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For those of you with kids who have ADHD

Posted by on Sep. 18, 2012 at 4:46 PM
  • 9 Replies

I have been doing alot of research on ADHD lately because I seriously wonder if my daughter has it.  She is very impulsive.  It is like she has no control over her behavior at times.  One minute she will be laughing and the sweetest little girl and 10 minutes later it is like she is completely a different person.  She will yell, hit (or act like she is going to hit), etc.  It can be something very small that changes her attitude.  Then, 10-30 minutes later, she is back to that sweet little girl.

She is also very very hyper.  If anyone comes over to our house she gets so wild.  I can't let people play with her alot because she will get out of control with it.  She will get so wild that we can barely calm her back down.

She is super smart.  She catches onto things very quickly.  She has already learned her Fact Families 0-2 in three days (well really two, the one day was a review since she had been sick for a week and we didn't do any schooling).  She is already grasping the concept of long vowels after less than a week of working on them.

When I discipline her she just doesn't seem to care.  I can tell her that if she does something again I am going to send her to her room or give her a spanking or another punishment.  She will just look at me and say "I don't care".  I have really been feeling down lately.  I just feel like such a failure as a mother.  My husband does not understand.  She is doing great schoolwise, but it is during free time that she acts up.  We started our stations today and she had a meltdown.  I know that many people say that change is someting that really upsets some kids with ADHD.

I have read up on ADHD and she has so many of the symptoms.  Can some of you please explain the symptoms that your children have.  How do you go about having her tested?  My husband is denying that there is something wrong, but I also have older boys (age 14) and they never acted like this.  At times I just think it is something I'm doing wrong, but at other times I feel like this is not normal behavior. 

Thank you so much.

by on Sep. 18, 2012 at 4:46 PM
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Replies (1-9):
WantedNameTaken
by Member on Sep. 18, 2012 at 5:11 PM

How old is she?  We have two who were diagnosed ADHD, but their pediatrician doesn't evaluate for it until kids are 7-8 years old, because symptoms that appear to be related to ADHD often resolve themselves with maturity.

I knew that there was "something" with one of my kids, but had no clue that it was ADHD.  I wasn't seeking a diagnosis, but during an annual checkup, I completed a behavioral checklist that their doctor's office gives to parents of kids in 2nd-3rd grade.  He knew right away that there was a concern.  His suspected diagnosis was confirmed by a psychiatrist at our local Children's hospital though.  That's when I began my research in earnest and only when I was satisfied did I agree to follow the courses of treatment that were recommended.  Two years later, when our youngest started exhibiting the same behaviors, we had an idea of that with which we were dealing.  

The textbook definitions for ADHD could have been written by someone who observed my ADHD kids.  They are the poster children of it for sure!  LOL! :)

My other two kids have no such issues.

romacox
by Silver Member on Sep. 18, 2012 at 5:11 PM
2 moms liked this

Mothers have a natural instinct with their children. Trust that, but be aware there are many things that can  cause or mimic ADHD  including food allergies. Red food coloring is a common one, wheat is another.    One of my grandsons was like you describe only if he ate something with sugar in it .  His daddy had the same symptoms when he ate sugar.   Nothing wrong with having her tested, but be aware that doctors often treat symptoms rather than causes...all medications have side effects, especially because the cause remains untreated. 

Sugar Can Ferment In The Digestive Track

Symptoms Of ADHD

Conditions That Cause Or Mimic ADHD

Testing For ADHD

SusanTheWriter
by Bronze Member on Sep. 18, 2012 at 5:27 PM
2 moms liked this

ADD/ADHD is a diagnosis that should only be given by your pediatrician or child psychologist after a lengthy analysis of behaviour, usually from more than one person. There are also several different types of ADD, not all of which include hyperactivity, but the big things you want to focus on are whether or not the behaviour is out of the child's control after introducing behaviour modification techniques, and whether it's impacting their ability to function.

