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A Mother's Letter of Concern.......

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I am a mother of 7 children. So when I read this, I was shocked and to tell you the truth, a bit unsettled. Not by what is going on as much as to THE DEPTH of what is going on.  This is a letter that I believer every parent should read.  I hope you take the time to read this letter and ponder for yourselves the meaning and questions that are asked by this very concerned mother.

A Mother Speaks Out: Children For Sale – Guest  

Children for Sale


By Alyson Williams


No more decisions behind closed doors!  Let’s get everyone talking about Common Core.

In the spring of 2011 I received a receipt for the sale of my children.  It came in the form of a flyer that simply notified me that my state and thereby my children’s school would comply with the Common Core. No  other details of the transaction were included. The transaction was  complete, and I had no say. In fact, it was the very first time I’d  heard about it.


I know what you’re thinking. That’s outrageous! Common  Core has nothing to do with selling things, especially not children!


Okay, so the idea that the State School Board and Governor who’d made this  decision could be described as “selling” my children is hyperbole. It is an exaggeration intended to convey an emotion regarding who, in this land of the free, has ultimate authority over decisions that directly affect my children’s  intellectual development, privacy, and future opportunities. It is not even an accurate representation  of my initial reaction to the flyer. I say it to make a point  that I didn’t realize until much, much later… this isn’t just an issue of education, but of money and control. Please allow me to explain.


That first day my husband picked up the flyer and asked me, “What is Common Core?” To be honest, I had no idea. We looked it up online.  We read that they were standards for each grade that would be consistent across a number of states. They were described as higher standards, internationally benchmarked, state-led, and inclusive of parent and teacher in-put. It didn’t sound like a bad thing, but why hadn’t we ever heard about it before? Again, did I miss the parent in-put meeting or questionnaire… the vote in our legislature? Who from my state had helped to write the standards? In consideration of the decades of disagreement on education trends that I’ve observed regarding education, how in the world did that many states settle all their differences enough to agree on the same standards? It must have taken years, right? How could I have missed it?


At first it was really difficult to get answers to all my questions. I started by asking the people who were in charge of implementing the standards at the school district office, and later talked with my representative on the local school board. I made phone calls and I went to public meetings. We talked a lot about the standards themselves. No one seemed to know the answers to, or wanted to talk about my questions about how the decision was made, the cost, or how it influenced my ability as a parent to advocate for my children regarding curriculum. I even had the chance to ask the Governor himself at a couple of local political meetings. I was always given a similar response. It usually went something like this:


Question: “How much will this cost?”


Answer: “These are really good standards.”


Question: “I read that the Algebra that was offered in 8th grade, will now not be offered until 9th grade. How is this a higher standard?”


Answer: “These are better standards. They go deeper into concepts.”


Question: “Was there a public meeting that I missed?”


Answer: “You should really read the standards. This is a good thing.”


Question: “Isn’t it against the Constitution and the law of the land to have a national curriculum under the control of the federal government?’


Answer: “Don’t you want your kids to have the best curriculum?”


It got to the point where I felt like I was talking to Jedi masters who, instead of actually answering my questions, would wave their hand in my face and say, “You will like these standards.”


I stopped asking. I started reading.


I read the standards. I read about who wrote the standards. I read about the timeline of how we adopted the standards (before the standards were written.) I read my state’s Race to the Top grant application, in which we said we were going to adopt the standards. I read the rejection of that grant application and why we wouldn’t be given additional funding to pay for this commitment. I read how standardized national test scores are measured and how states are ranked. I read news articles, blogs, technical documents, legislation, speeches given by the US Education Secretary and other principle players, and even a few international resolutions regarding education.


I learned a lot.


I learned that most other parents didn’t know what the Common Core was either.


I learned that the standards were state accepted, but definitely not “state led.”


I learned that the international benchmark claim is a pretty shaky one and doesn’t mean they are better than or even equal to international standards that are considered high.


