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Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

 Is anyone doing this? If so,do you like it? We are doing Florida Virtual school with connexus curriculum. It's been about 3 weeks and so far I hate it. 

by on Jan. 25, 2013 at 8:41 AM
Replies (21-30):
Simply_Janeen
by on Jan. 25, 2013 at 1:28 PM

THIS. We were with Wisconsin Connections Academy and it's not a bad program per se but absolutely did NOT fit with my daughter's learning style and it got so bad that she ended up hating language arts by the time I pulled her. I should have pulled her out much sooner than I did but held on until after Christmas break and then pulled her out right after that. If I had known how easy it was to do it, I would have pulled her before break. Now, it's really been hard for me to get her to do much of anything because she ended up SO burned out. Granted, her writing has improved but she hates to write and because the math lessons were so short and kind of disjointed, I don't think she really retained her math as well as I thought. So, in some ways, I feel like we're having to start ALL over again. Not in everything but with some of it at least and like I said, it's more of a struggle because it really sucked her joy of learning.

Quoting WantedNameTaken:

If virtual school doesn't seem right, don't stick with it longer than necessary.  It sucked the love of learning right out of my kids. 

Janeen

Homeschooling mom to my two girls: Natalie (6) and Isabelle (2).

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Jan. 25, 2013 at 1:31 PM
1 mom liked this
That was the reason I had decided to go all the way this year. And I really wished I hadn't at this point.
I think ps teachers are the big pushers of that idea. They think because they have to dance around the faith components we should too! Lol


Quoting WantedNameTaken:

That's one of the things that I actually did enjoy about the materials.  We were excited to see many biblical figures mentioned in both literature and history textbooks.

Since K12 has a home-based public school option, there's nothing that says we can't teach our kids about our personal faith, or lack thereof.  I've LOL'd when I've heard people say that the state would run up into houses and tell parents that they couldn't teach faith, because they were using public school materials.  Still LOL'ing.

When my two homeschooled kids were still in B&M public schools, they learned about many different religions in history classes.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

It is public school at home. It is actually fairly open to a Christ interpretation. When we studied ancient civilizations, the story actually said that the waters were parted by the breath of God. Xavier read a story about zlateh the goat where God kept guiding the boy to safety. It was actually rather amazing what was allowed in a public school setting!



Quoting scoutwifemomof4:

I have a question, a friennd asked me about it & I don't know much about K12.  Is it actual homeschool or is it public school from home?  I was under the impression it was public school from home so we have stayed away from it because one of the reasonns we homeschool is to keep Christ centered in everything we do.  No judging, just looking for more info.  


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Simply_Janeen
by on Jan. 25, 2013 at 1:33 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting CBMMOM:


Quoting WantedNameTaken:

You can do it!  The ladies on this site are immensely helpful and there's a ton of help online and at the library.  I started the year with a boxed curriculum, but quickly stopped using it and bought a ton of books (student and teacher editions) on Amazon for dirt cheap.  We also take advantage of the seemingly infinite, free online worksheets, videos, and such.

If virtual school doesn't seem right, don't stick with it longer than necessary.  It sucked the love of learning right out of my kids.  They're much happier now. :)

Best wishes!

Quoting CBMMOM:


Quoting WantedNameTaken:

We did K12, but dropped it.  We pulled my son before this school year started and pulled my daughter on Tuesday of this week.  Freedom and less stress, here we come! :)

I am very seriously considering taking her out too. I feel like we did better on our own .  I'm glad to see we are not alone.


Thanks for the support! : )  I've already since I started this post,called and withdrawn her from virtual school. I already feel so much better. She's smiling and excited too. 

Great! If you need any lesson ideas, Pinterest has a TON! LOL

Janeen

Homeschooling mom to my two girls: Natalie (6) and Isabelle (2).

CBMMOM
by on Jan. 25, 2013 at 1:35 PM


Quoting Simply_Janeen:


Quoting CBMMOM:


Quoting WantedNameTaken:

You can do it!  The ladies on this site are immensely helpful and there's a ton of help online and at the library.  I started the year with a boxed curriculum, but quickly stopped using it and bought a ton of books (student and teacher editions) on Amazon for dirt cheap.  We also take advantage of the seemingly infinite, free online worksheets, videos, and such.