There's a world of difference between a child who's just very bouncy and active and one who deals with ADD.

If and when you get a diagnosis, see if there are non-medical modifications you can make before taking the leap to a prescription. Diet, behaviour, alternative therapies may be a better bet for your child than medication. That said, the right medication in the right dosage can make a huge difference in your child's life.

We knew something was off with DD for a long time before we got a preliminary diagnosis when she was 6. She wasn't hyper, but impulsive, inattentive, inability to control herself with others. She was beyond quirky and into "something is off" territory. We did everything we could - diet, behaviour mods, lists, charts, reminders - everything. But in 5th grade, things started to go totally off the rails and something had to change. The medicine was a lifesaver. We've had to adjust a couple of times since then, but there have been no visible side effects and it really does work.

Girls with ADD tend to be more prone to adolescent depression and self-destructive behaviour - I know this from personal experience - so understanding what you're dealing with now may have a wonderfully positive influence on her as she grows. Good luck!

kirbymom
by Sonja on Sep. 18, 2012 at 5:58 PM
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You could be just going through a phase. I know that that seems to.... do away with your concerns but it really could be as simple as that. Now, assuming that that isn't the case, you should look into the sugar thing as pp have suggested. I know that this next thing I am about to suggest sounds crazy but it truly works.  You should take one routine that you have and try doing it different. Like for instance, if you get up at 6 am, try getting up at 6:15. If you have no special time of playing some music that is sweet on the ears and the soul, you should play some for about an hour. Now the reason I suggest these things is because our bodies are very sensitive to what is going on around us and react to that without us even being aware of it.  Even the smallest little nuances we react to. That is how we can have such mood swings.  If you can become aware of this, then you can take steps to learn how to counter balance this when it arises.  It isn't easy at first but the more you become aware of your own surroundings then you can become adept at fixing them too.  Finding out what is the cause and treating it. No matter what it is.

 And just so you know, I am ADD, my husband is ADHD and our 7 kids take after either one of us. I know this because my husband was a trained medic in the miliatry like any general practitioner and he had to know these things and to be able to treat and handle them all the time.  One thing about either ADD or ADHD is you have to first understand how they work on the brain. Once you have an understanding, even a little understanding will go a long way in knowing what to do to help someone deal with these issues.  Also, it helps to look at them more positively than negatively. What most people don't realize about these 2 issues, are the facts that it is how the brain is wired and how the brain perceives things. So for instance, a person who has ADD, has a short attention span and can be easily diverted from subject to subject or thought to thought. (ME)   Now, when you know this, you can learn how to work with ADD and can tailor schooling to this and behaviour discipline.  You can tailor a job around this. This works for children and adults alike.  Remember, I have 7 children that is either one or the other.  If you have someone who is ADHD, someone who can not sit still and has to sit in every position they can, who is project oriented but mostly doesn't finish them all the way, is hands on, is just like ADD but you have to add being very very hyper to it. And I have a few of those.  :)  You have 2 choices. You can get drugs and work with this that way, or you can learn to do this with help from everyone who is willing to help.  I chose the latter myself.  And I have learned to adapt and use their particularness to their own advantage.  It isn't easy, but, it can be done.  I've done it.  

starbeck96
by Bronze Member on Sep. 18, 2012 at 6:12 PM
1 mom liked this

I am not looking into it for medicine really, just so I will know so I know how to address certain situations.

We have really been watching her sugar intake and it has not had any different effect on her.  We also try to stay away from things with red food coloring because we did find that it caused the kids to be hyper.

Quoting romacox:

Mothers have a natural instinct with their children. Trust that, but be aware there are many things that can  cause or mimic ADHD  including food allergies. Red food coloring is a common one, wheat is another.    One of my grandsons was like you describe only if he ate something with sugar in it .  His daddy had the same symptoms when he ate sugar.   Nothing wrong with having her tested, but be aware that doctors often treat symptoms rather than causes...all medications have side effects, especially because the cause remains untreated. 