I learned that there was NO public input before the standards were adopted. State-level decision makers had very little time themselves and had to agree to them in principle as the actual standards were not yet complete.


I learned that the only content experts on the panel to review the standards had refused to sign off on them, and why they thought the standards were flawed.


I learned that much of the specific standards are not supported by research but are considered experimental.


I learned that in addition to national standards we agreed to new national tests that are funded and controlled by the federal government.


I learned that in my state, a portion of teacher pay is dependent on student test performance.


I learned that not only test scores, but additional personal information about my children and our family would be tracked in a state-wide data collection project for the express purpose of making decisions about their educational path and “aligning” them with the workforce.


I learned that there are fields for tracking home-schooled children in this database too.


I learned that the first step toward getting pre-school age children into this data project is currently underway with new legislation that would start a new state preschool program.


I learned that this data project was federally funded with a stipulation that it be compatible with other state’s data projects. Wouldn’t this feature create a de facto national database of children?


I learned that my parental rights to deny the collection of this data or restrict who has access to it have been changed at the federal level through executive regulation, not the legislative process.


I learned that these rights as protected under state law are currently under review and could also be changed.


I learned that the financing, writing, evaluation, and promotion of the standards had all been done by non-governmental special interest groups with a common agenda.


I learned that their agenda was in direct conflict with what I consider to be the best interests of my children, my family, and even my country.


Yes, I had concerns about the standards themselves, but suddenly that issue seemed small in comparison to the legal, financial, constitutional and representative issues hiding behind the standards and any good intentions to improve the educational experience of my children.


If it was really about the best standards, why did we adopt them before they were even written?


If they are so wonderful that all, or even a majority of parents would jump for joy to have them implemented, why wasn’t there any forum for parental input?


What about the part where I said I felt my children had been sold? I learned that the U.S. market for education is one of the most lucrative – bigger than energy or technology by one account – especially in light of these new national standards that not only create economy of scale for education vendors, but require schools to purchase all new materials, tests and related technology. Almost everything the schools had was suddenly outdated.


When I discovered that the vendors with the biggest market share and in the position to profit the most from this new regulation had actually helped write or finance the standards, the mama bear inside me ROARED!


Could it be that the new standards had more to do with profit than what was best for students? Good thing for their shareholders they were able to avoid a messy process involving parents or their legislative representatives.


As I kept note of the vast sums of money exchanging hands in connection with these standards with none of it going to address the critical needs of my local school – I felt cheated.


When I was told that the end would justify the means, that it was for the common good of our children and our society, and to sit back and trust that they had my children’s best interests at heart – they lost my trust.


As I listened to the Governor and education policy makers on a state and national level speak about my children and their education in terms of tracking, alignment, workforce, and human capital – I was offended.


When I was told that this is a done deal, and there was nothing as a parent or citizen that I could do about it – I was motivated.


Finally, I learned one more very important thing. I am not the only one who feels this way. Across the nation parents grandparents and other concerned citizens are educating themselves, sharing what they have learned and coming together. The problem is, it is not happening fast enough. Digging through all the evidence, as I have done, takes a lot of time – far more time than the most people are able to spend. In order to help, I summarized what I thought was some of the most important information into a flowchart so that others could see at a glance what I was talking about.


I am not asking you to take my word for it. I want people to check the references and question the sources. I am not asking for a vote or for money. I don’t expect everyone to agree with me. I do believe with all my heart that a decision that affects the children of almost every state in the country should not be made without a much broader discussion, validated research, and much greater input from parents and citizens than it was originally afforded.


If you agree I encourage you to share this information. Post it, pin it, email it, tweet it.


No more decisions behind closed doors! Let’s get everyone talking about Common Core.


_________________________________


Thanks to Alyson Williams for permission to publish her story.


Sources for research: http://www.utahnsagainstcommoncore.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/FlowchartSources.pdf



Do you think this mother is right to be concerned?