If virtual school doesn't seem right, don't stick with it longer than necessary.  It sucked the love of learning right out of my kids.  They're much happier now. :)

Best wishes!

Quoting CBMMOM:


Quoting WantedNameTaken:

We did K12, but dropped it.  We pulled my son before this school year started and pulled my daughter on Tuesday of this week.  Freedom and less stress, here we come! :)

I am very seriously considering taking her out too. I feel like we did better on our own .  I'm glad to see we are not alone.


Thanks for the support! : )  I've already since I started this post,called and withdrawn her from virtual school. I already feel so much better. She's smiling and excited too. 

Great! If you need any lesson ideas, Pinterest has a TON! LOL

Oh yeah, I didn't even think of that. : )

WantedNameTaken
by Member on Jan. 25, 2013 at 1:54 PM

It really did cause burnout for my DD as well and just didn't suit her learning style.

As far as starting all over, that's how science is for us.  Our state decided to slow down science for 7th-graders who were already in the system to allow new 7th-graders to catch up next year (it's all designed to align with the ever-changing state assessments). For example, my 7th-grade DD had been with K12 since 5th grade and one of her BFF's just started this year (7th grade also).  DD and all other "veteran" 7th-grade k12'ers in our state were told to only complete 50% of their life science class  this year and do the other 50% next year.  Meanwhile, DD's friend is doing 100% earth science this year and will do 100% of life science next year.  DD had earth science in grade six.  When DS was in K12's program as a 7th-grader, he did life science in 7th and physical science in 8th.  Confused yet?  LOL!

Since we only had to do half of life science this year, I'm working almost double-time to get DD up to speed, so that she can study physical science next year and then biology as a freshman.  The good thing is that I've cut out the busywork, so it shouldn't take too long to get where we need to be.

Allowing your DD to help choose what and how she learns may just revive her love for learning.  If she can do some things in a cozy place (far away from a computer LOL!), she may also start to see the light at the end of the tunnel.

Best wishes!

Quoting Simply_Janeen:

THIS. We were with Wisconsin Connections Academy and it's not a bad program per se but absolutely did NOT fit with my daughter's learning style and it got so bad that she ended up hating language arts by the time I pulled her. I should have pulled her out much sooner than I did but held on until after Christmas break and then pulled her out right after that. If I had known how easy it was to do it, I would have pulled her before break. Now, it's really been hard for me to get her to do much of anything because she ended up SO burned out. Granted, her writing has improved but she hates to write and because the math lessons were so short and kind of disjointed, I don't think she really retained her math as well as I thought. So, in some ways, I feel like we're having to start ALL over again. Not in everything but with some of it at least and like I said, it's more of a struggle because it really sucked her joy of learning.

Quoting WantedNameTaken:

If virtual school doesn't seem right, don't stick with it longer than necessary.  It sucked the love of learning right out of my kids. 


mary8801
by on Jan. 25, 2013 at 2:08 PM

This is what my 6th grader is doing and it's a lot of work for both the parent and child. I am her Learning Coach and it's a lot of work for me and my daughter absolutely hates it. The only positive thing really is the flexibilty of the coursework like yesterday we played hooky and went to Clearwater but today she's playing catch-up. The teachers contact you once a month to fill you in on the progress but the amount of portfolios and lab reports is amazing because in the regular public school system they are not requiring this much work. Plus you have to be a computer whiz on knowing the different programs and software etc etc. Good luck!!! I remember when we started every night I felt like crying because we stayed behind on the course work, but now things are better, since we have more of a handle on it. 

Simply_Janeen
by on Jan. 25, 2013 at 2:30 PM

Actually, she liked the computer stuff (so long as it wasn't typing, that was brutal). But keep in mind, she's only a first grader so they weren't doing that much on the computer and when I did her lessons, I usually did not have her sit at the computer. I used the books most of the time so her computer use was fairly limited. She LOVED science and art but the language arts was getting to be way too much for her, lots of writing and the reading was too easy for her.