Sugar Can Ferment In The Digestive Track

Symptoms Of ADHD

Conditions That Cause Or Mimic ADHD

Testing For ADHD


romacox
by Silver Member on Sep. 19, 2012 at 6:44 AM
1 mom liked this

It sounds like you are on the right track. It can be very frustrating when we know our children need something, but not sure what it is.  You are closer to her than anyone, and are gifted with a mothers instinct...So you will be the to find the answer before anyone else.  Keep us posted, as we all learn from each other

Quoting starbeck96:

I am not looking into it for medicine really, just so I will know so I know how to address certain situations.

We have really been watching her sugar intake and it has not had any different effect on her.  We also try to stay away from things with red food coloring because we did find that it caused the kids to be hyper.

Quoting romacox:

Mothers have a natural instinct with their children. Trust that, but be aware there are many things that can  cause or mimic ADHD  including food allergies. Red food coloring is a common one, wheat is another.    One of my grandsons was like you describe only if he ate something with sugar in it .  His daddy had the same symptoms when he ate sugar.   Nothing wrong with having her tested, but be aware that doctors often treat symptoms rather than causes...all medications have side effects, especially because the cause remains untreated. 

Sugar Can Ferment In The Digestive Track

Symptoms Of ADHD

Conditions That Cause Or Mimic ADHD

Testing For ADHD



starbeck96
by Bronze Member on Sep. 19, 2012 at 10:19 AM
2 moms liked this

Sorry I've not replied back yet, but my internet was out for alot of the day yesterday.  Thank you for all your comments.

My daughter will be 6 next month.  This is not something new.  She has been acting like this for a while, but I really just chalked it up to a stage she was going through.  But instead of it getting better, it has been getting worse.

I also know that this is not just a bubbly behavior or just her being a little hyper.  I also have 14 year old twin boys.  They were hyper when they were younger and really  they still are hyper for their age.  They were nothing compared to her.  They always obeyed pretty well.  My daughter has no cares about consequences.  The boys did.  She is just total opposite of them as far as her behavior. 

I really just want us to have a day without a meltdown (which happened 4 times yesterday).  She does really well while doing her work and while we are in "school mode".  But it is those in between times that she has her melt downs.  I am going to approach it differently today.  We use stations for her while I help her brothers.  I usually pick out what each station is.  Today, I am going to let her choose.  We will see if that helps.  I am also working on getting a stricter schedule.  I am going to see if this will help..

mrs.musquiz
by on Sep. 19, 2012 at 11:20 AM
3 moms liked this

I am sure that my son has "something" with him. I assumed it was ADHD, or Defiance Disorder. This last grocery trip, I didn't buy ANY processed, convenient snacks. I used to buy fruit snacks, pop tarts, cookies, chips, fruity cereal...etc. These are also some of my husband's fav. snacks. Instead I only bought apples,oranges, bananas, carrots, celery, yogurt, nuts, cheese sticks and applesauce. For cereal I didn't buy anything with food dyes. This has not only made a big difference in my son's hyperactivity and meltdowns (he's 5 by the way), but it also has helped with mindless snacking all day long. He still has some small tantrums if he doesn't get what he wants, but that is a learned behavior that he will have to "un-learn".  We will also have to work on a better sleep schedule. He stays up way too late for a 5 year old. I know that if I can get him on a better schedule it will help tremendously. Good luck, I'm right there with ya!

SusanTheWriter
by Bronze Member on Sep. 19, 2012 at 11:34 AM
1 mom liked this

There are a couple of diets that target ADHD symptoms. WebMD outlines the basics of one diet. There is also the Feingold Diet, which restricts all food chemicals, preservatives and coloring.

We cleaned up our diet several years ago for our entire family's health. It's not 100% clean, but we do all right. It had very little effect on our daughter, but that merely indicates that her ADD isn't linked to diet, but is a neurophysical/neurochemical issue.

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