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Do you get worried if they aren't at grade level?

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Do you ever get worried if your children get behind and aren't at grade level...even a little bitty bit of concern?  I know many of us homeschoolers don't go by "grade level", but follow our child's ability and pace.  However, I have to admit that sometimes I get a little concerned....and I have no idea what I'm even concerned about because we are under an umbrella school, so no tests, state standards, evaluations, etc!  My 6 year old would technically be in 1st grade if her were in school, but he's more at a mid-Kindergarten level.  I know he'll be fine, but I was just wondering if I'm the only one who lives by the "no grade level" theory, but still gets worried at times. 

by on Feb. 12, 2013 at 1:51 PM
Replies (21-30):
bren_darlene
by Bronze Member on Feb. 14, 2013 at 11:26 AM
1 mom liked this


 Agree.  I had one that was around 11 before he began to really read.  He was smart as a whip but just wasn't ready to read.  He could remember every single cows # on the ranch we worked on and remember each ones due date but just wasn't interested in reading. When he was ready he took off and loved reading.  It all comes out in the wash so to speak. That particular kid is almost 24 and is doing fine :-)

Quoting Leissaintexas:

I had one that didn't read till he was nearly 10. So no, I'm not a big stickler for "grade levels". They've got their whole lives to learn, I'm not going to try to cram it all in inside someone elses time table.



 I am a stay at home,  home educating, non-vaxingmother to many children :)  And a very happy wife to a wonderful man!!!

usmom3
by BJ on Feb. 14, 2013 at 12:11 PM
Can you find out ahead of time what is going to be on the entire test? If yes I would get creative with what you do including the things that they would need to know for the test. For example the protractor, I would buy one & let her play with it a little, look up what kind of fun activity you could do with it. Here is a link that might help with the protracted problem http://www.mathsisfun.com/geometry/protractor-using.html
I hope this helps, you might also see if there is an unschool group in your aria because I know there are people in NY that unschool.


Quoting blueyedbaker:

So what do I do when I have to take my kids in for the state test (we're in NY) and if they do horrible I'm the one that will get "in trouble" Parts of the test we might not have chose to study but yet it's on the state test which she has to take and if she doesn't know it then she doesn't get it right. What are people suppose to do about that? 

I think my girls are very smart and we going by a lot of what the PS is doing but still we might not cover some of it. I was looking at the old ELA and Math state test and there was a couple of questions she will have to use a protractor, I don't even have a protractor, nothing has come up in our Math book yet about it! I want her prepared for the test but yet I don't want to focus on it. 

I want to kick the PS thinking way but it's hard when my girls will still have to take their test.

Quoting usmom3:

 I used to worry about that stuff when I was more of the school mind but I have read a lot & learned that the arbitrary rules that the public school would have us believe is the way we all are supposed to learn is a lie.  Children can learn to read from as young as 2 or 3 to as old as 12 or 13 & learning writing & math has the same braud range. Every child is different & no one learners anything at the same age as others, even if they are in the school system they still learn at there own pace & if they are "behind" per the school standards they get labeled slow when in fact they are right on track for themselves.


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blueyedbaker
by on Feb. 14, 2013 at 12:19 PM

Thanks, you always have great ideas!

My 10 year old has taken the ELA every year so far even though the head of curriculum told me she didn't have to. Since she did so good in second grade of PS she didn't have to take the test for 3rd grade, then 4th came and she told me she didn't have to again but I told her I wanted her to take them both times and she aced them but still I'm finding that each year we are getting farther away from PS thinking and the work they do that I don't want her to score bad on the test because she didn't learn what they did at that point.

Quoting usmom3:

Can you find out ahead of time what is going to be on the entire test? If yes I would get creative with what you do including the things that they would need to know for the test. For example the protractor, I would buy one & let her play with it a little, look up what kind of fun activity you could do with it. Here is a link that might help with the protracted problem http://www.mathsisfun.com/geometry/protractor-using.html
I hope this helps, you might also see if there is an unschool group in your aria because I know there are people in NY that unschool.


Quoting blueyedbaker:

So what do I do when I have to take my kids in for the state test (we're in NY) and if they do horrible I'm the one that will get "in trouble" Parts of the test we might not have chose to study but yet it's on the state test which she has to take and if she doesn't know it then she doesn't get it right. What are people suppose to do about that? 

I think my girls are very smart and we going by a lot of what the PS is doing but still we might not cover some of it. I was looking at the old ELA and Math state test and there was a couple of questions she will have to use a protractor, I don't even have a protractor, nothing has come up in our Math book yet about it! I want her prepared for the test but yet I don't want to focus on it. 

I want to kick the PS thinking way but it's hard when my girls will still have to take their test.

Quoting usmom3:

 I used to worry about that stuff when I was more of the school mind but I have read a lot & learned that the arbitrary rules that the public school would have us believe is the way we all are supposed to learn is a lie.  Children can learn to read from as young as 2 or 3 to as old as 12 or 13 & learning writing & math has the same braud range. Every child is different & no one learners anything at the same age as others, even if they are in the school system they still learn at there own pace & if they are "behind" per the school standards they get labeled slow when in fact they are right on track for themselves.



usmom3
by BJ on Feb. 14, 2013 at 12:38 PM
Your welcome, it makes me happy to see that my ideas help other & that they are appreciated.