  

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by on Jan. 23, 2013 at 6:46 PM
Replies (21-29):
oredeb
by on Jan. 24, 2013 at 5:14 PM

 public school! i wonder if they are going to use the common core in the online schools??? like k12, etc????

kirbymom
by Sonja on Jan. 24, 2013 at 5:15 PM

Oh you couldn't be closer to the truth if you tried! :)  I just read last night that the man who wrote the common core standard, is now the head of the College Board of Education!  So College is about to go the way of the primary school system. :(   I agree with you that Trade schools have been given a bad rap. Kids have been told/encouraged to get a degree of a lesser value just to keep them from going to a grade school. And what gets me is the fact that all those jobs are what this country flourished on from the very inception of the country. I also remember stories and such from by-gone times that are being swept under the rug and has been for many a year now. That is why we will only use books that are close to 50+ years or older. We actually have a math book that is older than 100 years. We had our oldest make handwritten copies of the terms and definitions so that we could use the book without destroying the book.  We refuse to use any new or modern day school type book or book in general on educational information.  Most of it is wrong or out right lies. Point in case... Mark Twain. They removed his stories based on a lie. They said that he was a rascist. And wrote from that viewpoint.  He was no more a rascist than you or I. They took out Bambi for the same reasons. More lies.  And unless you  go out and follow the news articles then you just don't know this stuff and then you never think about it anymore and then this stuff just seems to disappear from History like it never happened.  Oh I could rant on and on but that won't accomplish anything. 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

I agree that so many kids are not where they should when beginning college, but I also think that the schools want their number of kids going to college to be high, so they give people that really have no business going to a 4 year college false impression of what they are capable of doing. There is also this cultural idea within the school system, that a trade school is lesser than a 4yr degree. I was shocked to see how people argued against their child going to a beauty school or learning a trade like masonry etc. They would even rather see their child get a degree with very limited applications such as art history than see them use their hands in their work.
I totally agree that we have started viewing education as a business to our detriment. But we are also being sold the idea that the college educated are a better class of people than the artisans of our society. It's very sad to see the stratified action happening within the school system and the way it is being embraced by this generation of teachers. The generation that was taught whole language instead of phonics for example. When we were taught whole language reading, we made the stories, but the system facilitated the stories. Now many of US don't even know the other stories that were discouraged by the system. I am outside of my generation in many ways because my parents are much older than my agemates, so I still got many of the stories they grew up with that had been cast out of the school during my time there. The little house books, the brer rabbit books, etc things that show a different era and a different method of living.
It is truly sad that government officials believe they can mold our system so easily, but it's quite obvious that they can.
I have been studying the rise of the public education system and am sad to say that there was nowhere else for it to go but here. They were actually aiming for this type of a system that would teach children to stand in line and swallow ready made ideas without true critical thinking skills.


Quoting kirbymom:

Me too. Although not about this particular case personally. Just the over all information that has been heading this way since I was in first grade.  I remember when schools had to teach through the phonics program. It really taught most kids how to read. Then one day, my class was told that we were no longer going to be learning through phonics, we will instead be learning something new. Also that day, I over heard some of the teachers talking and they were talking about the reasons why that phonics were not going to be taught in schools anymore. The phonics system was being taken out because they wanted to re-introduce it 20 YEARS later and make it where it had to be bought, to be used.  And you what? That is exactly what happened. And during those 20 years, we have more illiterate children, who've become adults having children who are having more difficulty reading through the public school system now than when phonics was being taught back in the 70's.  And, the public schools have decided it was too cost prohibitive to buy and it would mean that they had to re-vamp what they were doing and that also was too cost prohibitive and so therefore could not and would not buy, the phonics system back. I told my mother about that conversation and she didn't believe me until some of the neighbors started complaining that their children weren't learning to read as quickly or as effectively as before.  I have been watching the decline of the public school system since then.  

