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Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

Unschooling?

Posted by on Jan. 22, 2013 at 11:20 AM
  • 29 Replies

I am new to the homeschool world, and keep seeing the word unschooling... was wondering what it was. and how it is done. Thanks!

by on Jan. 22, 2013 at 11:20 AM
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Mommy2Emmau
by on Jan. 22, 2013 at 11:29 AM
Basically no structure and the kids learn what they want, when they want, how they want. I personally can't see it working well... LoL At least not for my kid. We do a curriculum but rather than just talking and explaining and doing seat work, I make it as hands on and active as possible for dd. Like writing our letters in shaving cream on the bathtub wall or finger painting them. She retains things better that way and then has more patience when it is time to sit with pencil and paper. : )
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Boobah
by Nikki :) on Jan. 22, 2013 at 11:53 AM
3 moms liked this
I would ask someone who actually unschools to.get a good definition. I can tell you the above isnt true. Lol!
We started off classical/charlotte mason, went more charlotte mason, and are now waldorf which has an unschool feel to it.
You learn through living, and provide opportunities for learning that arent just "here is a textbook and workbook". When a child is interested in something, they retain it better, and you c an help by providing materials and opportunities for them to further their knowledge.
I will let an unschooler help me explain :)
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Boobah
by Nikki :) on Jan. 22, 2013 at 11:55 AM
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I have to say, I thought "ummm... No" when I first started homeschooling. The more I learn about it, and the more I see how traditional schooling isnt working for my kids, I see how beneficial unschooling is. I was public schooled, but I am an unschooler by nature. When something interests me, I tend to teach myself about it by reading, researching, talking to people who know about it, etc :)
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irvinehiker
by Andrea on Jan. 22, 2013 at 1:47 PM
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After another failed attempt at pre written curriculum we are transitioning into unschooling.  I have 2 kids age 9 & 11.  I've tried many times to try to fit them into someone else's box of what learning means.  It simply does not work.  I've even tried very relaxed curruculums, it still does not work.    Unschooling is child led, passion driven learning.  Learning through life.  We use time4learning.com and whatever else the kids want to do.  I do write out a lesson plan for each week.  Their lesson plan is a cooperative plan between me and the kids.  I write what needs to get done on time4learning, a weekly reading assignsment and they make one goal they would like to accomplish by the end of the week.  At the end of the week they journal about additional things they learned through the week.  I don't limit TV or internet time.  They have shown me that they can make reasonable choices where those are concerned.  Many days they don't even watch TV.  This week my daughter is learning about various cat breeds.  She is researching where they originated from and their history.  She is also working on learning french.  My son is very interested in classical music, instruments, and composers.  He spends a good part of his day researching composers, the music they wrote, etc.  We are planning a field trip to a local school(a friend does substitute teaching there)to tour the band room and meet the music teacher.  We also know a high school student at our church who plays cello, so we are going to set up a time for him to come and play his instrument.  

I would encourage you to fully research unschooling.  Many homeschoolers don't understand what unschooling truly is and just assume it is "the easy way out"  or that it is not possible to provide a good education, this is not true.  I will say that you can't truly understand unschooling and its benefits until you experience it first hand.  

Here are some important names in the unschooling world( I would link, but my computer is not cooperating today.)  Just google search these :)

John Holt(wrote many books on the subject, known as the person who coined the term "unschooling")

Pat Farenga an advocate for unschooling who unschooled his three children.  He has a website and blog.

Sandra Dodd also unschooled her children.  She has a great website.

Check out youtube and look for "astra taylor."  She is an independent film maker who was unschooled along with her three siblings.  Also check  out other stuff on youtube.  There's some good info there, be careful though some of it is very biased.    



romacox
by Silver Member on Jan. 22, 2013 at 1:49 PM
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Unschooling focuses on the individual child's self initiative, needs and interests for education. Many think this method has no discipline or direction because the full fledged unschoolers often have no set bedtimes, no set lessons, and no set food rules. But the hard core unschooling parent points out they do make rules on the important things like safety.