Quoting WantedNameTaken:

It really did cause burnout for my DD as well and just didn't suit her learning style.

As far as starting all over, that's how science is for us.  Our state decided to slow down science for 7th-graders who were already in the system to allow new 7th-graders to catch up next year (it's all designed to align with the ever-changing state assessments). For example, my 7th-grade DD had been with K12 since 5th grade and one of her BFF's just started this year (7th grade also).  DD and all other "veteran" 7th-grade k12'ers in our state were told to only complete 50% of their life science class  this year and do the other 50% next year.  Meanwhile, DD's friend is doing 100% earth science this year and will do 100% of life science next year.  DD had earth science in grade six.  When DS was in K12's program as a 7th-grader, he did life science in 7th and physical science in 8th.  Confused yet?  LOL!

Since we only had to do half of life science this year, I'm working almost double-time to get DD up to speed, so that she can study physical science next year and then biology as a freshman.  The good thing is that I've cut out the busywork, so it shouldn't take too long to get where we need to be.

Allowing your DD to help choose what and how she learns may just revive her love for learning.  If she can do some things in a cozy place (far away from a computer LOL!), she may also start to see the light at the end of the tunnel.

Best wishes!

Quoting Simply_Janeen:

THIS. We were with Wisconsin Connections Academy and it's not a bad program per se but absolutely did NOT fit with my daughter's learning style and it got so bad that she ended up hating language arts by the time I pulled her. I should have pulled her out much sooner than I did but held on until after Christmas break and then pulled her out right after that. If I had known how easy it was to do it, I would have pulled her before break. Now, it's really been hard for me to get her to do much of anything because she ended up SO burned out. Granted, her writing has improved but she hates to write and because the math lessons were so short and kind of disjointed, I don't think she really retained her math as well as I thought. So, in some ways, I feel like we're having to start ALL over again. Not in everything but with some of it at least and like I said, it's more of a struggle because it really sucked her joy of learning.

Quoting WantedNameTaken:

If virtual school doesn't seem right, don't stick with it longer than necessary.  It sucked the love of learning right out of my kids. 



Janeen

Homeschooling mom to my two girls: Natalie (6) and Isabelle (2).

Simply_Janeen
by on Jan. 25, 2013 at 2:32 PM

We ended up WAY behind, to the point where we ended up with a truency notice. We would have gotten a second one if I hadn't pulled her out. And not only was DD burned out but I was too! It was just WAY too much! And the bad thing is, I barely did anything with her homeschooling wise last year (for Kindgarten) and she was ahead in a number of areas so I don't know. I'm just trying to get it all figured out.

Quoting mary8801:

This is what my 6th grader is doing and it's a lot of work for both the parent and child. I am her Learning Coach and it's a lot of work for me and my daughter absolutely hates it. The only positive thing really is the flexibilty of the coursework like yesterday we played hooky and went to Clearwater but today she's playing catch-up. The teachers contact you once a month to fill you in on the progress but the amount of portfolios and lab reports is amazing because in the regular public school system they are not requiring this much work. Plus you have to be a computer whiz on knowing the different programs and software etc etc. Good luck!!! I remember when we started every night I felt like crying because we stayed behind on the course work, but now things are better, since we have more of a handle on it. 


Janeen

Homeschooling mom to my two girls: Natalie (6) and Isabelle (2).

WantedNameTaken
by Member on Jan. 25, 2013 at 2:48 PM

Virtual school was computer-intensive for us; lots of mandatory online classes. Middle school classes could be skipped without getting nastygrams (depending on the teacher), but skipped high school classes were considered an absence. So much for going at your own pace.

We've never had art or science textbooks, so those classes always required a ton of online reading.  Each literature assignment had tons of online reading as well, but they'd go offline to read the main literary works (poems, novels, plays, etc.) and then return online to finish the "Check Your Reading" portion of assignments.  I printed all assessments, but they still had to enter their responses online.

