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How would you go about this? K12 ---> unschooling

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I just started K12 on 8/16 for my 8 & 11 yr olds. I immediately realized my mistake by week one. My 11 yr old struggled horribly in public school (has an IEP) and here I go, dumping him right back into a public school program. So, I sent word to K12 yesterday that he is done with their program. I need him to enjoy learning and enjoy being stress-free when it comes to learning.

What would be the best transition? Now, I ask that because while I fully intend to allow him to guide us on this journey, I also intend to present some math curriculum. I feel that math & writing are extremely important and I want him to know his basics at least. He still does not know multiplication, division, fractions, etc and I know he will need those basic things for the real world.





by on Sep. 1, 2012 at 12:48 PM
Replies (11-18):
kirbymom
by Sonja on Sep. 2, 2012 at 3:58 PM
1 mom liked this

It sounds like his confidence in his abilities needs a boost. How about doing somethings that are slightly easy and then putting in a problem that is somewhat difficult to do along with his other work.  That way he is gaining confidence by doing the work he knows he can do and learning to gain more confidence by working on some of the more difficult problems one at a time in his schoolwork.  I am just wondering here, does he have a little difficulty in reading?  I did when I was young and had the same issues. Maybe he's in the same boat? ?  

  

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Tesserae
by on Sep. 2, 2012 at 4:18 PM

You are 100% correct. His confidence is shot. I have been letting him play basic addition games and he's proud of himself when he gets everything right so quickly. And yes, he has reading issues. He is not a strong reader and his comprehension is very lacking. He has visual & auditory processing disorder. All the information needs to be given to him in creative way. And nothing really sticks unless he is super interested in it.

But I absolutely agree, I need to go back to basics with Noah and build his confidence.

Quoting kirbymom:

It sounds like his confidence in his abilities needs a boost. How about doing somethings that are slightly easy and then putting in a problem that is somewhat difficult to do along with his other work.  That way he is gaining confidence by doing the work he knows he can do and learning to gain more confidence by working on some of the more difficult problems one at a time in his schoolwork.  I am just wondering here, does he have a little difficulty in reading?  I did when I was young and had the same issues. Maybe he's in the same boat? ?  





kirbymom
by Sonja on Sep. 2, 2012 at 5:21 PM
1 mom liked this

 I thought so. Basically, my comprehension was tied directly into my confidence, none of which I had. So, my mother sat down with me one evening after she got home from work and read a story to me. After a few sentences, she would stop and ask me to describe to her, in as much detail as possible, what I remember her reading. After awhile I was able to remember the few sentences much better. So much so that my mom lengthened the amount of sentences until eventually, I was the one who was doing the reading to her!  AND I was retaining almost everything that I heard and read! My whole life was turned around because of this. And you know what she read to me?  She read a readers digest book.  Before this happened, I absolutely HATED reading and hated anything to do with school.  After this, I absolutely LOVED reading and decided that school wasn't so bad anymore.  lol  :)   Maybe this same approach might help you and your son?

Quoting Tesserae:

You are 100% correct. His confidence is shot. I have been letting him play basic addition games and he's proud of himself when he gets everything right so quickly. And yes, he has reading issues. He is not a strong reader and his comprehension is very lacking. He has visual & auditory processing disorder. All the information needs to be given to him in creative way. And nothing really sticks unless he is super interested in it.

But I absolutely agree, I need to go back to basics with Noah and build his confidence.

Quoting kirbymom:

It sounds like his confidence in his abilities needs a boost. How about doing somethings that are slightly easy and then putting in a problem that is somewhat difficult to do along with his other work.  That way he is gaining confidence by doing the work he knows he can do and learning to gain more confidence by working on some of the more difficult problems one at a time in his schoolwork.  I am just wondering here, does he have a little difficulty in reading?  I did when I was young and had the same issues. Maybe he's in the same boat? ?  



  

undefined

taylamill
by on Sep. 2, 2012 at 5:25 PM
We are members of time4learning.com. It's a great site. Only twenty bucks a month and it's almost like playing games. We love it and dd is getting better at her harder subjects every day.
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Tesserae
by on Sep. 2, 2012 at 5:28 PM

I really want him to develop a love of reading and be able to write well and I think your suggestion is absolutely the way to go. And as we said, I will make it all very simple in the beginning. I basically need to go back to basics with almost everything since public school did an amazing job of making him feel like a failure and not making sure he had the foundation he needed. I swear, I think they just passed him to pass him. The only grade he was help back was kindergarten. I should have started home schooling years ago, I feel so guilty.

Quoting Tesserae:

I just started K12 on 8/16 for my 8 & 11 yr olds. I immediately realized my mistake by week one. My 11 yr old struggled horribly in public school (has an IEP) and here I go, dumping him right back into a public school program. So, I sent word to K12 yesterday that he is done with their program. I need him to enjoy learning and enjoy being stress-free when it comes to learning.

What would be the best transition? Now, I ask that because while I fully intend to allow him to guide us on this journey, I also intend to present some math curriculum. I feel that math & writing are extremely important and I want him to know his basics at least. He still does not know multiplication, division, fractions, etc and I know he will need those basic things for the real world.






Tesserae
by on Sep. 2, 2012 at 5:29 PM

thanks =) I'll check it out.

Quoting taylamill:

We are members of time4learning.com. It's a great site. Only twenty bucks a month and it's almost like playing games. We love it and dd is getting better at her harder subjects every day.





KLove_Mom
by on Sep. 3, 2012 at 5:23 PM
1 mom liked this

Along with cooking... don't forget to double a recipe, and then take the extra t a neighbor to teach abtu service...

I was also thinking that building with blocks or legos can be math. Geometry for sure with shapes and angles, and measuring with a ruler. You can multiply how tall by how wide and find the area of the wall. That kind of thing.

When I was behind in math skills in 7th grade my mom used Dominoes to quiz me, and we'd play games with them too.

I think oral book reports are a great stepping stone into written ones. When he gets used to answering your questions about a book, then he'll know exactly what he should write about the next time.
He could pick any book from the library he wants. Maybe alternate fiction one week and non-fiction the next, and then maybe you get to pick the next one as something to challenge him, and then back to him picking. 
I've been amazed how my kids love the books from the non-fiction section in the kids area just as much as the storybooks. 

Tesserae
by on Sep. 3, 2012 at 7:34 PM

I think these are great ideas, thank you.  I absolutely love the lego counting suggestion! He loves legos and I can see how we can incorporate them into math a lot.

Quoting KLove_Mom:

Along with cooking... don't forget to double a recipe, and then take the extra t a neighbor to teach abtu service...

I was also thinking that building with blocks or legos can be math. Geometry for sure with shapes and angles, and measuring with a ruler. You can multiply how tall by how wide and find the area of the wall. That kind of thing.

When I was behind in math skills in 7th grade my mom used Dominoes to quiz me, and we'd play games with them too.

I think oral book reports are a great stepping stone into written ones. When he gets used to answering your questions about a book, then he'll know exactly what he should write about the next time.
He could pick any book from the library he wants. Maybe alternate fiction one week and non-fiction the next, and then maybe you get to pick the next one as something to challenge him, and then back to him picking. 
I've been amazed how my kids love the books from the non-fiction section in the kids area just as much as the storybooks. 





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