When you start thinking of education as a buisness, you lose something very precious. You lose the ability to teach effectively.  And before you think I'm over exaggerating a bit, think long and hard about how our public schools have come along in the past 20-30 years. Every year something new is being implemented  for no particular reason than just trying out something new that the schools had to buy from the BOE and every year we have less educated children graduating until we have a public system that no longer can produce an intellectually, academically inclined student on a national or inter-national level. High school graduates that are inclined to go to College, have to go back through remedial classes because they are not on level where they SHOULD be when entering College for the first time and most of those students flunk out.

GAH! I could go on forever on this subject.  I am so hopping mad because I was one of those students who passed graduation but didn't pass graduation, if you know what I mean.

 Ahhh, see? It's very difficult to wind me down once I start. lol   But I think you all know what I mean.  :)   

Quoting bluerooffarm:

I actually knew quite a bit of this, it was pretty much the same under the nclb act. The states were not allowed to opt out, the publishers of textbooks needed to suddenly reference each lesson with a standard from the list. One of my favorite books was no longer going to be available because the small publishing company couldn't afford to get the lessons crossreferenced with the standards. I was told that if I wanted to write pieces of curriculum for myself as a teacher, then I would need to submit the unit plan to the board in triplicate either the standards referenced in an appendix. It has been heading this way for over a decade now, sadly. It's one of the reasons I homeschool, I hadn't realized that it had affected the rural schools as much, but holy Hannah it is even worse! Here, the school is so afraid to do something against these so called standards that they hand their teachers 4 binders at the beginning of the year, they have a script in them for every day, every lesson. They are not to deviate from the script. If they have children who are not getting the material, the entire school group ie 4 elementary schools will all slow down for that child. At this point they do not cover any word problems until 3 or 4th grade! The only thing they ever do to tie math learning to so what real world applications now doesn't happen for years!!! It's crazy!

Sorry for the vent, but it makes me so mad! As both a mom and an educator! It's like the feds are saying, we know you went to school to learn how to teach, but leave the curriculum to theexpertd! Wth?



kirbymom
by Sonja on Jan. 24, 2013 at 5:24 PM

You said it. There is an agenda going on and not one that has any good in it either. 

Quoting energygirl:

thanks for posting this...it is good to be aware of what we are up against.....and the agenda that some have planned


  

undefined

kirbymom
by Sonja on Jan. 24, 2013 at 5:25 PM

OMG Debbie, they already are!  K12 and any likeminded online program is based on the public school standards.

Quoting oredeb:

 public school! i wonder if they are going to use the common core in the online schools??? like k12, etc????


kirbymom
by Sonja on Jan. 24, 2013 at 5:26 PM

Yeah and then some! :(  

Quoting KickButtMama:

Sounds a lot like No Child Left Behind to me


bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Jan. 24, 2013 at 6:06 PM
1 mom liked this
My boys have already read the jumping frog of Calaveras county by mark twain! They loved it! I taught a lot of things that weren't really allowed. But many teachers just fall in line.
You're right, I could go on and on too, personally I try to show others that they can use critical thinking and teach it to their kids. I have fought a number of school boards and I fear that until the society as a whole changes, we can't expect the school system to change. Until the society changes, the government cannot change either. Sigh!


Quoting kirbymom:

Oh you couldn't be closer to the truth if you tried! :)  I just read last night that the man who wrote the common core standard, is now the head of the College Board of Education!  So College is about to go the way of the primary school system. :(   I agree with you that Trade schools have been given a bad rap. Kids have been told/encouraged to get a degree of a lesser value just to keep them from going to a grade school. And what gets me is the fact that all those jobs are what this country flourished on from the very inception of the country. I also remember stories and such from by-gone times that are being swept under the rug and has been for many a year now. That is why we will only use books that are close to 50+ years or older. We actually have a math book that is older than 100 years. We had our oldest make handwritten copies of the terms and definitions so that we could use the book without destroying the book.  We refuse to use any new or modern day school type book or book in general on educational information.  Most of it is wrong or out right lies. Point in case... Mark Twain. They removed his stories based on a lie. They said that he was a rascist. And wrote from that viewpoint.  He was no more a rascist than you or I. They took out Bambi for the same reasons. More lies.  And unless you  go out and follow the news articles then you just don't know this stuff and then you never think about it anymore and then this stuff just seems to disappear from History like it never happened.  Oh I could rant on and on but that won't accomplish anything. 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

I agree that so many kids are not where they should when beginning college, but I also think that the schools want their number of kids going to college to be high, so they give people that really have no business going to a 4 year college false impression of what they are capable of doing. There is also this cultural idea within the school system, that a trade school is lesser than a 4yr degree. I was shocked to see how people argued against their child going to a beauty school or learning a trade like masonry etc. They would even rather see their child get a degree with very limited applications such as art history than see them use their hands in their work.

I totally agree that we have started viewing education as a business to our detriment. But we are also being sold the idea that the college educated are a better class of people than the artisans of our society. It's very sad to see the stratified action happening within the school system and the way it is being embraced by this generation of teachers. The generation that was taught whole language instead of phonics for example. When we were taught whole language reading, we made the stories, but the system facilitated the stories. Now many of US don't even know the other stories that were discouraged by the system. I am outside of my generation in many ways because my parents are much older than my agemates, so I still got many of the stories they grew up with that had been cast out of the school during my time there. The little house books, the brer rabbit books, etc things that show a different era and a different method of living.

It is truly sad that government officials believe they can mold our system so easily, but it's quite obvious that they can.

I have been studying the rise of the public education system and am sad to say that there was nowhere else for it to go but here. They were actually aiming for this type of a system that would teach children to stand in line and swallow ready made ideas without true critical thinking skills.




Quoting kirbymom:

Me too. Although not about this particular case personally. Just the over all information that has been heading this way since I was in first grade.  I remember when schools had to teach through the phonics program. It really taught most kids how to read. Then one day, my class was told that we were no longer going to be learning through phonics, we will instead be learning something new. Also that day, I over heard some of the teachers talking and they were talking about the reasons why that phonics were not going to be taught in schools anymore. The phonics system was being taken out because they wanted to re-introduce it 20 YEARS later and make it where it had to be bought, to be used.  And you what? That is exactly what happened. And during those 20 years, we have more illiterate children, who've become adults having children who are having more difficulty reading through the public school system now than when phonics was being taught back in the 70's.  And, the public schools have decided it was too cost prohibitive to buy and it would mean that they had to re-vamp what they were doing and that also was too cost prohibitive and so therefore could not and would not buy, the phonics system back. I told my mother about that conversation and she didn't believe me until some of the neighbors started complaining that their children weren't learning to read as quickly or as effectively as before.  I have been watching the decline of the public school system since then.  

When you start thinking of education as a buisness, you lose something very precious. You lose the ability to teach effectively.  And before you think I'm over exaggerating a bit, think long and hard about how our public schools have come along in the past 20-30 years. Every year something new is being implemented  for no particular reason than just trying out something new that the schools had to buy from the BOE and every year we have less educated children graduating until we have a public system that no longer can produce an intellectually, academically inclined student on a national or inter-national level. High school graduates that are inclined to go to College, have to go back through remedial classes because they are not on level where they SHOULD be when entering College for the first time and most of those students flunk out.

GAH! I could go on forever on this subject.  I am so hopping mad because I was one of those students who passed graduation but didn't pass graduation, if you know what I mean.