Study Island is a requirement and the only way to do that is online.  Not to mention the Study Island benchmark tests 3x/year and Scantron assessments 2x/year.  At least the statewide testing was done in person.

We LOVE technology, but needed to scale back and let the kids wrap up in the warmth of actual books instead of having to be tethered to computers all day.  It's easier to escape into the world about which you're reading when you can "touch" it, I think.  The kids still do a lot of online research, type papers and presentations, and watch educational videos, but are not required to do so all day.  Books also allow us to "port" work to the road, if needed, and do not require computers or internet access.

Gasp as your little one having to do a lot of typing!  I'm sure she's happy that's over now. :)

Quoting Simply_Janeen:

Actually, she liked the computer stuff (so long as it wasn't typing, that was brutal). But keep in mind, she's only a first grader so they weren't doing that much on the computer and when I did her lessons, I usually did not have her sit at the computer. I used the books most of the time so her computer use was fairly limited. She LOVED science and art but the language arts was getting to be way too much for her, lots of writing and the reading was too easy for her.

Quoting WantedNameTaken:

It really did cause burnout for my DD as well and just didn't suit her learning style.

As far as starting all over, that's how science is for us.  Our state decided to slow down science for 7th-graders who were already in the system to allow new 7th-graders to catch up next year (it's all designed to align with the ever-changing state assessments). For example, my 7th-grade DD had been with K12 since 5th grade and one of her BFF's just started this year (7th grade also).  DD and all other "veteran" 7th-grade k12'ers in our state were told to only complete 50% of their life science class  this year and do the other 50% next year.  Meanwhile, DD's friend is doing 100% earth science this year and will do 100% of life science next year.  DD had earth science in grade six.  When DS was in K12's program as a 7th-grader, he did life science in 7th and physical science in 8th.  Confused yet?  LOL!

Since we only had to do half of life science this year, I'm working almost double-time to get DD up to speed, so that she can study physical science next year and then biology as a freshman.  The good thing is that I've cut out the busywork, so it shouldn't take too long to get where we need to be.

Allowing your DD to help choose what and how she learns may just revive her love for learning.  If she can do some things in a cozy place (far away from a computer LOL!), she may also start to see the light at the end of the tunnel.

Best wishes!

Quoting Simply_Janeen:

THIS. We were with Wisconsin Connections Academy and it's not a bad program per se but absolutely did NOT fit with my daughter's learning style and it got so bad that she ended up hating language arts by the time I pulled her. I should have pulled her out much sooner than I did but held on until after Christmas break and then pulled her out right after that. If I had known how easy it was to do it, I would have pulled her before break. Now, it's really been hard for me to get her to do much of anything because she ended up SO burned out. Granted, her writing has improved but she hates to write and because the math lessons were so short and kind of disjointed, I don't think she really retained her math as well as I thought. So, in some ways, I feel like we're having to start ALL over again. Not in everything but with some of it at least and like I said, it's more of a struggle because it really sucked her joy of learning.

Quoting WantedNameTaken:

If virtual school doesn't seem right, don't stick with it longer than necessary.  It sucked the love of learning right out of my kids. 




CBMMOM
by on Jan. 25, 2013 at 2:52 PM


Quoting mary8801:

This is what my 6th grader is doing and it's a lot of work for both the parent and child. I am her Learning Coach and it's a lot of work for me and my daughter absolutely hates it. The only positive thing really is the flexibilty of the coursework like yesterday we played hooky and went to Clearwater but today she's playing catch-up. The teachers contact you once a month to fill you in on the progress but the amount of portfolios and lab reports is amazing because in the regular public school system they are not requiring this much work. Plus you have to be a computer whiz on knowing the different programs and software etc etc. Good luck!!! I remember when we started every night I felt like crying because we stayed behind on the course work, but now things are better, since we have more of a handle on it. 

Are you supposed to have 2 computers for this? I would get instructions like "point to whatever on student's screen".  I tried to use seperate tabs to have both mine and hers logged on at the same time,but that didn't work. I felt very overwhelmed by this whole program..

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