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Maybe someone can help me. (PIOG)

Posted by on Oct. 4, 2012 at 1:29 PM
  • 9 Replies

My daughter is 11.  She is horrible with handwriting, she is very literal, and has problems with abstract thought.  If I say something that is contradictory to what she knows, or the directions she is given in the book, she says she is confused and doesn't understand.  Writing and math are really bad.  She understands grammar, but not how to use it.  She understands addition, subtraction, multiplication, rounding, decimals, and fractions, but combining them and adding variables, really confuses her.  I know she has mild dyslexia, I have it worse than she does.  I'm trying to figure out if she might have something more and possible ways to help.  This came to light while my husband and her were arguing and he said why do you take things so literal and cannot multitask.  It got me wondering and now I'm asking and looking for information.

by on Oct. 4, 2012 at 1:29 PM
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Replies (1-9):
downsouthjunkin
by on Oct. 4, 2012 at 2:53 PM

 My DD sounds kind of like yours. A lot of times I have to explain things to her (that most kids get very readily) and she has problems with abstract thought/visualizing math concepts in her head. We are pretty sure that she has a combo of Aspergers/ADD/ADHD with some sensory and anxiety issues thrown in. She is undiagnosed though. Does your DD have problems with making friends? I'm now in the process of trying to locate other children in the area that are on the spectrum. I've come to the conclusion that the chance of her making friends with kids that are not on the spectrum is very slim.

kirbymom
by Sonja on Oct. 4, 2012 at 3:13 PM
1 mom liked this

I think she just may need some time to make the connection from what she is absolute sure of,  to the direct changing of what she is absolute sure of.  Sometimes its the time and the repetition of, that makes that connection.  One of my sons is the same way. If its 2:43, we say its close enough to say its a quarter til 3 but he will say it's NOT a quarter til 3 that its 2:43. Drives me nuts, I tell you. :)  

Silverkitty
by Bronze Member on Oct. 4, 2012 at 5:48 PM

My daughter does that.  It really does drive us bonkers. 

As for friends, she does well with people, but no one wants to spend time with her away from what ever activity they know her through.  So she doesn't have friends in the sense I consider friends, people who do things with others all the time.  She does have friends in the sense of people who will play with her, which is what she considers friends.

On a different note - Today I typed up a time table for doing school and for not doing school.  It was the easiest day of school we have had since we started, in 6 years.

Quoting kirbymom:

I think she just may need some time to make the connection from what she is absolute sure of,  to the direct changing of what she is absolute sure of.  Sometimes its the time and the repetition of, that makes that connection.  One of my sons is the same way. If its 2:43, we say its close enough to say its a quarter til 3 but he will say it's NOT a quarter til 3 that its 2:43. Drives me nuts, I tell you. :)  


kirbymom
by Sonja on Oct. 4, 2012 at 6:01 PM

That was a very great move! If she see's it and it's precise. She can move mountains. That is how my kids are. That is how I like things to be too, but with me, I also have a very cluttered  mind and that leaks out into my everyday life. lol  I am so glad that you found something that works! That is such a relief for you guys, I'm sure. :)  

Quoting Silverkitty:

My daughter does that.  It really does drive us bonkers. 

As for friends, she does well with people, but no one wants to spend time with her away from what ever activity they know her through.  So she doesn't have friends in the sense I consider friends, people who do things with others all the time.  She does have friends in the sense of people who will play with her, which is what she considers friends.

On a different note - Today I typed up a time table for doing school and for not doing school.  It was the easiest day of school we have had since we started, in 6 years.

Quoting kirbymom:

I think she just may need some time to make the connection from what she is absolute sure of,  to the direct changing of what she is absolute sure of.  Sometimes its the time and the repetition of, that makes that connection.  One of my sons is the same way. If its 2:43, we say its close enough to say its a quarter til 3 but he will say it's NOT a quarter til 3 that its 2:43. Drives me nuts, I tell you. :)  



  

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oredeb
by debbie on Oct. 5, 2012 at 12:06 PM

BUMP!

KrissyKC
by Silver Member on Oct. 5, 2012 at 12:17 PM

My almost 11 year old is the same way.   She has to ask permission for EVERYTHING... we have a quiet joke between hubby and I that she even has to ask permission before she sneezes.

She's EXTREMELY literal, and has had other issues, too.   However, her mathmatic ability can be off the charts as long as it's not super tedious.   She understands the concepts, but hates doing the long work involved.

She also needs me to CONSTANTLY be involved.  I cannot just hand her a worksheet and say go at it because she acts like she just can't...  She picks at whatever she can (picking her lips, fingers, a string on her clothes) or she will stare at the lines on the wall, etc.

She can understand some of my other directions, but she constantly has to correct me or at least clarify that it says something else.  It's like she HAS to follow the rule...


kittyfaery
by on Oct. 5, 2012 at 12:31 PM
My 9 year old son is very literal like that too. He does that too with the time. And he is very black and white with things. He is great at math except for problems that he has to figure out how to solve. And writing has been really frustrating. I always feel like he doesn't want to think for himself.


Quoting Silverkitty:

My daughter does that.  It really does drive us bonkers. 

As for friends, she does well with people, but no one wants to spend time with her away from what ever activity they know her through.  So she doesn't have friends in the sense I consider friends, people who do things with others all the time.  She does have friends in the sense of people who will play with her, which is what she considers friends.

On a different note - Today I typed up a time table for doing school and for not doing school.  It was the easiest day of school we have had since we started, in 6 years.


Quoting kirbymom:

I think she just may need some time to make the connection from what she is absolute sure of,  to the direct changing of what she is absolute sure of.  Sometimes its the time and the repetition of, that makes that connection.  One of my sons is the same way. If its 2:43, we say its close enough to say its a quarter til 3 but he will say it's NOT a quarter til 3 that its 2:43. Drives me nuts, I tell you. :)  



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Silverkitty
by Bronze Member on Oct. 5, 2012 at 12:54 PM

She is great at math and can do many things in her head.  UNTIL it comes to word problems.  It's like some foreign language to her.   She is okay with things that tell her EXACTLY what to do on her own, but if it tells her to outline something or write a summary she is SO lost, I'll ask her and she can tell me everything.  She is getting better with outlines, but summaries are still a challenge.

sheila5745
by on Oct. 5, 2012 at 1:01 PM


Quoting downsouthjunkin:

 My DD sounds kind of like yours. A lot of times I have to explain things to her (that most kids get very readily) and she has problems with abstract thought/visualizing math concepts in her head. We are pretty sure that she has a combo of Aspergers/ADD/ADHD with some sensory and anxiety issues thrown in. She is undiagnosed though. Does your DD have problems with making friends? I'm now in the process of trying to locate other children in the area that are on the spectrum. I've come to the conclusion that the chance of her making friends with kids that are not on the spectrum is very slim.

it's sad but I know what you mean. My child has autism with M.R. and she has her cousins that understand her. She doesn't have any mainstream kids as friends. We are in Ohio, I haven't found a homeschooling group yet for friends.

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