 Ahhh, see? It's very difficult to wind me down once I start. lol   But I think you all know what I mean.  :)   

Quoting bluerooffarm:

I actually knew quite a bit of this, it was pretty much the same under the nclb act. The states were not allowed to opt out, the publishers of textbooks needed to suddenly reference each lesson with a standard from the list. One of my favorite books was no longer going to be available because the small publishing company couldn't afford to get the lessons crossreferenced with the standards. I was told that if I wanted to write pieces of curriculum for myself as a teacher, then I would need to submit the unit plan to the board in triplicate either the standards referenced in an appendix. It has been heading this way for over a decade now, sadly. It's one of the reasons I homeschool, I hadn't realized that it had affected the rural schools as much, but holy Hannah it is even worse! Here, the school is so afraid to do something against these so called standards that they hand their teachers 4 binders at the beginning of the year, they have a script in them for every day, every lesson. They are not to deviate from the script. If they have children who are not getting the material, the entire school group ie 4 elementary schools will all slow down for that child. At this point they do not cover any word problems until 3 or 4th grade! The only thing they ever do to tie math learning to so what real world applications now doesn't happen for years!!! It's crazy!


Sorry for the vent, but it makes me so mad! As both a mom and an educator! It's like the feds are saying, we know you went to school to learn how to teach, but leave the curriculum to theexpertd! Wth?



Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
homeschoolx3
by on Jan. 25, 2013 at 3:58 PM

Yes I do! It's time we got rid of "Dept. of Ed.", quit trying to imitate countries that hate us, and trowing money at a broken system.

homeschoolx3
by on Jan. 25, 2013 at 4:06 PM
1 mom liked this



Quoting bluerooffarm:

My boys have already read the jumping frog of Calaveras county by mark twain! They loved it! I taught a lot of things that weren't really allowed. But many teachers just fall in line.
You're right, I could go on and on too, personally I try to show others that they can use critical thinking and teach it to their kids. I have fought a number of school boards and I fear that until the society as a whole changes, we can't expect the school system to change. Until the society changes, the government cannot change either. Sigh!


Quoting kirbymom:

Oh you couldn't be closer to the truth if you tried! :)  I just read last night that the man who wrote the common core standard, is now the head of the College Board of Education!  So College is about to go the way of the primary school system. :(   I agree with you that Trade schools have been given a bad rap. Kids have been told/encouraged to get a degree of a lesser value just to keep them from going to a grade school. And what gets me is the fact that all those jobs are what this country flourished on from the very inception of the country. I also remember stories and such from by-gone times that are being swept under the rug and has been for many a year now. That is why we will only use books that are close to 50+ years or older. We actually have a math book that is older than 100 years. We had our oldest make handwritten copies of the terms and definitions so that we could use the book without destroying the book.  We refuse to use any new or modern day school type book or book in general on educational information.  Most of it is wrong or out right lies. Point in case... Mark Twain. They removed his stories based on a lie. They said that he was a rascist. And wrote from that viewpoint.  He was no more a rascist than you or I. They took out Bambi for the same reasons. More lies.  And unless you  go out and follow the news articles then you just don't know this stuff and then you never think about it anymore and then this stuff just seems to disappear from History like it never happened.  Oh I could rant on and on but that won't accomplish anything. 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

I agree that so many kids are not where they should when beginning college, but I also think that the schools want their number of kids going to college to be high, so they give people that really have no business going to a 4 year college false impression of what they are capable of doing. There is also this cultural idea within the school system, that a trade school is lesser than a 4yr degree. I was shocked to see how people argued against their child going to a beauty school or learning a trade like masonry etc. They would even rather see their child get a degree with very limited applications such as art history than see them use their hands in their work.

I totally agree that we have started viewing education as a business to our detriment. But we are also being sold the idea that the college educated are a better class of people than the artisans of our society. It's very sad to see the stratified action happening within the school system and the way it is being embraced by this generation of teachers. The generation that was taught whole language instead of phonics for example. When we were taught whole language reading, we made the stories, but the system facilitated the stories. Now many of US don't even know the other stories that were discouraged by the system. I am outside of my generation in many ways because my parents are much older than my agemates, so I still got many of the stories they grew up with that had been cast out of the school during my time there. The little house books, the brer rabbit books, etc things that show a different era and a different method of living.

