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Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

What was the reason you decide on homeschooling?

My son and I are very new to this homeschooling, like two days worth. He was enrolled in public school and older children were bullying him. He's in the first grade and these children were in the 3rd grade. I complained to the BOE and it seemed to have no affect on them. My son was crying and holding on to dear life as soon as we arrived to the school. I couldn't take it no more and that's when I decided to homeschool. I went to the BOE and talked to the attendence director. She tried to sway my decision by stating "first and second grade are crucial". I thought to myself "yeah so you want me to feed my child to the pack of wolves unprotected, I think not" After filing the notice of intent to homeschool, I'm free from the BOE.

So I was wondering, what was your reason you decide to homeschool?

by on Feb. 9, 2013 at 9:31 PM
Replies (21-30):
chlippr77
by Member on Feb. 11, 2013 at 7:54 AM
I had wanted to hs from the beginning, but DH wanted PS (actually wanted the same school district we graduated from). We lived in a very small school district and we were happy for the most part for the first few years. Then our second child started school. Our oldest DD is the kind of child who quickly absorbs EVERYTHING, DS is very much not like that. He had the same preK teacher, and when I expressed concern about what he wasn't grasping, she said, "Oh, well you can always hold him back next year." It all went downhill from there. I had to go over his teacher's head to have him evaluated for special services. Once that happened, the spec ed. coordinator actually told me, "If you would put him on SoonerCare {medicaid} we would work with him." Why would we do that when we had insurance and didn't need medicaid? The following year, he did well in K, but that same teacher had our twin DDs. She constantly complained about them, refused to work with their disabilities (they both have significant neurological delays as well as other issues). We got through PreK, and went to the IEP meeting for the twins in September, where we were told they would not be working with them (special services) because they had decided that they would be repeating K. They gave up on the twins in September. Even after all this DH wanted to keep them in PS. Then we had problems with the principle being a bully to the children and trying to intimidate us. We went to the superintendent, and he assured us things were going to change. We said we would leave the kids in school as long as we felt they were safe, and he promised to protect them. In April, the school board had had enough with the principle. The weekend they terminated her, she personally attacked our family. She coached our daughter (the most easily coached twin) and then called DHS saying we had abused her. The case worker came to our home, with the chief of police (who kept apologizing and saying it was ridiculous that they were even there). While she was there my little girl said, "Mommy, you slap me around." I said, "I do not!" Then my daughter said, "I know, but Ms. {Principle} told me to say that when somebody came to our house with the police. Now I get a special prize when I go back to school." Needless to say, DHS completely cleared us and apologized for even coming. After that, DH said they were never going back to that school. We were able to transfer our oldest DD to a nearby town (the school system we had both gone to our whole life), but after the two months she was there, we agreed the best choice for our children's education is for them to stay home.
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oredeb
by on Feb. 11, 2013 at 9:47 AM

 hi elisabeth!!

well it started out(years ago) i didnt like the bullying i saw in the ps going on, but the last 20 years or so its been because i just love teaching kids!

Boobah
by Nikki :) on Feb. 11, 2013 at 10:41 AM
Really bad public kindergarten experience
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Pukalani79
by Kristin on Feb. 11, 2013 at 12:29 PM

 Medical reasons for my youngest two, bullying for my oldest

impmprd
by on Feb. 11, 2013 at 12:59 PM
1 mom liked this

The public schools system was squashing my brilliant child's mind and spirit.  They labeled him as a problem child, his performance dropped and he was being punished for naturally reacting to their structure.  PS just can't do as well as I can in creating a fun, and open learning environment.  Stick with it, and don't fall into the trap thinking that you need to have any of the same curriculum or structure of the PS.  There are tons of free resources online.  A great book to read is "the Child Whisperer" by Carol Tuttle, it isn't abou education, it's about learning how to honor your child's natural abilities and strengths.   It is amazing!!!

Knightquester
by Bronze Member on Feb. 11, 2013 at 1:48 PM

It started as circumstantially.  Our school was 5-6 miles away with no bus services and my husband landed a job almost an hour away where he needed our only vehicle to commute to/from work.  We couldn't afford to move at that time, so we decided to try homeschooling for a year.  Since then my children have asked to continue each year when I've given them the option to homeschool or go back to public school.  We've moved closer to a nicer school district and although they have a lot of public school friends they get together with on a weekly (sometimes daily) basis they still prefer to stick with homeschooling.

I have asked them why and their answers vary.

My eldest doesn't learn math the way it's taught in schools, so she liked the fact she could learn the way she does best instead of struggling in school and being taught by me when she got home.

My second child likes that she can work ahead.  She was bored in school and is able to work several grade levels past her eldest sister.  She enjoys learning and enjoys even more the fact she can pick up a subject she has an interest in.

