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I need some help planning a few projects!

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This will be our first year HS.  I have 2 9th graders and a kindergartner.  For the 9th graders, I am using Apologia for Science and Abeka for nearly everything else.  Anyway, I am going to need some projects for their Physical Science to help fill in some days.  I am required by our cover church (which is required in our state) to have 170 days of lessons.  There are only 16 modules in the course (about 4 modules per every 9 weeks).  I am already trying to plan our first 9 weeks of school work.  I am the type who has to have an organized lesson plan or I will go crazy..lol.

Anyway, I have already planned to do 5 modules in 7 weeks!  So, what I am thinking is after we do these 5 modules, I am going to let them do about 2-3 weeks worth of projects to help reinforce what they have learned.  The boys love doing things like this anyway so I figure it will be great to help fill in days and to help them enjoy it alot more.  They will do at least a one page report with each project that they do.

The first module is on atoms and molecules.  I thought about letting build a model of an atom or molecules.

Module 2 is about air.  It covers carbon dioxide, humidity, the idea of global warming, carbon monoxide, pollution, and the ozone layer.  I am not sure what to do here.  

Module 3 is about the Atmosphere.  It includes the Earth's layers.  So maybe they could do a model of the Earth's layers.

Module 4 is The Wonder of Water.  It basically covers everything water..I am not sure if there is anything I can really do with this that we won't be doing in experiments.

Module 5 is The Hydrosphere.  It covers water sources, the hydrolic cycle, ground water and soil moisture, surface water, atmospheric moisture, and water pollution.  I think for this they can do a nice drawing of the hydrolic cycle. 

I will only do 2 or 3.  I would give them a week to do each project (during normal classtime).

i would love to hear your thoughts and your ideas...thanks.

by on Jun. 20, 2012 at 7:16 PM
Replies (11-19):
kirbymom
by Sonja on Jun. 21, 2012 at 9:51 AM

                       Lemon Battery Project

Electricity: charge it and pass it on!
Materials

Materials Needed

  • different fruits and veggies, including a lemon
  • 2 pennies
  • 2 large paper clips
  • 3 pieces of copper wire
  • scissors
  • knife
  • voltmeter
  • battery-operated digital clock
  • pencil and paper
  • lots of friends or family members


Instructions

Instructions


  1. Check with an adult before you begin. This activity has two parts and you'll need lots of friends or family members for the second part.
  2. Follow the directions to make a Lemon Battery. Be sure to get help from an adult if you're not allowed to use a knife.
  3. Make the same cuts in the other fruits and vegetables that you'll be comparing to the lemon. The ZOOMers tried apples, oranges, potatoes and bananas, but you could try anything from kiwis to kumquats.
  4. Draw a chart for the predictions you'll make and the results you'll record. Write the names of the fruits and vegetables in rows along the left side of the page. In columns along the top of your page write "predicted voltage" and "actual voltage".
  5. Make some predictions. Which fruits or vegetables will produce a current? Based on the voltage produced by the lemon battery, how much voltage do you think each will produce? Which will be the strongest? The weakest? Write your predictions on your chart.
  6. Now, it's time to test your fruits and veggies.
  7. Attach the copper wires, pennies and paper clips to each fruit or vegetable following the instructions for Lemon Battery. Attach each of your batteries to a digital clock. Which ones can power the clock? Indicate these fruits and vegetables on your chart.
  8. Now, find out how strong a current each produces. Instead of attaching your fruit and veggie batteries to the clock, attach them to the voltmeter. Record the voltage produced by each battery on your chart.
  9. How do your predictions compare to your results? Why do you think your results were the same or different? Does the clock require a certain voltage to run? Share your results with the scientific community of other ZOOMers.
  10. Now you're ready for the second part, pass it on! This is when you'll need to get help from your lab assistants (your friends and family members). Put away the voltmeter and reattach your clock to the fruit battery.
  11. Cut your lemon, or whatever kind of fruit you're using for your battery, in half so that the penny is in one half and the paper clip in the other half. The clock should go out, since you've just disconnected the circuit.
  12. Now hold one half of the fruit in one hand and your lab assistant's hand in the other. Have your lab assistant hold the other half of the fruit in his or her free hand. Does the clock light up again? It should, since you and your lab assistant are now part of a complete circuit.
  13. Make a prediction about how many people the current will flow through and still power the clock.
  14. Keep adding lab assistants to the circuit until the clock no longer runs. How do your results compare with your predictions? Is there anything you can do to increase the conductivity (the flow of current) in your circuit of lab assistants?

