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speech?

Posted by on Feb. 11, 2013 at 1:46 AM
  • 10 Replies

My four-year old failed her hearing test (in one ear) at birth. By the time she was 1, she was passing her hearing tests, but my hubby and I have always wondered if maybe she was still having a hard time hearing. I know all kids develop differently, and her older sister was definitely an early talker (full sentences and grammatically correct short stories before 2 that even strangers could understand with ease). But...she turned four a few weeks ago and I'm starting to wonder how much of her speech is normal for her age and what might be a sign she's having troubles hearing. I have talked to her doc, but he's not much help.

She says a hard 'g' sound instead of 'd' most of the time, and drops her 'd' at the start of some words. 'Doggy' is 'goggy', 'daddy' is 'naddy' or 'laddy'...sometimes 'taddy', 'don't is 'gon't' and so on.

She doesn't say 'w' instead of 'r', she just kind of drops it all together if the 'r' is in the middle of a word 'serious becomes seious, 'alright' becomes 'aight', 'store' becomes 'sto', 'garage' becomes 'gahge'.

She can pronounce all of the other letter sounds normally, which is why her doctor isn't concerned. However, no one except her siblings, her dad and I can understand her when she talks right away. Strangers and our extended family ask her to repeat herself a few times, but after three or four tries, they look to me for an interpretation. She speaks in complete sentences, uses proper tenses and everything, she's just not understandable.

I'm working with her at home, but I feel like I'm not doing the best job I could be. I was hoping you guys would have some advice for me on steps I should take next, resources I could use, or if this is just normal and I'm worrying about nothing. Thanks much :)

by on Feb. 11, 2013 at 1:46 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Rust.n.Gears
by on Feb. 11, 2013 at 6:56 AM
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My son is speech delayed due to autism and speech apraxia. I tried to educate him at home but I felt he needed more. I finally ended up asking the pediatrician for a speech therapist. It is working well for us. We just have to jump through hoops because the insurance company wants him in a special needs pre-school which we will not do.

Malley
by on Feb. 11, 2013 at 7:35 AM
1 mom liked this
Look up speech development to see which sounds come in at each age. I wouldn't be as worried about "r" at her age, but I think "d" comes in at 3. My 5 year old has a severe speech delay and I was worried about my 2 year old too. The speech therapist told me not to worry because he wasn't expected to make certain sounds yet. My 2 year old says " cog" for "dog" too.
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romacox
by Silver Member on Feb. 11, 2013 at 8:12 AM

It is interesting that mothers have an intuitive sense when it comes to their children. 

Hearing conditions such As “Cookie Bites“
This one I experience myself, and it is very often undiagnosed until late in life (for me t was in my 30‘s). Hearing specialists can test for this condition, and prescribe digital hearing aids to help. Allow me to describe this condition for you.

Children with this condition will be able to hear some sounds very well, and others not so well. For example: I hear Rs, and Gs. However F, and S sound just alike to me unless I am able to read your lips. These children become very proficient at reading lips, and logically filling in missing sounds and words. As a result parents often never realize that it is an actual hearing loss.

        º You will find these children seem to follow instructions better when they are looking at you then they do when not able to see your face.
        º They will also commonly mispronounce words causing them to be poor spellers, and poor at decoding phonic sounds to form words (they often pronounce phonic sounds incorrectly).
        º Tip: when teaching these children their phonic sounds, be sure they are able to look directly at your lips.

My children say they thought I was ignoring them when they said Mom. The truth was, I did not hear the Ms…I only heard short vowel o.

