 3 yo was involved in just sitting and watchig, but not actually doing the lessons--we had to stop at lesson 60 before my sister pulled her from our care and the program and then placed her in public school.  The main reason we picked this program is because it is accredited and we heard so many good things about it.  I think that I will just have to add to her curriculum and keep it interesting for her.  Thanks for the advice ladies.

romacox
by Silver Member on Jun. 3, 2012 at 9:38 AM

Teaching to left and right brain makes it easy to keep children interested.  Here is an article that explains how to do that:  Total Physical Response

If you do decide to supplement, I recommend the language arts Curriculum, Ring Around The Phonics. It engages the body, senses and brain (Total Physical Response).

lucsch
by on Jun. 3, 2012 at 12:54 PM
1 mom liked this

My dd just figured it all out right in the midst of our phonics program, too. I had her still do phonics,  because I think there is still value in teaching the rules; but I also let her check out library books to read at her higher level. Phonics was just a small part of our day. She was reading chapter books in the 2nd half of Kindergarten, while our actual readers were simple Dr. Suess or Little Bear type books. She enjoyed them even though they were easy. By first grade, she was reading some of our read-alouds--we would switch back and forth--like Dr. Dolittle or The Wizard of Oz. It worked, and she wasn't bored at all. I understand that aBeka is probably in a workbook format. Fortunately, our phonics was not totally (we did use the ETC workbooks, but they were fast), so she did not have to go through what might look like "busy work" to your daughter. Perhaps you can just have her do some of the work, as you see fit.

gratefulgal
by Member on Jun. 3, 2012 at 2:17 PM

 

Quoting lucsch:

My dd just figured it all out right in the midst of our phonics program, too. I had her still do phonics,  because I think there is still value in teaching the rules; but I also let her check out library books to read at her higher level. Phonics was just a small part of our day. She was reading chapter books in the 2nd half of Kindergarten, while our actual readers were simple Dr. Suess or Little Bear type books. She enjoyed them even though they were easy. By first grade, she was reading some of our read-alouds--we would switch back and forth--like Dr. Dolittle or The Wizard of Oz. It worked, and she wasn't bored at all. I understand that aBeka is probably in a workbook format. Fortunately, our phonics was not totally (we did use the ETC workbooks, but they were fast), so she did not have to go through what might look like "busy work" to your daughter. Perhaps you can just have her do some of the work, as you see fit.


We are in the exact same boat! Our Kindergartener could read any book you put in front of him. But I was scared to stop the phonics program because of possible gaps in learning ALL the phonics. I wanted "play by the rules" to be sure that he could not only read good, but continue making progress in his reading. Basically, I was sacred he would miss something important. And he is just four, so I knew that he was young, too. I think sometimes it just clicks for them. So we, too, are sticking with the curriculum, especially because it teaches about nouns, verbs, punctuation, etc, and we are already 1/2 through it.  We check out a TON of books from the library, and have been able to purchase quite a few on sale over the past few years, so I have him read anything he can. We use Horizons from Alpha Omega, by the way.

Workbook style curriculums are usually loaded with writing exercises. Since your DD is so young, so much writing can be overwhelming. So I cut the writing some and just let him read. I would stick with the curriculum. Will she be 5 in January? Maybe you could check out the curriculum for 1st grade reading, and just add in the K math. I'm not sure how the K4 and K5 are in similarities. My main concern with skipping up to 1st grade is all the extra writing that comes with that. She may be writing well now, but get very overwhelmed at the extent of writing at 1st grade. Or get some 1st or 2nd grade workbooks from Walmart or Sams' and use for fun. But your best bet is to add in all the books you can, and just see how "high" she can read. I'd give her anything she wanted to read and let her have at it.

For every book she reads, she's learning and learning and learning. Also, it might be fun to look into some summer reading programs for her. Some even give points for you reading to her. Also, you could do Book IT from pizza hut (http://www.bookit.com/).

coala
by Silver Member on Jun. 3, 2012 at 6:51 PM

We have both curriculums at home.  We have the K5 b/c my niece started kindergarten last fall and we purchased K4 when our DD seemed ready for it.  She won't be 5 until the end of NEXT June.  She is 4 weeks from her birthday.  The phonics  program with the academy is 30 min each day.  It won't be long.  We will probably "play by the rules" so to speak until she gets the "true" foundation.  Thanks for all of your support and encrouagement ladies.

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)