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Writing help

Posted by on Feb. 5, 2013 at 9:39 AM
  • 15 Replies

How can I get my 10 year old to write more. She hates to write and when she has an assignment she writes the minimum possible. She also has trouble getting started. But sometimes she surprises me and will write a full page and a half. It just depends on her mood I think. Because it doesn't matter what the subject is.

by on Feb. 5, 2013 at 9:39 AM
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Replies (1-10):
bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Feb. 5, 2013 at 9:51 AM

 What do you want from her?  What subjects do you give her to write?  What's her favorite subject?

paris2lmp
by on Feb. 5, 2013 at 9:59 AM

My 8 yo also hates to write.  I'm still working out a system for us, but here are some suggestions I have tried or that I am going to try:

I started having him write to a pen pal, hoping he would enjoy recieving written letters too.  He is excited about the pen pal, but still didn't want to write the letter, so I told him if he writes this letter then next time he can type it out on the computer.  Maybe alternating between the two will be an acceptable compromise.   He likes to draw, and he likes Captain Underpants (not my favorite, but it gets him enjoying to read) So I'm thinking that allowing him to draw a cartoon along with his writing assignment might be fun.  Bribery, "If you finish writing __________ then you can have an extra 10 min tv time tonight.  But if you instead choose to sit there and whine about your assignment, then you won't get tv tonight."  I try to pick subjects to write about that he is actually interested in, or let him pick the subject, but that only seems to help about half the time. 

Thats about all I've got so far!  I will be interested to see what other moms say though, since this is something I struggle with too!

paris2lmp
by on Feb. 5, 2013 at 10:00 AM

BUMP!

blueyedbaker
by on Feb. 5, 2013 at 10:10 AM

We tried the pen pal thing in 3rd grade. That didn't work to well. She'd write maybe a paragraph but she'd write which was good. She actually still writes to the little girls but nothing big. She absolutely loves to type on the computer. So I'm feel stuck. Usually when she has to write something I make her do her rough draft on paper then the final is typed out on her computer.  I think my problem with it all is that it seems to take her forever to think of something to write about or even when she has a subject it take her a bit to write it all out. She tries harder to make me tell her what to do than it would be to do it herself. Is that normal?

Quoting paris2lmp:

My 8 yo also hates to write.  I'm still working out a system for us, but here are some suggestions I have tried or that I am going to try:

I started having him write to a pen pal, hoping he would enjoy receiving written letters too.  He is excited about the pen pal, but still didn't want to write the letter, so I told him if he writes this letter then next time he can type it out on the computer.  Maybe alternating between the two will be an acceptable compromise.   He likes to draw, and he likes Captain Underpants (not my favorite, but it gets him enjoying to read) So I'm thinking that allowing him to draw a cartoon along with his writing assignment might be fun.  Bribery, "If you finish writing __________ then you can have an extra 10 min tv time tonight.  But if you instead choose to sit there and whine about your assignment, then you won't get tv tonight."  I try to pick subjects to write about that he is actually interested in, or let him pick the subject, but that only seems to help about half the time. 

Thats about all I've got so far!  I will be interested to see what other moms say though, since this is something I struggle with too!


blueyedbaker
by on Feb. 5, 2013 at 10:19 AM

She has a writing skills book and she has a bunch of parts she has to do different writing skills. In that book (and when I have her do the book reports) she doesn't seem to write any more than she thinks is necessary. I'll re-read what, she wrote, to her and then I'll add to it for her to show her how much more she could write to make it more interesting. The next time she writes it's the same she doesn't add any more to her writing. I think I need a way to help her see that when she writes she can add to it to make it better.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 What do you want from her?  What subjects do you give her to write?  What's her favorite subject?


bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Feb. 5, 2013 at 10:33 AM

 I had my 9th graders picture a paragraph like a double cheeseburger. There's the bun which is the topic sentence and the conclusion, the (at least) 2 pieces of cheese and the 2 pieces of meat that make up the main ideas of the paragraph...but then there needs to be the veggies and condiments, the details that support each of the ideas.  

I would have her practice writing as rewriting.  Explain that the final draft needs to be a completed burger.  The first draft is a "down draft" where you just get it down.  In the second draft you make sure there is enough "meat" to explain yourself.  In the third draft you add the condiments (either some supporting details or for more descriptive writing that's when you add the adjectives and adverbs.

That method usually rounded out their writing in a way that bumped up description in their creative writing pieces or clarified their summaries and essays. 

Quoting blueyedbaker:

She has a writing skills book and she has a bunch of parts she has to do different writing skills. In that book (and when I have her do the book reports) she doesn't seem to write any more than she thinks is necessary. I'll re-read what, she wrote, to her and then I'll add to it for her to show her how much more she could write to make it more interesting. The next time she writes it's the same she doesn't add any more to her writing. I think I need a way to help her see that when she writes she can add to it to make it better.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 What do you want from her?  What subjects do you give her to write?  What's her favorite subject?