    Which of your batteries do you think will power a clock the longest? Make a prediction, try out your batteries.
starbeck96
by Bronze Member on Jun. 21, 2012 at 9:58 AM
1 mom liked this

Cool!   We will definitely have to try this!!

Quoting kirbymom:

                       Lemon Battery Project

Electricity: charge it and pass it on!
Materials

Materials Needed

  • different fruits and veggies, including a lemon
  • 2 pennies
  • 2 large paper clips
  • 3 pieces of copper wire
  • scissors
  • knife
  • voltmeter
  • battery-operated digital clock
  • pencil and paper
  • lots of friends or family members


Instructions

Instructions


  1. Check with an adult before you begin. This activity has two parts and you'll need lots of friends or family members for the second part.
  2. Follow the directions to make a Lemon Battery. Be sure to get help from an adult if you're not allowed to use a knife.
  3. Make the same cuts in the other fruits and vegetables that you'll be comparing to the lemon. The ZOOMers tried apples, oranges, potatoes and bananas, but you could try anything from kiwis to kumquats.
  4. Draw a chart for the predictions you'll make and the results you'll record. Write the names of the fruits and vegetables in rows along the left side of the page. In columns along the top of your page write "predicted voltage" and "actual voltage".
  5. Make some predictions. Which fruits or vegetables will produce a current? Based on the voltage produced by the lemon battery, how much voltage do you think each will produce? Which will be the strongest? The weakest? Write your predictions on your chart.
  6. Now, it's time to test your fruits and veggies.
  7. Attach the copper wires, pennies and paper clips to each fruit or vegetable following the instructions for Lemon Battery. Attach each of your batteries to a digital clock. Which ones can power the clock? Indicate these fruits and vegetables on your chart.
  8. Now, find out how strong a current each produces. Instead of attaching your fruit and veggie batteries to the clock, attach them to the voltmeter. Record the voltage produced by each battery on your chart.
  9. How do your predictions compare to your results? Why do you think your results were the same or different? Does the clock require a certain voltage to run? Share your results with the scientific community of other ZOOMers.
  10. Now you're ready for the second part, pass it on! This is when you'll need to get help from your lab assistants (your friends and family members). Put away the voltmeter and reattach your clock to the fruit battery.
  11. Cut your lemon, or whatever kind of fruit you're using for your battery, in half so that the penny is in one half and the paper clip in the other half. The clock should go out, since you've just disconnected the circuit.
  12. Now hold one half of the fruit in one hand and your lab assistant's hand in the other. Have your lab assistant hold the other half of the fruit in his or her free hand. Does the clock light up again? It should, since you and your lab assistant are now part of a complete circuit.
  13. Make a prediction about how many people the current will flow through and still power the clock.
  14. Keep adding lab assistants to the circuit until the clock no longer runs. How do your results compare with your predictions? Is there anything you can do to increase the conductivity (the flow of current) in your circuit of lab assistants?

    Which of your batteries do you think will power a clock the longest? Make a prediction, try out your batteries.


kirbymom
by Sonja on Jun. 21, 2012 at 10:19 AM

 What with this being fairly simple, I thought it would get everyone involved. Including the parents.  :)

Quoting starbeck96:

Cool!   We will definitely have to try this!!

