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Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

What is you favorite curriculum for you kids?

Posted by on Jun. 9, 2012 at 6:35 PM
  • 23 Replies

I am considering starting to homeschool my daughter. She is going into second grade. Is there a test you give them to see what level they should be in? What is your favorite curriculum? If you want your child to have a Christian education do you have to get a Christian curriculum?

by on Jun. 9, 2012 at 6:35 PM
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Replies (1-10):
kcangel63
by on Jun. 9, 2012 at 6:35 PM
We use acellus.com
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
abigailesmommy
by on Jun. 9, 2012 at 6:41 PM

Is it expensive?

Quoting kcangel63:

We use acellus.com


kcangel63
by on Jun. 9, 2012 at 6:47 PM
It's $30 a month. You can also get a free trial to try it out. My kids love it.

Quoting abigailesmommy:

Is it expensive?

Quoting kcangel63:

We use acellus.com


Posted on CafeMom Mobile
NYCitymomx3
by Bronze Member on Jun. 9, 2012 at 6:50 PM

Many curriculums offer a placement test.  Many don't, though and sometimes you just go with your gut based on what you know she can do.  Most 2nd grade curriculums are for the average 2nd grader and there are some that are accelerated.  You can choose a Christian-based one or a secular one and add in your own Christian studies.

My favorite right now is a pared down and tweaked version of a Charlotte Mason based curriculum called Ambleside Online.  It's a Christian curriculum that we use secularly.  It's focus is on classic literature, history, and nature, but it does cover all subjects (we choose our own math program - which I prefer).  The Charlotte Mason method incorporates ideas such as short lessons, afternoons free, handicrafts, and lots of outdoor time.   It's rigorous and thorough, yet gentle and fun.

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KickButtMama
by Shannon on Jun. 9, 2012 at 7:20 PM
1 mom liked this
I design my own curriculum and I often base it on the World Book encyclopedia typical course of study by grade level. One of the beautiful things about HS is that you don't have to box a student into a specific grade, you can allow them to flourish ahead in subjects that are their strong suits, and pace them slower in their more difficult subjects.
KickButtMama
by Shannon on Jun. 9, 2012 at 7:22 PM
We absolutely loved www.time4learning.com for 2nd grade. It's only $20/month and it's super interactive, so it grabs the students attention.
abigailesmommy
by on Jun. 9, 2012 at 7:23 PM

Thanks for the tip. Is there any cost? I didn't see one listed on the site. 

Quoting NYCitymomx3:

Many curriculums offer a placement test.  Many don't, though and sometimes you just go with your gut based on what you know she can do.  Most 2nd grade curriculums are for the average 2nd grader and there are some that are accelerated.  You can choose a Christian-based one or a secular one and add in your own Christian studies.

My favorite right now is a pared down and tweaked version of a Charlotte Mason based curriculum called Ambleside Online.  It's a Christian curriculum that we use secularly.  It's focus is on classic literature, history, and nature, but it does cover all subjects (we choose our own math program - which I prefer).  The Charlotte Mason method incorporates ideas such as short lessons, afternoons free, handicrafts, and lots of outdoor time.   It's rigorous and thorough, yet gentle and fun.


Please check out my blog here.

abigailesmommy
by on Jun. 9, 2012 at 7:25 PM
2 moms liked this

That's why I love the idea of home school. My daughter was getting in trouble at school because she was finishing a lot of her work before her friends, but then when it came to reading she was behind and not finishing her work on time. She was getting upset and felt like a failure. I want her to have an education focused on her needs and interests. 

Quoting KickButtMama:

I design my own curriculum and I often base it on the World Book encyclopedia typical course of study by grade level. One of the beautiful things about HS is that you don't have to box a student into a specific grade, you can allow them to flourish ahead in subjects that are their strong suits, and pace them slower in their more difficult subjects.


