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Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

Forgive my ignorance, but I just came upon this term and am curious.  I homeschool my 3 1/2 yr old son who is on the autism spectrum.  Hence, I'm pretty wrapped up in the specifics of teaching him, so don't always keep up on what others are doing, but would like to learn what "unschooling" is about.  Thanks.    

by on Jul. 20, 2012 at 6:56 PM
Replies (21-30):
pinkcookie019
by on Jul. 22, 2012 at 8:08 AM

Great answer! I'm not an unschooler. I'm a former homeschool mother. I've heard a lot of people bashing unschoolers, and I don't think it's fair. Just like homeschooling, you get out what you put into it! 

Quoting 4quivers:

If you could put it in a nutshell it's this. . .  To allow total freedom of your child to explore the world around them in whatever manner, topic, time frame, or pleasure.   If they want to study chemistry in 2nd grade you let them, with supervision of course.  Shakespeare in K, why not?   Your child wants to know what time it is?  There's a clock on the wall and you don't need a book to explain the details!  It's seeing what they are interested in and giving them whatever tools and resources you can find to fill their curiosity to their own hearts content. 

But, . . . . .  You can't put it in a nutshell because every nut is different!!!! 

To us it's more of a lifestyle as a whole family.  We each learn continuously, and share our thoughts, passions, and revelations.  It's the ultimate "Do-gooders" society!! 


DSC_0460asdf

my2.5boys
by on Jul. 22, 2012 at 11:31 AM
1 mom liked this

I'm a little late to this conversation, but I wanted to weigh in on a few things.

We are unschoolers. For us, this means there is nothing my children have to learn. They learn only what they want to learn, or what they are interested in. I do share things with them that I find interesting, or I will bring things to their attention that I think they will enjoy, but there is no coercion or forced cooperation in our home.

We have no schedule. In fact right now my children are getting on an opposite schedule as my husband and myself. They stay up all night, and sleep most of the day. The majority of their time is spent either playing video games, or watching youtube videos of others playing video games. This has been gong on now for a couple months, and I know what many people are probably thinking, "How are they possibly learning if all they do is play games?" But because I spend so much time with my kids, I can tell you they are learning plenty. Maybe not the same things they would be learning in school, but learning none-the-less. Their vocabularies and reading skills have sky rocketed, they've learned all about geology, land formations, roman numerals, construction, etc...

Because it was brought up earlier, I want to share with you the story of how my oldest learned to tell time. It started when he was about six years old. I noticed him asking a lot of questions regarding time. What time is it? How long until? In an hour, what time will it be? I always just gave him the answers. I never pointed to the clock, and got into a long winded explanation of how it works. I never gave him worksheets, or had him practice telling time. He asked, I answered, that was all. After a few months I noticed a shift occurred. He stopped asking questions, and instead started making statements. It's five oclock. In two hours it will be bedtime. From that point on, I knew he had acquired the skills to tell time. I bought him a watch for his next birthday, and he was thrilled to have it. The crazy thing is, my youngest picked up the skill at the same time, because he was always around listening to his brother ask questions, and make statements about time.

I don't ask my children what they want to learn. I don't try to turn every moment into a lesson. We just live our lives, and let the learning happen through everyday interactions.

usmom3
by BJ on Jul. 22, 2012 at 12:58 PM
1 mom liked this

 Well put!

Quoting my2.5boys:

I'm a little late to this conversation, but I wanted to weigh in on a few things.

We are unschoolers. For us, this means there is nothing my children have to learn. They learn only what they want to learn, or what they are interested in. I do share things with them that I find interesting, or I will bring things to their attention that I think they will enjoy, but there is no coercion or forced cooperation in our home.

We have no schedule. In fact right now my children are getting on an opposite schedule as my husband and myself. They stay up all night, and sleep most of the day. The majority of their time is spent either playing video games, or watching youtube videos of others playing video games. This has been gong on now for a couple months, and I know what many people are probably thinking, "How are they possibly learning if all they do is play games?" But because I spend so much time with my kids, I can tell you they are learning plenty. Maybe not the same things they would be learning in school, but learning none-the-less. Their vocabularies and reading skills have sky rocketed, they've learned all about geology, land formations, roman numerals, construction, etc...