Quoting kirbymom:

                       Lemon Battery Project

Electricity: charge it and pass it on!
Materials

Materials Needed

  • different fruits and veggies, including a lemon
  • 2 pennies
  • 2 large paper clips
  • 3 pieces of copper wire
  • scissors
  • knife
  • voltmeter
  • battery-operated digital clock
  • pencil and paper
  • lots of friends or family members


Instructions

Instructions


  1. Check with an adult before you begin. This activity has two parts and you'll need lots of friends or family members for the second part.
  2. Follow the directions to make a Lemon Battery. Be sure to get help from an adult if you're not allowed to use a knife.
  3. Make the same cuts in the other fruits and vegetables that you'll be comparing to the lemon. The ZOOMers tried apples, oranges, potatoes and bananas, but you could try anything from kiwis to kumquats.
  4. Draw a chart for the predictions you'll make and the results you'll record. Write the names of the fruits and vegetables in rows along the left side of the page. In columns along the top of your page write "predicted voltage" and "actual voltage".
  5. Make some predictions. Which fruits or vegetables will produce a current? Based on the voltage produced by the lemon battery, how much voltage do you think each will produce? Which will be the strongest? The weakest? Write your predictions on your chart.
  6. Now, it's time to test your fruits and veggies.
  7. Attach the copper wires, pennies and paper clips to each fruit or vegetable following the instructions for Lemon Battery. Attach each of your batteries to a digital clock. Which ones can power the clock? Indicate these fruits and vegetables on your chart.
  8. Now, find out how strong a current each produces. Instead of attaching your fruit and veggie batteries to the clock, attach them to the voltmeter. Record the voltage produced by each battery on your chart.
  9. How do your predictions compare to your results? Why do you think your results were the same or different? Does the clock require a certain voltage to run? Share your results with the scientific community of other ZOOMers.
  10. Now you're ready for the second part, pass it on! This is when you'll need to get help from your lab assistants (your friends and family members). Put away the voltmeter and reattach your clock to the fruit battery.
  11. Cut your lemon, or whatever kind of fruit you're using for your battery, in half so that the penny is in one half and the paper clip in the other half. The clock should go out, since you've just disconnected the circuit.
  12. Now hold one half of the fruit in one hand and your lab assistant's hand in the other. Have your lab assistant hold the other half of the fruit in his or her free hand. Does the clock light up again? It should, since you and your lab assistant are now part of a complete circuit.
  13. Make a prediction about how many people the current will flow through and still power the clock.
  14. Keep adding lab assistants to the circuit until the clock no longer runs. How do your results compare with your predictions? Is there anything you can do to increase the conductivity (the flow of current) in your circuit of lab assistants?

    Which of your batteries do you think will power a clock the longest? Make a prediction, try out your batteries.

 

 

oredeb
by on Jun. 21, 2012 at 10:45 AM

 star are you going to have them do the lab reports also? that always helps my kids, going back over the project in their mind and getting it wrote down on paper so someone can understand what they wrote and it can help them understand what they did and why, we use those composition books,

KickButtMama
by Shannon on Jun. 21, 2012 at 11:01 AM
Quoting oredeb:

 star are you going to have them do the lab reports also? that always helps my kids, going back over the project in their mind and getting it wrote down on paper so someone can understand what they wrote and it can help them understand what they did and why, we use those composition books,



I, too, suggest having a lab notebook. I know they were important when I was in college. In them we would write out exactly what was involved in the experiment, a step by step of the experiment, our hypothesis, and the results/observations.

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   "Everybody is a Genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will spend its whole life believing it is stupid." 

TigerofMu
by Bronze Member on Jun. 21, 2012 at 11:59 AM

Plants are a great project for carbon dioxide and oxygen.  You could build some kind of model or environment comparison project.  

What about water cycle?  Is that already in experiments?  We did ice splitting, evaporation, freezing of salt and normal water...

The earth's layers was a fun model.


starbeck96
by Bronze Member on Jun. 21, 2012 at 12:40 PM

 

Quoting oredeb:

 star are you going to have them do the lab reports also? that always helps my kids, going back over the project in their mind and getting it wrote down on paper so someone can understand what they wrote and it can help them understand what they did and why, we use those composition books,


Yes, I am planning on having them do lab reports.  I figure this will make sure that they understand the experiment.