NYCitymomx3
by Bronze Member on Jun. 9, 2012 at 8:52 PM
1 mom liked this

It's as cheap as you want it to be.  Just get all of the "living books" listed for your year.  I buy some books used, some on my Nook, download many free onto the Nook, and find many free online.  The math program I'm getting this year will be less than $30.  The artist pictures and composer works are found free online.  Our nature study follows a blog called The Outdoor Hour Challenge -  I purchase a sketchbook, magnifying glass, and colored pencils at the dollar store.  All notebooks, pens, pencils, art supplies, rulers, etc are bought in July when Target and Staples have the huge back to school sales.  I bought a nice poetry anthology ($3.99) and a gigantic book of complete Shakespeare plays ($7.99) at Barnes & Noble in the discount bins.

An entire year of curriculum for one child costs me less than $250.

(well, one year I did spend $120 on a math curriculum.  I just wanted to try it and see what all the hype was about.  Ds didn't even use the CD Roms it came with and dropped it altogether after a few months.)

If you're considering it, start her in Year 1 for second grade.  It is very accelerated.  My ds is going into 6th grade and we're using Year 4.  Read every page you can on the AO website before you start any of it.  It will really open your eyes to a wonderful learning method.


Quoting abigailesmommy:

Thanks for the tip. Is there any cost? I didn't see one listed on the site. 

Quoting NYCitymomx3:

Many curriculums offer a placement test.  Many don't, though and sometimes you just go with your gut based on what you know she can do.  Most 2nd grade curriculums are for the average 2nd grader and there are some that are accelerated.  You can choose a Christian-based one or a secular one and add in your own Christian studies.

My favorite right now is a pared down and tweaked version of a Charlotte Mason based curriculum called Ambleside Online.  It's a Christian curriculum that we use secularly.  It's focus is on classic literature, history, and nature, but it does cover all subjects (we choose our own math program - which I prefer).  The Charlotte Mason method incorporates ideas such as short lessons, afternoons free, handicrafts, and lots of outdoor time.   It's rigorous and thorough, yet gentle and fun.



abigailesmommy
by on Jun. 9, 2012 at 9:36 PM

You said afternoons free, about how many hours do you end up working on stuff. I know for Mo we have to do 600 hrs core classes with an additional 400. I am sure that sounds like a lot more hours than it really is. Do you mind me asking what math program you are thinking of. 

Quoting NYCitymomx3:

It's as cheap as you want it to be.  Just get all of the "living books" listed for your year.  I buy some books used, some on my Nook, download many free onto the Nook, and find many free online.  The math program I'm getting this year will be less than $30.  The artist pictures and composer works are found free online.  Our nature study follows a blog called The Outdoor Hour Challenge -  I purchase a sketchbook, magnifying glass, and colored pencils at the dollar store.  All notebooks, pens, pencils, art supplies, rulers, etc are bought in July when Target and Staples have the huge back to school sales.  I bought a nice poetry anthology ($3.99) and a gigantic book of complete Shakespeare plays ($7.99) at Barnes & Noble in the discount bins.

An entire year of curriculum for one child costs me less than $250.

(well, one year I did spend $120 on a math curriculum.  I just wanted to try it and see what all the hype was about.  Ds didn't even use the CD Roms it came with and dropped it altogether after a few months.)

If you're considering it, start her in Year 1 for second grade.  It is very accelerated.  My ds is going into 6th grade and we're using Year 4.  Read every page you can on the AO website before you start any of it.  It will really open your eyes to a wonderful learning method.


Quoting abigailesmommy:

Thanks for the tip. Is there any cost? I didn't see one listed on the site. 

Quoting NYCitymomx3:

Many curriculums offer a placement test.  Many don't, though and sometimes you just go with your gut based on what you know she can do.  Most 2nd grade curriculums are for the average 2nd grader and there are some that are accelerated.  You can choose a Christian-based one or a secular one and add in your own Christian studies.

My favorite right now is a pared down and tweaked version of a Charlotte Mason based curriculum called Ambleside Online.  It's a Christian curriculum that we use secularly.  It's focus is on classic literature, history, and nature, but it does cover all subjects (we choose our own math program - which I prefer).  The Charlotte Mason method incorporates ideas such as short lessons, afternoons free, handicrafts, and lots of outdoor time.   It's rigorous and thorough, yet gentle and fun.




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