 

coala
by Silver Member on Feb. 5, 2013 at 11:17 AM

Read her drafts and make comments asking questions.....like how did this happen, who did that and other things like that.  My comp professor did that for me and it helped me expand my writting.  She may just be one of those that gets right to the point (that is me).  I don't do well at describing or filling with "fluff".  Some people are like this.  I hope you find something that works.  I am still trying to teach my 1st grader that a "complete" sentence has more than 2 words...at least how she is writting them.

blueyedbaker
by on Feb. 6, 2013 at 12:39 PM

That's a good idea.

I think for her just thinking about all the drafts she has to do, all that writing makes her crabby and not want to even start so then she writes what ever comes to mind, she is trying to get it done fast. If she'd take her time and write it the right way and be descriptive when she has to then it wouldn't be so bad. I think it will just take her more time. I have to say that when she does put her mind to it she is very creative and can actually wirte. 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 I had my 9th graders picture a paragraph like a double cheeseburger. There's the bun which is the topic sentence and the conclusion, the (at least) 2 pieces of cheese and the 2 pieces of meat that make up the main ideas of the paragraph...but then there needs to be the veggies and condiments, the details that support each of the ideas.  

I would have her practice writing as rewriting.  Explain that the final draft needs to be a completed burger.  The first draft is a "down draft" where you just get it down.  In the second draft you make sure there is enough "meat" to explain yourself.  In the third draft you add the condiments (either some supporting details or for more descriptive writing that's when you add the adjectives and adverbs.

That method usually rounded out their writing in a way that bumped up description in their creative writing pieces or clarified their summaries and essays. 

Quoting blueyedbaker:

She has a writing skills book and she has a bunch of parts she has to do different writing skills. In that book (and when I have her do the book reports) she doesn't seem to write any more than she thinks is necessary. I'll re-read what, she wrote, to her and then I'll add to it for her to show her how much more she could write to make it more interesting. The next time she writes it's the same she doesn't add any more to her writing. I think I need a way to help her see that when she writes she can add to it to make it better.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 What do you want from her?  What subjects do you give her to write?  What's her favorite subject?


 


blueyedbaker
by on Feb. 6, 2013 at 12:52 PM

We re-read her first draft then fill in parts that need help. When she gets to use the computer to research the subject, that helps her a lot and she seems to do more once she's done researching. I have to remember to let her use the computer when she has to write about subjects that are hard for her.

Quoting coala:

Read her drafts and make comments asking questions.....like how did this happen, who did that and other things like that.  My comp professor did that for me and it helped me expand my writting.  She may just be one of those that gets right to the point (that is me).  I don't do well at describing or filling with "fluff".  Some people are like this.  I hope you find something that works.  I am still trying to teach my 1st grader that a "complete" sentence has more than 2 words...at least how she is writting them.


bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Feb. 6, 2013 at 1:32 PM

 My son is the same way.  He hates to put pen to paper.  He comes up with these great, long descriptive pieces, but then he just doesn't want to write it down.  He takes shortcuts and wants to get done fast.  Giving him a rubric of exactly what I'm looking for is very helpful with that.  If she knows at the beginning what she'll be "graded" on it may help her to overcome some of that tendancy to just write it.

Quoting blueyedbaker:

That's a good idea.

I think for her just thinking about all the drafts she has to do, all that writing makes her crabby and not want to even start so then she writes what ever comes to mind, she is trying to get it done fast. If she'd take her time and write it the right way and be descriptive when she has to then it wouldn't be so bad. I think it will just take her more time. I have to say that when she does put her mind to it she is very creative and can actually wirte. 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 I had my 9th graders picture a paragraph like a double cheeseburger. There's the bun which is the topic sentence and the conclusion, the (at least) 2 pieces of cheese and the 2 pieces of meat that make up the main ideas of the paragraph...but then there needs to be the veggies and condiments, the details that support each of the ideas.  

I would have her practice writing as rewriting.  Explain that the final draft needs to be a completed burger.  The first draft is a "down draft" where you just get it down.  In the second draft you make sure there is enough "meat" to explain yourself.  In the third draft you add the condiments (either some supporting details or for more descriptive writing that's when you add the adjectives and adverbs.

That method usually rounded out their writing in a way that bumped up description in their creative writing pieces or clarified their summaries and essays. 

Quoting blueyedbaker:

She has a writing skills book and she has a bunch of parts she has to do different writing skills. In that book (and when I have her do the book reports) she doesn't seem to write any more than she thinks is necessary. I'll re-read what, she wrote, to her and then I'll add to it for her to show her how much more she could write to make it more interesting. The next time she writes it's the same she doesn't add any more to her writing. I think I need a way to help her see that when she writes she can add to it to make it better.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 What do you want from her?  What subjects do you give her to write?  What's her favorite subject?


 


 

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