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Determining the Importance of ......

Posted by on Jan. 15, 2013 at 1:47 PM
  • 34 Replies

 What subjects are determined to be the most important and ....

Are you teaching/gearing towards a job or career in a specific field for your child(ren)?  

  

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by on Jan. 15, 2013 at 1:47 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Silverkitty
by Bronze Member on Jan. 15, 2013 at 1:53 PM

The subjects that I determine are important are ones that will help my daughter communicate and succeed in life.  With her being artistic, I do try to teach towards that, but still make sure she can do what is expected of her to get to college, if she chooses to go.

AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Jan. 15, 2013 at 1:59 PM

The three R's and religious education take priority here, at first. With our daughter, science is just as important now that she is hitting junior high age. We are prepping all of our children for a career in STEM, medicine, or education and an overall college experience. It's been my husband's experience (and my own) over the years that these are the most stable positions. Of course there are exceptions, but most of those I know who are out of work, or have been out of work for a long time/working in retail or fast food completely out of their field of study, have degrees in things like history, literature, political science, etc - not that those aren't important areas of study, but there doesn't seem to be much of a market for them. We try to give a good amount of time to history, but it's difficult because nobody in the house really cares for it, so it tends to be a textbook/take notes/memorize important dates subject for us.

Our children appear to take after daddy though, so it appears we won't meet with any resistance (and if we ever did, we would certainly reconsider). DD11 wants to go into medicine or speech/language pathology (or she wants to be an FBI agent like she sees on Criminal Minds, lol).

I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff: we have traditional gender roles, we're Catholic, I'm Libertarian, he's Republican, we're both conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee














usmom3
by BJ on Jan. 15, 2013 at 2:04 PM

 What ever they want to learn is the most important in that moment in time.

energygirl
by Member on Jan. 15, 2013 at 2:27 PM

For our family, having a Christian influence is important.  I also feel strongly that my children need to be proficient readers (since the reading level of kids in public schools is going down).  Math Science and History are important as well.  As my kids grown and we determine their talents....I hope to teach them in a way that prepares them for success in a career of their chose

kirbymom
by Sonja on Jan. 15, 2013 at 2:29 PM

That certainly is a good place to jump from.  

Quoting Silverkitty:

The subjects that I determine are important are ones that will help my daughter communicate and succeed in life.  With her being artistic, I do try to teach towards that, but still make sure she can do what is expected of her to get to college, if she chooses to go.


irvinehiker
by Andrea on Jan. 15, 2013 at 2:29 PM

 IMO reading and writing are most important.  I'm not gearing towards any specific career at this point.  I want my kids to follow their natural passions and talents.  When I was in school I learned certain subjects b/c everybody told me I should.  I went to college b/c people told me I should.  I made those choices b/c that's what other people wanted for me, maybe not what I wanted.  When I was in my early 20's I had no idea who I was as a person or what I was good at.  Everything I had done was tied up in what other people thought I should do or be.   By allowing my children to follow their talents they will discover what they are naturally good at it, not what other people think they should do.  Hope that makes sense.     

kirbymom
by Sonja on Jan. 15, 2013 at 2:34 PM

My husband and I love history but it seems that none of our kids got the bug. Unless the history has to do with wars or something like that, they would just as soon as leave it be to others who do like it. :)  

We have had those same discussions in our house as well.  

Quoting AutymsMommy:

The three R's and religious education take priority here, at first. With our daughter, science is just as important now that she is hitting junior high age. We are prepping all of our children for a career in STEM, medicine, or education and an overall college experience. It's been my husband's experience (and my own) over the years that these are the most stable positions. Of course there are exceptions, but most of those I know who are out of work, or have been out of work for a long time/working in retail or fast food completely out of their field of study, have degrees in things like history, literature, political science, etc - not that those aren't important areas of study, but there doesn't seem to be much of a market for them. We try to give a good amount of time to history, but it's difficult because nobody in the house really cares for it, so it tends to be a textbook/take notes/memorize important dates subject for us.

Our children appear to take after daddy though, so it appears we won't meet with any resistance (and if we ever did, we would certainly reconsider). DD11 wants to go into medicine or speech/language pathology (or she wants to be an FBI agent like she sees on Criminal Minds, lol).

Great goals to work towards. 

kirbymom
by Sonja on Jan. 15, 2013 at 2:39 PM

I think that is definitely has its place in learning!  Sometimes that is the only way for a child to learn. 

Quoting usmom3:

 What ever they want to learn is the most important in that moment in time.


kirbymom
by Sonja on Jan. 15, 2013 at 2:41 PM

Is your curriculum christian based then?  And do you teach to your specific faith? 

Quoting energygirl:

For our family, having a Christian influence is important.  I also feel strongly that my children need to be proficient readers (since the reading level of kids in public schools is going down).  Math Science and History are important as well.  As my kids grown and we determine their talents....I hope to teach them in a way that prepares them for success in a career of their chose


kirbymom
by Sonja on Jan. 15, 2013 at 2:44 PM

Yes it does. It make perfect sense.  I grew up the same way as yourself.  So, letting a child learn how to decide what he or she likes or dis-likes is a great start in figuring out who they are.  :) 

Quoting irvinehiker:

 IMO reading and writing are most important.  I'm not gearing towards any specific career at this point.  I want my kids to follow their natural passions and talents.  When I was in school I learned certain subjects b/c everybody told me I should.  I went to college b/c people told me I should.  I made those choices b/c that's what other people wanted for me, maybe not what I wanted.  When I was in my early 20's I had no idea who I was as a person or what I was good at.  Everything I had done was tied up in what other people thought I should do or be.   By allowing my children to follow their talents they will discover what they are naturally good at it, not what other people think they should do.  Hope that makes sense.     


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