My third is dyslexic but you wouldn't know it because I've worked hard with her.  She enjoys the fact she can concentrate at the speed and way she needs to in order to meet and exceed what's for her grade.

My youngest who is the only one that has never attended public school, has never wanted to.  I finally got out of him that the idea of sitting at a desk all day doing school work and being made to stay there even if you get everything done doesn't sound appealing to him.  He, like his second eldest sister, is several grade levels ahead of his peers and prefers to lay on his stomach with his books in front of him, get his work done and then head off to do what he enjoys doing.

NoShame116
by on Feb. 11, 2013 at 3:54 PM
1 mom liked this
I'm tired of fighting with teachers that won't follow IEPs and 504s. And one son is ADHD and one just ADD. I will be starting this Fall, wish I could start sooner with my 11 year old ds.
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Kerseygeek
by Member on Feb. 11, 2013 at 7:34 PM
We always worked with our son on educational things & even did workbooks for kindergarten a year early. When he was suppose to start kindergarten we were thinking of homeschooling but not too seriously. My DH was more for it than me. He tested a year ahead to first grade so we decided we should homeschool him then.
Kerseygeek
by Member on Feb. 11, 2013 at 7:39 PM
Quoting Knightquester:

It started as circumstantially.  Our school was 5-6 miles away with no bus services and my husband landed a job almost an hour away where he needed our only vehicle to commute to/from work.  We couldn't afford to move at that time, so we decided to try homeschooling for a year.  Since then my children have asked to continue each year when I've given them the option to homeschool or go back to public school.  We've moved closer to a nicer school district and although they have a lot of public school friends they get together with on a weekly (sometimes daily) basis they still prefer to stick with homeschooling.

I have asked them why and their answers vary.

My eldest doesn't learn math the way it's taught in schools, so she liked the fact she could learn the way she does best instead of struggling in school and being taught by me when she got home.

My second child likes that she can work ahead.  She was bored in school and is able to work several grade levels past her eldest sister.  She enjoys learning and enjoys even more the fact she can pick up a subject she has an interest in.

My third is dyslexic but you wouldn't know it because I've worked hard with her.  She enjoys the fact she can concentrate at the speed and way she needs to in order to meet and exceed what's for her grade.

My youngest who is the only one that has never attended public school, has never wanted to.  I finally got out of him that the idea of sitting at a desk all day doing school work and being made to stay there even if you get everything done doesn't sound appealing to him.  He, like his second eldest sister, is several grade levels ahead of his peers and prefers to lay on his stomach with his books in front of him, get his work done and then head off to do what he enjoys doing.





I believe my son would excel the way yours do but we are in a rut & I was wondering what kind of schooling/curriculum you do that works so well with gifted kids?
Knightquester
by Bronze Member on Feb. 11, 2013 at 9:03 PM

I don't consider my advanced learners to be "gifted" rather just capable at working at a faster pace than the children of mine that aren't, so I don't do anything special with them except allow them to move further if they show they are competent in that level.

Math:  Scotts Foresman California Mathematics for my two younger ones and Pearsons Algebra for my two older ones.  I've found with exception to my eldest that can struggle with math any other math is too repetitious.  The other three pick up concepts quickly and are able to retain things easily.  I also don't teach to the book, meaning that the books examples aren't what I always use since I can explain concepts easier to where they can get things quicker.  I used to tutor college math.

Grammar: Growing with Grammar.

Writing: I have them do reports, expository, narratives, argumentative and other such writing assignments based on something I come up with.

Reading: They read all the time in school and on their personal time.  They can tell you every detail of a book no matter how thick it is and how much content it has, and they can summarize well too so it's not a subject I really push.

Science:  Science Fusion for all of them and Science in a Nutshell kits for my two younger ones as well.  Also my eldest two are taking middle/high school chemistry through a homeschool program.

History:  History Odyssey and also I give them reading assignments and reports to write, so I add more to what is placed in this curriculum.  For my youngest I feel the material lacks so much so I make my own worksheets based off of what he's working on and print them up for him to supplement.

Geography:  I don't use any set curriculum for this subject but I do have a variety of workbooks and assignments for World and United States Geography I toss to them each month.

Computers: Programming in VB this year; Javascript or C# next year.

Foreign Language: They attend a half day of Japanese classes at a local Japanese school on Saturdays where they learn to read,  write, and speak Japanese.

P.E.: Tennis

Extra Curricular: Carpentry

I'm not sure if I missed anything... I don't tend to type up what the kids are working on.  They do well in their work and test well in the state tests.  The most important thing is they enjoy learning to where it's not something they consider a chore.

Quoting Kerseygeek:
I believe my son would excel the way yours do but we are in a rut & I was wondering what kind of schooling/curriculum you do that works so well with gifted kids?
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