Because it was brought up earlier, I want to share with you the story of how my oldest learned to tell time. It started when he was about six years old. I noticed him asking a lot of questions regarding time. What time is it? How long until? In an hour, what time will it be? I always just gave him the answers. I never pointed to the clock, and got into a long winded explanation of how it works. I never gave him worksheets, or had him practice telling time. He asked, I answered, that was all. After a few months I noticed a shift occurred. He stopped asking questions, and instead started making statements. It's five oclock. In two hours it will be bedtime. From that point on, I knew he had acquired the skills to tell time. I bought him a watch for his next birthday, and he was thrilled to have it. The crazy thing is, my youngest picked up the skill at the same time, because he was always around listening to his brother ask questions, and make statements about time.

I don't ask my children what they want to learn. I don't try to turn every moment into a lesson. We just live our lives, and let the learning happen through everyday interactions.

 

KickButtMama
by Shannon on Jul. 22, 2012 at 4:04 PM
Wow, you ask the easy question! Lol unschooling is an Umbrella term; this means it can be anything from using no structured schooling to being child led. We do child led learning. This means the kids really drive what and how we learn. You can read out our schooling http://kickbuttcrazylapbooks.blogspot.com/search?q=Defining+our+HS
KickButtMama
by Shannon on Jul. 22, 2012 at 4:08 PM
1 mom liked this
Quoting my2.5boys:

I'm a little late to this conversation, but I wanted to weigh in on a few things.

We are unschoolers. For us, this means there is nothing my children have to learn. They learn only what they want to learn, or what they are interested in. I do share things with them that I find interesting, or I will bring things to their attention that I think they will enjoy, but there is no coercion or forced cooperation in our home.

We have no schedule. In fact right now my children are getting on an opposite schedule as my husband and myself. They stay up all night, and sleep most of the day. The majority of their time is spent either playing video games, or watching youtube videos of others playing video games. This has been gong on now for a couple months, and I know what many people are probably thinking, "How are they possibly learning if all they do is play games?" But because I spend so much time with my kids, I can tell you they are learning plenty. Maybe not the same things they would be learning in school, but learning none-the-less. Their vocabularies and reading skills have sky rocketed, they've learned all about geology, land formations, roman numerals, construction, etc...

Because it was brought up earlier, I want to share with you the story of how my oldest learned to tell time. It started when he was about six years old. I noticed him asking a lot of questions regarding time. What time is it? How long until? In an hour, what time will it be? I always just gave him the answers. I never pointed to the clock, and got into a long winded explanation of how it works. I never gave him worksheets, or had him practice telling time. He asked, I answered, that was all. After a few months I noticed a shift occurred. He stopped asking questions, and instead started making statements. It's five oclock. In two hours it will be bedtime. From that point on, I knew he had acquired the skills to tell time. I bought him a watch for his next birthday, and he was thrilled to have it. The crazy thing is, my youngest picked up the skill at the same time, because he was always around listening to his brother ask questions, and make statements about time.

I don't ask my children what they want to learn. I don't try to turn every moment into a lesson. We just live our lives, and let the learning happen through everyday interactions.




Well said!! We are just slightly different. We have 'quiet time' from 10-3 7 days/week. And we have strict bedtimes. But we learn by my asking what they are interested in learning, and I find tons of resources that the kids can pick and choose from. I try to explain to others how my boys can learn from being Pokemkn addicts, but from the card games they have learned to improve their reading, math, art (as they design their own cards). Then they make up game story lines and this past year my eldest (10) even designed his own rudimentary video game! They love learning because there is no force or coercion involved.
usmom3
by BJ on Jul. 22, 2012 at 5:31 PM

 

Quoting KickButtMama:

They love learning because there is no force or coercion involved.

