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Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

First day of homeschooling was today...

Posted by on Aug. 1, 2012 at 7:22 PM
  • 5 Replies

Our first day of homeschooling was today. My oldest is in first grade and my middle child is doing pre-k/kindergarten. I feel very positive about the experience. I worked one on one with each child. We did 30 minutes work/play switch. So with my first grader we got through unit 1 of phonics/reading, unit one of science, and we did a journal entry. We also read two of his books, and a few extra science books. We did the workbook parts of the phonics system. We are using Hooked On Phonics.

I was hoping to get to Herritage Studies, Math, and Grammar today. However because I did so much with the other subjects; well just do the missed subjects tomorrow and more worksheets over the stuff we did today. 

My Pre-K/K student got through unit 1 of his Phonics, some writing of numbers and letters, and reading a couple of times his book for the phonics. He also did his journal. I need to print out the Letter of the Week lesson plans and get to some other things with him. However, for the first day of doing this- I think we did well and got through a lot.

The method of working with one kid for a half hour while allowing the other to play was very helpful. I was able to have complete one on one time with that kid and it gave the other a small break. So I think I might keep this method up as well.

Do you guys think I covered enough materials? Each kid did about an hour or two of actual work time. I hope this was enough. 

Oh and we are doing a sticker chart as well for their good behavior. 

Any advice? 

by on Aug. 1, 2012 at 7:22 PM
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Replies (1-5):
bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Aug. 1, 2012 at 7:25 PM

 Sounds great! 

balancedmama
by on Aug. 1, 2012 at 8:09 PM

Your kids are pretty young so you're probably good for now as a start, but in SOME states once you get further into 1st grade each kid is expected to do 3 hours of work/day.  Don't let that discourage you though.  You have some time to work up to it.

With kids as young as yours it is REALLY hard to have them work independently so you are on the right track handling things the way you are, keep up the good work.  As you get more confident and the kids get more capable you might start "multi-tasking" in two ways I can think of in particular:

1. Make their "play time" count as learning time too.  Find and/or make some educational toys (montessori inspired, geoboards, Mellisa and Doug has some great stuff, geographic puzzles, etc) and have their play time be an extension of a lesson because the toy relates to the lesson you just did together (or introduces something right before you do the related lesson).  There are also ebsites with practice games online.  You can also do an art lesson and then let the one paint, sculpt or sketch (with a clear goal like "now the face you made needs all its parts - don't forget ears!") while you move on to the other one for the next "lesson with the other child.  You can also do this with science.  For example, talk about sinking and floating and then let your child "experiement" with a variety of items to test whether each thing sinks or floats for 20 minutes while you work with the other son.  Give him a table that has a pic of each item and he checks off either the sink or float column.  You get the idea.

2.  Do some lessons together.  They can both learn about the same TIME in history, but then have different expecations in terms of what they DO related to what they just learned for your assessment of what they have retained.  Same goes for science.  You can introduce both kids to the same concept, do the same experiement and then do "extensions" for the older child.  Running "Unit Studies" can happen as a family this way and cover Lots of subject areas all at once.

As a bonus: there are certain chores around the house that can also double as lessons. 

For example: For your youngest, helping match up the socks when you are doing laundry and helping you sort clothes counts as practice with matching and sorting skills.  For your oldest, you can teach about symmetry as you are folding clothes and he has to find the line of symmetry to figure out what to run his fold lines parrallel to.

coala
by Silver Member on Aug. 1, 2012 at 8:12 PM

It sounds like you had a pretty productive day.  I hope all of mine are that productive.  I do like the idea of the focused attention, but you could probably do a unit study with the phonics.  Your younger one will catch on to what the older one is doing.  Just a suggestion.

chotovec82
by Bronze Member on Aug. 1, 2012 at 8:20 PM

No I don't think so. The Hooked on Phonics system is pretty different by age group. My youngest is doing actual phonics; the other boy is doing actual putting words together/reading. So I know my 4 yr old won't catch up to that. 


Quoting coala:

It sounds like you had a pretty productive day.  I hope all of mine are that productive.  I do like the idea of the focused attention, but you could probably do a unit study with the phonics.  Your younger one will catch on to what the older one is doing.  Just a suggestion.


chotovec82
by Bronze Member on Aug. 1, 2012 at 8:22 PM

Fortunately I am in a state and will be going to a state that doesn't keep track of hours of actual study. I am in Indaina and they may keep track of attendence and that's it. 

The other stuff is a possibility eventually. I am going to to it this way for a while until I get the hang of it. I actually like how things went today. I might start doing a block scheduling type thing with it. 

Quoting balancedmama:

Your kids are pretty young so you're probably good for now as a start, but in SOME states once you get further into 1st grade each kid is expected to do 3 hours of work/day.  Don't let that discourage you though.  You have some time to work up to it.

With kids as young as yours it is REALLY hard to have them work independently so you are on the right track handling things the way you are, keep up the good work.  As you get more confident and the kids get more capable you might start "multi-tasking" in two ways I can think of in particular:

1. Make their "play time" count as learning time too.  Find and/or make some educational toys (montessori inspired, geoboards, Mellisa and Doug has some great stuff, geographic puzzles, etc) and have their play time be an extension of a lesson because the toy relates to the lesson you just did together (or introduces something right before you do the related lesson).  There are also ebsites with practice games online.  You can also do an art lesson and then let the one paint, sculpt or sketch (with a clear goal like "now the face you made needs all its parts - don't forget ears!") while you move on to the other one for the next "lesson with the other child.  You can also do this with science.  For example, talk about sinking and floating and then let your child "experiement" with a variety of items to test whether each thing sinks or floats for 20 minutes while you work with the other son.  Give him a table that has a pic of each item and he checks off either the sink or float column.  You get the idea.

2.  Do some lessons together.  They can both learn about the same TIME in history, but then have different expecations in terms of what they DO related to what they just learned for your assessment of what they have retained.  Same goes for science.  You can introduce both kids to the same concept, do the same experiement and then do "extensions" for the older child.  Running "Unit Studies" can happen as a family this way and cover Lots of subject areas all at once.

As a bonus: there are certain chores around the house that can also double as lessons. 

For example: For your youngest, helping match up the socks when you are doing laundry and helping you sort clothes counts as practice with matching and sorting skills.  For your oldest, you can teach about symmetry as you are folding clothes and he has to find the line of symmetry to figure out what to run his fold lines parrallel to.


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