It is truly sad that government officials believe they can mold our system so easily, but it's quite obvious that they can.

I have been studying the rise of the public education system and am sad to say that there was nowhere else for it to go but here. They were actually aiming for this type of a system that would teach children to stand in line and swallow ready made ideas without true critical thinking skills.




Quoting kirbymom:

Me too. Although not about this particular case personally. Just the over all information that has been heading this way since I was in first grade.  I remember when schools had to teach through the phonics program. It really taught most kids how to read. Then one day, my class was told that we were no longer going to be learning through phonics, we will instead be learning something new. Also that day, I over heard some of the teachers talking and they were talking about the reasons why that phonics were not going to be taught in schools anymore. The phonics system was being taken out because they wanted to re-introduce it 20 YEARS later and make it where it had to be bought, to be used.  And you what? That is exactly what happened. And during those 20 years, we have more illiterate children, who've become adults having children who are having more difficulty reading through the public school system now than when phonics was being taught back in the 70's.  And, the public schools have decided it was too cost prohibitive to buy and it would mean that they had to re-vamp what they were doing and that also was too cost prohibitive and so therefore could not and would not buy, the phonics system back. I told my mother about that conversation and she didn't believe me until some of the neighbors started complaining that their children weren't learning to read as quickly or as effectively as before.  I have been watching the decline of the public school system since then.  

When you start thinking of education as a buisness, you lose something very precious. You lose the ability to teach effectively.  And before you think I'm over exaggerating a bit, think long and hard about how our public schools have come along in the past 20-30 years. Every year something new is being implemented  for no particular reason than just trying out something new that the schools had to buy from the BOE and every year we have less educated children graduating until we have a public system that no longer can produce an intellectually, academically inclined student on a national or inter-national level. High school graduates that are inclined to go to College, have to go back through remedial classes because they are not on level where they SHOULD be when entering College for the first time and most of those students flunk out.

GAH! I could go on forever on this subject.  I am so hopping mad because I was one of those students who passed graduation but didn't pass graduation, if you know what I mean.

 Ahhh, see? It's very difficult to wind me down once I start. lol   But I think you all know what I mean.  :)   

Quoting bluerooffarm:

I actually knew quite a bit of this, it was pretty much the same under the nclb act. The states were not allowed to opt out, the publishers of textbooks needed to suddenly reference each lesson with a standard from the list. One of my favorite books was no longer going to be available because the small publishing company couldn't afford to get the lessons crossreferenced with the standards. I was told that if I wanted to write pieces of curriculum for myself as a teacher, then I would need to submit the unit plan to the board in triplicate either the standards referenced in an appendix. It has been heading this way for over a decade now, sadly. It's one of the reasons I homeschool, I hadn't realized that it had affected the rural schools as much, but holy Hannah it is even worse! Here, the school is so afraid to do something against these so called standards that they hand their teachers 4 binders at the beginning of the year, they have a script in them for every day, every lesson. They are not to deviate from the script. If they have children who are not getting the material, the entire school group ie 4 elementary schools will all slow down for that child. At this point they do not cover any word problems until 3 or 4th grade! The only thing they ever do to tie math learning to so what real world applications now doesn't happen for years!!! It's crazy!


Sorry for the vent, but it makes me so mad! As both a mom and an educator! It's like the feds are saying, we know you went to school to learn how to teach, but leave the curriculum to theexpertd! Wth?



Agree with both of you ladies wholeheartedly. As some might say, welcome to the NWO.


SusanTheWriter
by Bronze Member on Jan. 25, 2013 at 7:42 PM

Wait. Who got rid of Mark Twain? DD read Tom Sawyer last year in English in ps. He's not gone.

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