Quoting blueyedbaker:

Thanks, you always have great ideas!

My 10 year old has taken the ELA every year so far even though the head of curriculum told me she didn't have to. Since she did so good in second grade of PS she didn't have to take the test for 3rd grade, then 4th came and she told me she didn't have to again but I told her I wanted her to take them both times and she aced them but still I'm finding that each year we are getting farther away from PS thinking and the work they do that I don't want her to score bad on the test because she didn't learn what they did at that point.

Quoting usmom3:

Can you find out ahead of time what is going to be on the entire test? If yes I would get creative with what you do including the things that they would need to know for the test. For example the protractor, I would buy one & let her play with it a little, look up what kind of fun activity you could do with it. Here is a link that might help with the protracted problem http://www.mathsisfun.com/geometry/protractor-using.html

I hope this helps, you might also see if there is an unschool group in your aria because I know there are people in NY that unschool.




Quoting blueyedbaker:

So what do I do when I have to take my kids in for the state test (we're in NY) and if they do horrible I'm the one that will get "in trouble" Parts of the test we might not have chose to study but yet it's on the state test which she has to take and if she doesn't know it then she doesn't get it right. What are people suppose to do about that? 

I think my girls are very smart and we going by a lot of what the PS is doing but still we might not cover some of it. I was looking at the old ELA and Math state test and there was a couple of questions she will have to use a protractor, I don't even have a protractor, nothing has come up in our Math book yet about it! I want her prepared for the test but yet I don't want to focus on it. 

I want to kick the PS thinking way but it's hard when my girls will still have to take their test.

Quoting usmom3:

 I used to worry about that stuff when I was more of the school mind but I have read a lot & learned that the arbitrary rules that the public school would have us believe is the way we all are supposed to learn is a lie.  Children can learn to read from as young as 2 or 3 to as old as 12 or 13 & learning writing & math has the same braud range. Every child is different & no one learners anything at the same age as others, even if they are in the school system they still learn at there own pace & if they are "behind" per the school standards they get labeled slow when in fact they are right on track for themselves.



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1Redapple
by on Feb. 14, 2013 at 3:37 PM

No,

mem82
by Platinum Member on Feb. 14, 2013 at 3:41 PM

Reading is the only thing that I worry about. I know *in my brain* that some kids just learn later, but I can't seem to stop freaking out about it.

Quoting bren_darlene:


 Agree.  I had one that was around 11 before he began to really read.  He was smart as a whip but just wasn't ready to read.  He could remember every single cows # on the ranch we worked on and remember each ones due date but just wasn't interested in reading. When he was ready he took off and loved reading.  It all comes out in the wash so to speak. That particular kid is almost 24 and is doing fine :-)

Quoting Leissaintexas:

I had one that didn't read till he was nearly 10. So no, I'm not a big stickler for "grade levels". They've got their whole lives to learn, I'm not going to try to cram it all in inside someone elses time table.




twyliatepeka
by Bronze Member on Feb. 14, 2013 at 3:55 PM
I try to make sure she can keep up since I have a lot of skeptical family members. Dd is 5 & in on a K level in some things & a 1st grade level on others & pushing 2nd in a couple. She is fine for her age group. If I saw she was severely behind we would push those areas.
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snazzylady1
by Member on Feb. 14, 2013 at 10:56 PM
1 mom liked this

I wouldn't be too concerned with grade level since your homeschooling.  The reason why it is such an issue with public as well as priviate schools is because you are teaching a larger number of students at one time.  In a public school it is usually on average 23 students to 1 teacher.  So therefore, students have to move at a certain pace in order to keep up.  Your 6 year old has an advantage because you can teach at his level.  It gives you an opportunity to focus on his weaknesess for longer periods of time than he might have in a setting with many other students.  Your right your 6 yr old doesn't have to worry about testing, state standards and all the other things associated with our educational system.  Your 6yr old will be fine. 

Tonya Simmons

smartandsnazzykids.com

awilliams77
by on Feb. 15, 2013 at 1:15 AM


Me too! My oldest, in fact. It was a bit scary at the time, homeschooling a non-reader. She graduates from USC with a BA in Psychology this May.

i didn't really worry about grade level once her reading took off at age 11. As in, reading Eragon!

Quoting Leissaintexas:

I had one that didn't read till he was nearly 10. So no, I'm not a big stickler for "grade levels". They've got their whole lives to learn, I'm not going to try to cram it all in inside someone elses time table.



MaraJade27
by on Feb. 15, 2013 at 10:02 AM

I struggle with this a lot. One of the goals we have for home schooling is to get them AHEAD of grade level. It's our first year and they're still so far behind from the terrible public school they were in. I'm being patient, but I'd really like to see them find at least ONE subject they excel at.

I would imagine this is a normal feeling for many people starting out with HS.

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