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Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

Homeschooling reality fact or fiction

To what extent are you worried that your children will get an unfair view on reality based on the home schooling experience.

1 example is: In reality you're not going to have somebody 1 on 1 explain to you what your doing wrong at a job site.

2nd example Most home schooling people that I know of don't give out grades pass or fail or any other type of grade but in real life you can fail at things and there is no do over
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
by on Sep. 12, 2012 at 1:57 PM
Replies (21-29):
bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Sep. 13, 2012 at 2:10 PM

 WOW!  Sorry, I didn't realize how long that had gotten!

Knightquester
by Bronze Member on Sep. 13, 2012 at 2:19 PM
1 mom liked this

I don't worry about things like that.  I don't give my children a free pass on anything, and I don't fluff things up and make their life anymore easier because they're homeschoolers.  The reality is if done right a homeschooler will not be any less down to earth and capable of coping with reality when they head out there into that big world on their own than a public or even private schooler.  I know this for a fact because my brothers and I didn't have issues when we graduated from homeschooling and went off to college and work.

Here's the thing there are people in the world that were public or even private schooled that lack commonsense and the ability to cope with reality, there's no excuse except poor parenting and the same can be said with the homeschoolers that are this way too... poor parenting.  I let my children know I won't be the best parent in the world and will make my fair share of mistakes, but I'll do my best to ensure they grow up strong, intelligent and responsible adults, that's all any parent can do.

LoriAlane8
by Member on Sep. 21, 2012 at 11:22 AM
1 mom liked this

1. In reality you are not 5, 6, 10 or 12 years old when you get a job. Homeschooling should be about helping your child grow to be an independent learner.

2. I told my children plenty of times they were failing or not doing their best. If a homeschool parent isn't being honest with their children about how they are doing, helping them with their weaknesses and how to overcome those and pointing out their strengths, then they are not doing their job. Its the schools these days that many times want to give out ribbons to everyone!

awilliams77
by on Sep. 23, 2012 at 2:38 AM
Quoting oredeb:

 hmmm, not worried at all,  well ive already proved homeschool works, my kids all have  good jobs and most are married!!!


their bosses love them, i think its because of what and how they were taught, to take time with people, answer questions, care about people, to be an owner, care about their work, and they dont give up because somethings hard




This! We have 3 hs grads and a 7th grader left. Oldest is an assistant mgr at a Chik Fil-a, and in her 3rd year of a psych major at USC. She lives on her own. Next is a newly certified and employed massage therapist, at age 19. 17 yr old is a part time nanny for two families and saving up for cosmetology school, something she's wanted to do since she was 12.

I think I am figuring out that I am really an unschooler at heart. Tried for years to make curriculums work...
awilliams77
by on Sep. 23, 2012 at 2:43 AM
So you are a second generation homeschooler too!
KrissyKC
by Silver Member on Sep. 23, 2012 at 2:52 PM

Actually, until you learn your job... in most cases, you can have your boss or trainer help you get it right on the job.  

Plus, it has to do with how you teach independence and personal responsibility at home. 

I recently read a book about that, and it put the responibility for stuff on the shoulders of the kids.   One example they gave was regarding public schooled kids.   They said to give them their lunch money and allowance on a set day, say Saturday.   Tell them how much they will need for lunch.   If they spend too much on other stuff, they go hungry or do extra chores (outside of their regular chores) for lunch money.

Also, it said that if they refuse to do their chores, still give a regular allowance.   Instead of taking away allowance, the child should have to "hire" their parent or sibling for doing the work for them.   Just like if you don't feel like mowing the lawn, you hire a neighbor boy or something and have to pay them.  

If you have this mentality, then you can see how it starts to rollover and blend into your child's homeschooling life.   Your child can still be raised up expecting to be held responsible for stuff, even if you don't give out normal grades.



JKronrod
by Bronze Member on Sep. 23, 2012 at 2:54 PM

I agree with most of the other responses.  Although I only home schooled our oldest through ninth grade, he did fine when he went to a "regular" school, and he is now a junior in college (University of California, Merced).  He's never had problems getting -- and holding -- a job.  He's been working full time summers and part time during the school year as a bike mechanic (two different shops). In both cases the employers have been happy to have him back.  So clearly, for him, at least, there has been no problem with "transitioning" to the "real world" -- either in school or employment.  As with most things, it really depends on the individual and their family, but there is no evidence that as a group home schooled students do any worse than "regular" schooled students once they stop "formal" schooling, and there are some studies that suggest that they do better.   

Bethsunshine
by on Sep. 23, 2012 at 2:59 PM


Quoting Savedfromsin79:

To what extent are you worried that your children will get an unfair view on reality based on the home schooling experience.

1 example is: In reality you're not going to have somebody 1 on 1 explain to you what your doing wrong at a job site. Actually, this couldn't be further from the truth.. When you mess up at work, you're not automatically going to get fired for not performing a task the right way. Your supervisor or co-worker is going to point it out and show you the correct way.Otherwise, how will you ever learn the RIGHT way to do it?

2nd example Most home schooling people that I know of don't give out grades pass or fail or any other type of grade but in real life you can fail at things and there is no do over There are no "grades" or passing and failing in real life either so  how is a school grading system like real life? I've never gotten a passing or failing grade at any job I've ever had.



Join us in Christian Homeschoolers!!


http://www.cafemom.com/group/3200

Bethsunshine
by on Sep. 23, 2012 at 3:15 PM

Another thing to think about: One of the main things we are trying to teach our kids through homeschooling is RESPONSIBILITY!! We just had this discussion with them the other day, because they haven't been very responsible and it's driving me up the wall. Each of them has a plastic storage bin in which to keep their books, worksheets, folders, and supplies. They have folders for math and grammar to put their worksheets in and they haven't been putting their things where they belong which takes up MY time when I'm trying to check their work. They also have a checklist with their assignments as well as their other responsibilities on it ( practicing instruments, exercise, etc.)

I'll finish this reply later. We're getting ready to leave now!


Join us in Christian Homeschoolers!!


http://www.cafemom.com/group/3200

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