They also say there is no such thing as a partial use of unschooling. Either you trust the child's natural tendency to learn or you don't. However others disagree, and I caution the reader not to be too quick to reject this method. It, in my opinion, can be incorporated in ones homeschool schedule, and be very beneficial to you and your child.

Unschooling (or at least a form of it) is particularly attractive to the NT parent, and beneficial to the Nt Child (ratrional personality). My little brother is what is referred to as the NT or "Rational Personality". He often ditched his elementary school classes. So one day the school principle followed him only to discover Billy was going to the local library to study subjects that interested him. You see the NT personality has an insensible appetite to learn, but is totally bored reviewing subjects that he has already grasped, or proving to others he has learned something he has already mastered. He considers it a total waste of time...one can be learning instead of wasting time in this manner. Note: Einstein was an NT. Allowing these children to direct their own learning (at least to some extent) helps to develop their unique gifts.

In this style of homeschooling, it is important to understand the child in depth, and to provide a variety of activities, and learning tools that interests him or her. Lagos or Barbie dolls can become learning tools. Just as my little brother chose his preferred method and subjects to learn, so does the unschooled child.

My Father was also an NT personality, and I learned more for him about analytical thinking than I did in any class room. So nurture the rational child, and allow him to contribute his unique gifts to your family.

The Unschooling Handbook : How to Use the Whole World As Your Child's ClassroomSchool-Age Children Books)

womanwifemomof3
by on Jan. 22, 2013 at 1:54 PM

http://joyfullyrejoycing.com/

check this out

jen2150
by Silver Member on Jan. 22, 2013 at 2:07 PM

We are quassi unschoolers.  We use curriculum but only ones my children enjoy.  If they don't want to do an assignment they simply come up with their own.  I believe in the benefit of following their interests.  I made two objectives when I started homeschooling.  I wanted them to love learning and to love books.  I make lesson plans and then just play it by ear.  My sons are free to learn in a multitude of different ways.  There are different levels of unschooling.  Unschooling refers to child led learning.  Understanding that children develop at different speeds.  They are ready for things at different times.  The home environment is very important while unschooling.  I lead by example.  If I want my child to love books and learning then I must love those things as well.  My sons pick their own spelling words and then decide how they want to learn them.  My youngest decided he wanted to play word jong on the wii.  We played together and had so much fun and he learned so much.  I love experimenting with all my sons ideas.  They are always interesting.

usmom3
by BJ on Jan. 22, 2013 at 2:21 PM

 We unschool & just like no 2 homeschools look the same no 2 unschools look the same. Here are a few links to help you see what I mean.

http://kbnelson.wordpress.com/2011/08/30/the-truth-about-unschooling/

http://www.naturalchild.org/guest/earl_stevens.html

http://www.leapingfromthebox.com/art/kmg/whatis.html

AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Jan. 22, 2013 at 2:52 PM


The above is true. She simply stated that it wouldn't work in her home - it wouldn't work well in mine either. Lol.

I know several unschoolers - they proudly define themselves much the way the first poster did; unstructured and child led. There's nothing wrong with that - it just wouldn't work for everyone.

Quoting Boobah:

I would ask someone who actually unschools to.get a good definition. I can tell you the above isnt true. Lol!
We started off classical/charlotte mason, went more charlotte mason, and are now waldorf which has an unschool feel to it.
You learn through living, and provide opportunities for learning that arent just "here is a textbook and workbook". When a child is interested in something, they retain it better, and you c an help by providing materials and opportunities for them to further their knowledge.
I will let an unschooler help me explain :)



I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff: we have traditional gender roles, we're Catholic, I'm Libertarian, he's Republican, we're both conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee














ms-superwoman
by on Jan. 22, 2013 at 2:58 PM

It is where parents don't school their children. They don't make them learn and basically let them do whatever they want. The idea is that kids learn on their own and if they want to learn about something, they will do it themselves. If they don't so be it, they wont learn it.

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