If this is what your daughter has, you will need to take extra care to make sure she is pronouncing the phonic sounds correctly. 

motheroffour186
by Bronze Member on Feb. 11, 2013 at 9:30 AM

I am so sorry with my little girl we just started teaching her sign language.

www.lifeprint.com
aslpro.com

www.ehow.com/how_4823087_learn-sign-​language.html

Boobah
by Nikki :) on Feb. 11, 2013 at 10:45 AM
1 mom liked this
Here is a bump :)
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kttycat84
by Bonnie on Feb. 11, 2013 at 1:58 PM
2 moms liked this

This does kind of sound like her. I notice she gets a much closer pronunciation during a certain exercise I do with her. I have her look at my mouth and we say a word VERY slowly, exaggerating the facial movements that go with the word. And, she's great about following directions, but...if you call her name and she's not looking at you, you have to say "Jasmine" kind of loudly. If you just say "Jas" she may respond, but it's kind of iffy. It sounds like maybe I should take her back to the doc and see if we can get a referral for another hearing test.

Quoting romacox:

It is interesting that mothers have an intuitive sense when it comes to their children. 

Hearing conditions such As “Cookie Bites“
This one I experience myself, and it is very often undiagnosed until late in life (for me t was in my 30‘s). Hearing specialists can test for this condition, and prescribe digital hearing aids to help. Allow me to describe this condition for you.

Children with this condition will be able to hear some sounds very well, and others not so well. For example: I hear Rs, and Gs. However F, and S sound just alike to me unless I am able to read your lips. These children become very proficient at reading lips, and logically filling in missing sounds and words. As a result parents often never realize that it is an actual hearing loss.

        º You will find these children seem to follow instructions better when they are looking at you then they do when not able to see your face.
        º They will also commonly mispronounce words causing them to be poor spellers, and poor at decoding phonic sounds to form words (they often pronounce phonic sounds incorrectly).
        º Tip: when teaching these children their phonic sounds, be sure they are able to look directly at your lips.

My children say they thought I was ignoring them when they said Mom. The truth was, I did not hear the Ms…I only heard short vowel o.

If this is what your daughter has, you will need to take extra care to make sure she is pronouncing the phonic sounds correctly. 


kttycat84
by Bonnie on Feb. 11, 2013 at 1:59 PM

Thanks. We did baby signs, but I think this might help a lot. :)

Quoting motheroffour186:

I am so sorry with my little girl we just started teaching her sign language.

www.lifeprint.com
aslpro.com

www.ehow.com/how_4823087_learn-sign-​language.html


usmom3
by BJ on Feb. 11, 2013 at 2:57 PM

 I have read that people with heavy accents are finding it hard to teach their children proper speech because the child is learning to speak from  hearing the adults around them talking. Not saying this is the case with your daughter just letting you know that that could be hindering her even more if there are people with accents around her all the time.

kttycat84
by Bonnie on Feb. 11, 2013 at 3:23 PM

That's a really interesting thought. Hubs and I both have a Michigan accent, but of course we don't notice it. They play with some neighbor kids, but not often and I haven't really noticed many accents. I think all the kids around here move too often to really develop an accent (military housing).

Quoting usmom3:

 I have read that people with heavy accents are finding it hard to teach their children proper speech because the child is learning to speak from  hearing the adults around them talking. Not saying this is the case with your daughter just letting you know that that could be hindering her even more if there are people with accents around her all the time.


kirbymom
by Sonja on Feb. 11, 2013 at 4:41 PM
1 mom liked this

Hi kttycat. :)

Sounds to me like your daughter just isn't focusing on sounds and along with those sounds, words. I was sort of the same way as your daughter.  I was what was called back in the day, a lazy listener. It would probably be a wise decision to get a second opinion, especially if you feel lilke there truly is somiething not quite right. 

 What I did to teach my children how to say a word when they were all little was tell them to look at my mouth and I also pointed right to my mouth. Then, I would carefully pronounce the word they were learning. I would have them repeat the word back to me. Now if they didn't say the word quite right, I would repeat the above a couple of times. Ususally the kids seemed to be able to say it after a few times. Sometimes though, it took several attempts before they would learn the word.  If they were having a particular time then I would go over it with them once or twice and then drop it and move on to something else and come back to it later.  But always making sure they were looking at my mouth. I made sure I was point right on my chin as close to my lips as possible.  

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