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Teaching my child to read is dfficult :(

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I love reading, as does dh. I thought teaching dd1 would be easy, but it's proving to be otherwise. She will be 6 tomorrow and can read a few sight words. I'm trying to teach her how to sound out words, but she gets so distracted and doesn't seem interested. She is constantly mixing up "d' and "b", "m" and "w', and just doesn't focus. I end up cutting our lessons short, because I get frustrated. I feel like a failure, becuase it seems like my dd is the only kid not reading at her age. What can I do? Any help, advice, or tips would be greatly appreciated.

by on Jan. 25, 2013 at 1:17 PM
Replies (11-20):
Donna.June
by Member on Jan. 25, 2013 at 1:42 PM

She doesn't do the lessons, she just plays around with it.

Quoting AllofFive19:

Have you tried Starfall.com? That's a good site for reading and may make it fun for her.


KrissyKC
by Silver Member on Jan. 25, 2013 at 1:48 PM

Play games that help her be more active and learn to pay attention to the letters..

Write the difficult letters that kinda look alike (like d, b, lower case a, maybe even p and q as she is ready and needs them)...  write them on cards then scatter around the room and have her jump to them as you call them out...   put them on two opposite walls and have her "slap" them with a clean flyswatter, even cut out the center of the swatter so she can see the letter after she slaps it.

As she gets good at recognizing them by sight, say a word that begins with various tricky letters and have her run to the letter it begins with... then ends with...   

Then play games where she can make her own words... once she knows the beginning and ending sounds really well and doesnt' get as stuck on letters that look similar...  

As she is ready for it, you can get videos at the library that reinforce phonics... whatever blend, rhyme, trigraph, etc.. they teach on there.. play slapping games with those after the video is over.

Start having her read signs to you, write her simple notes in the morning for her to find, if you go on a field trip, put the notes in her lunch bag/box that you pack...

She will get it...

My friend's daughter was still struggling at 7 to barely begin to read and she is 11 now and her reading is off the charts.

AllofFive19
by Bronze Member on Jan. 25, 2013 at 1:49 PM

Even playing can help.

Quoting Donna.June:

She doesn't do the lessons, she just plays around with it.

Quoting AllofFive19:

Have you tried Starfall.com? That's a good site for reading and may make it fun for her.



bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Jan. 25, 2013 at 1:50 PM
It's absolutely normal to mix up b and d, p and q, m and w and n and u until around age 8, but even that is just a rule of thumb.
When you feel frustrated, take a deep breath. Each time she confuses a letter just supply the right sound and move on. She's still very young. Relax and have fun reading to her. Point out the site words you cone to when you are reading together. Help her sound out a word or 2 as you read together. You'll get there!
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KrissyKC
by Silver Member on Jan. 25, 2013 at 1:53 PM

present them as math problems... since she likes math...

Tell her she has two letters... "at" that make the at sound...

Then start playing P plus at equals pat....   then subtract the P... add a H instead and see i she can tell you the answer... 

Make it more complex as you go...

Play word bingo games...  those are easy to make, or you can sometimes find them ready made at teacher supply stores...

Buy some magnetic sheeting and make her her own "locker notes" things... you know, where  you put the words together to make silly phrases... Use permanent marker to write the words on the sheet and cut it out, she can do this and do silly words and phrases on the fridge... use words she might know, and add some...   Leave some blank, and when she asks for a word, have the marker ready to add it.


KrissyKC
by Silver Member on Jan. 25, 2013 at 1:55 PM

For Starfall, maybe she'd do more of the lessons if some one sat down and did some of them with her?

For her favorite books, pick a word that you hear a few times in the book and tell her you'll give her a star on her paper every time she finds the magic word on the page before you read it....  when she is good at this, you can give her a list of three words...   if she's past that, only use the difficult words...

I use a phonics program we got off K12 years ago (but don't do K12 anymore)... but I have used that same program because it's amazing.   I don't know if K12 sells JUST that program, but it has worked with two of my good readers now.



cjsix
by Member on Jan. 25, 2013 at 1:56 PM

 Try just doing the phonics of individual letters instead. Get some flash cards with the alphabet on them,when you are doing laundry ask her to help and what letter some of the things you are putting in start with and what sound they make. Do the same when grocery shopping..."what letter does milk start with? What does M say?" things like that. Read to her every night before bed and she will eventually start to tell you the words. I have children who are artistic and at that age more interested in numbers than letters and this worked well.

Donna.June
by Member on Jan. 25, 2013 at 2:06 PM

Thank you for all your advice.

Dd1 and I were working on the lessons together. My other daughters were taking a nap, so no one could distract her. But, she was still distracted :/

Quoting KrissyKC:

For Starfall, maybe she'd do more of the lessons if some one sat down and did some of them with her?

For her favorite books, pick a word that you hear a few times in the book and tell her you'll give her a star on her paper every time she finds the magic word on the page before you read it....  when she is good at this, you can give her a list of three words...   if she's past that, only use the difficult words...

I use a phonics program we got off K12 years ago (but don't do K12 anymore)... but I have used that same program because it's amazing.   I don't know if K12 sells JUST that program, but it has worked with two of my good readers now.




womanwifemomof3
by on Jan. 25, 2013 at 2:16 PM

Just keep reading to her for enjoyment.  Just point and read anything and everything she is interested in with no pressure for her to do it. Frustrating lessons will just make her feel bad about her reading ability and freeze up about it even more.  She may want to figure it out in her head before even letting you know. Let her play on Starfall.com  Also look into Reading Eggs website if she likes online learning. Karaoke is good for learning to read too or put closed caption on the tv.  What things interest her?  Find books, magazines, or websites on topics she really enjoys and read them to her and casually point with your hand or the mouse if its online. Let her sit on your lap and you type emails to friends and relatives.  You sound out some words as you type and she will start picking it up.   You don't have to give a report to anyone.  Relatives don't even need a report on how her reading is going.  She doesn't have to perform for any relatives either.   I really believe people teach kids how to read in the same way they teach kids how to walk.  It's a useful skill that everyone else is doing.  You can provide lots of great resources and encouragement but ultimately they learn it on their own in their own way regardless of what we do.  So keep it positive.  You are right to drop any lesson that frustrates you with her.  That's obviously not the way she's going to learn it.

romacox
by Silver Member on Jan. 25, 2013 at 6:32 PM
1 mom liked this

With the right tools, and a little information, you will find it  fun and easy to teach her to read.  My children are all grown, but I still tutor (K through 6Th grade),  and   give home school workshops.  My success in helping children learn to  read has been so successful that I have recently been invited to the University Of North Florida to teach teachers how to help children learn to read.

All I use is the board game, "Ring Around The Phonics" (It has everything you need including books), and the kids the kids love it.   I have had them cry if I say we aren't playing the game today.   It also teaches other language arts subjects. I have used it with 6th graders.

The  game comes with instructions, but if you want to make sure you are enunciating the phonic sounds correctly:  Hear Phonic Sounds Free (for Parents...not the child). 

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