 Do you know how hard it is to get someone to understand that concept? My Nephew that is living with us can't wrap his head around the fact that my kids get to make decisions for themselves based off of their wants & interest & that I don't force them to do much of anything. He grew up in a house where the kids where told what to do when to do it & all comments from the kids was taken as back talk & then he also went to PS. So my house is like an alien planet to him!

buzymom93
by on Jul. 23, 2012 at 1:41 PM

here is a great site about unschooling...  www.sandradodd.com she is great and has lots of information.. you can also read anything from John Holt  

Christian Homeschooling Mamma to two wonderful, busy, boys... Mario, 19yrs, and Isaiah, 7yrs



Check out my blog:    http://ourcrazyhomeschoollife.blogspot.com/

buzymom93
by on Jul. 23, 2012 at 1:44 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting my2.5boys:

I'm a little late to this conversation, but I wanted to weigh in on a few things.

We are unschoolers. For us, this means there is nothing my children have to learn. They learn only what they want to learn, or what they are interested in. I do share things with them that I find interesting, or I will bring things to their attention that I think they will enjoy, but there is no coercion or forced cooperation in our home.

We have no schedule. In fact right now my children are getting on an opposite schedule as my husband and myself. They stay up all night, and sleep most of the day. The majority of their time is spent either playing video games, or watching youtube videos of others playing video games. This has been gong on now for a couple months, and I know what many people are probably thinking, "How are they possibly learning if all they do is play games?" But because I spend so much time with my kids, I can tell you they are learning plenty. Maybe not the same things they would be learning in school, but learning none-the-less. Their vocabularies and reading skills have sky rocketed, they've learned all about geology, land formations, roman numerals, construction, etc...

Because it was brought up earlier, I want to share with you the story of how my oldest learned to tell time. It started when he was about six years old. I noticed him asking a lot of questions regarding time. What time is it? How long until? In an hour, what time will it be? I always just gave him the answers. I never pointed to the clock, and got into a long winded explanation of how it works. I never gave him worksheets, or had him practice telling time. He asked, I answered, that was all. After a few months I noticed a shift occurred. He stopped asking questions, and instead started making statements. It's five oclock. In two hours it will be bedtime. From that point on, I knew he had acquired the skills to tell time. I bought him a watch for his next birthday, and he was thrilled to have it. The crazy thing is, my youngest picked up the skill at the same time, because he was always around listening to his brother ask questions, and make statements about time.

I don't ask my children what they want to learn. I don't try to turn every moment into a lesson. We just live our lives, and let the learning happen through everyday interactions.

I love this and this is where i am at with my 7yr old.. he is learning at his own pace what he wants to learn... he plays on the computer plays his wii and plays outside all the time.. but he is learning..

Christian Homeschooling Mamma to two wonderful, busy, boys... Mario, 19yrs, and Isaiah, 7yrs



Check out my blog:    http://ourcrazyhomeschoollife.blogspot.com/

4quivers
by on Jul. 23, 2012 at 7:29 PM

Funny you should mention long division.  My Husband just informed me that he really wishes he had learned long division.  IN his school they used calculators all the time so he never mastered the skill.  We have a need in the family, so we start long division in 3rd and 4th grade this very soon.  As I said before, all nuts are different.  I do have them write, spell, and do some math here and there.  But I take close observation for opportunities to arise.  There will be things that you will take as a battle.  One of my boys does not like to read.  He does not read at his level at all, even though his brother can read lower High School level in 3rd grade.   But. . . .  Since I have never fought him on the subject he is often caught sitting and trying to figure out the words.  At that moment, you've caught him in an interest, and you'd better listen,cuz if you don't, you'll miss the lesson yourself! 

4quivers, can I ask you some questions? How do you make sure that they learn everything that they need to learn? For example, my daughter hated learning to tell time. Had it been up to her, she would have never learned it. My oldest would never  math if I left it up to him, and my youngest two would only do math. I'm a firm believer in following their interests (my youngest loves poetry, for example), but what do you do to make sure that they all learn long division, for example?


lil_mama06
by Debbie on Jul. 23, 2012 at 8:11 PM

I've been curious to know about unschooling myself..THANK YOU for all the links and information... 

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