They are used to having to do lab reports anyway because they had to do them in PS.  They also used the composition books.

Thank you..

 

starbeck96
by Bronze Member on Jun. 21, 2012 at 12:44 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting TigerofMu:

Plants are a great project for carbon dioxide and oxygen.  You could build some kind of model or environment comparison project.  

What about water cycle?  Is that already in experiments?  We did ice splitting, evaporation, freezing of salt and normal water...

The earth's layers was a fun model.


Building a model or doing a comparison project is a great idea!

The water cycle is not a project in the book, but we had already planned to do some kind of project with it. 

I know they would really enjoy making a model of the earth's layers.  They love to build things and very artistic. 

starbeck96
by Bronze Member on Jun. 21, 2012 at 12:45 PM
1 mom liked this

I am planning on doing everything with them anyway.  I just would not feel right if I didn't at least observe them...lol.

Quoting kirbymom:

 What with this being fairly simple, I thought it would get everyone involved. Including the parents.  :)

Quoting starbeck96:

Cool!   We will definitely have to try this!!

Quoting kirbymom:

                       Lemon Battery Project

Electricity: charge it and pass it on!
Materials

Materials Needed

  • different fruits and veggies, including a lemon
  • 2 pennies
  • 2 large paper clips
  • 3 pieces of copper wire
  • scissors
  • knife
  • voltmeter
  • battery-operated digital clock
  • pencil and paper
  • lots of friends or family members


Instructions

Instructions


  1. Check with an adult before you begin. This activity has two parts and you'll need lots of friends or family members for the second part.
  2. Follow the directions to make a Lemon Battery. Be sure to get help from an adult if you're not allowed to use a knife.
  3. Make the same cuts in the other fruits and vegetables that you'll be comparing to the lemon. The ZOOMers tried apples, oranges, potatoes and bananas, but you could try anything from kiwis to kumquats.
  4. Draw a chart for the predictions you'll make and the results you'll record. Write the names of the fruits and vegetables in rows along the left side of the page. In columns along the top of your page write "predicted voltage" and "actual voltage".
  5. Make some predictions. Which fruits or vegetables will produce a current? Based on the voltage produced by the lemon battery, how much voltage do you think each will produce? Which will be the strongest? The weakest? Write your predictions on your chart.
  6. Now, it's time to test your fruits and veggies.
  7. Attach the copper wires, pennies and paper clips to each fruit or vegetable following the instructions for Lemon Battery. Attach each of your batteries to a digital clock. Which ones can power the clock? Indicate these fruits and vegetables on your chart.
  8. Now, find out how strong a current each produces. Instead of attaching your fruit and veggie batteries to the clock, attach them to the voltmeter. Record the voltage produced by each battery on your chart.
  9. How do your predictions compare to your results? Why do you think your results were the same or different? Does the clock require a certain voltage to run? Share your results with the scientific community of other ZOOMers.
  10. Now you're ready for the second part, pass it on! This is when you'll need to get help from your lab assistants (your friends and family members). Put away the voltmeter and reattach your clock to the fruit battery.
  11. Cut your lemon, or whatever kind of fruit you're using for your battery, in half so that the penny is in one half and the paper clip in the other half. The clock should go out, since you've just disconnected the circuit.
  12. Now hold one half of the fruit in one hand and your lab assistant's hand in the other. Have your lab assistant hold the other half of the fruit in his or her free hand. Does the clock light up again? It should, since you and your lab assistant are now part of a complete circuit.
  13. Make a prediction about how many people the current will flow through and still power the clock.
  14. Keep adding lab assistants to the circuit until the clock no longer runs. How do your results compare with your predictions? Is there anything you can do to increase the conductivity (the flow of current) in your circuit of lab assistants?

    Which of your batteries do you think will power a clock the longest? Make a prediction, try out your batteries.

 

 


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