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If you taught handwriting to a lefty, were they reluctant writers? I'm on my second lefty and they both had such difficulties. Not wanting to write, writing letters backwards or laying down.
My righty picked it up super fast and beautifully. Just wondering if the dominant hand matters? Or is it my stubborn child who fights me in everything, so why would I think handwriting would be different? ;)
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
by on Feb. 25, 2013 at 8:46 AM
Replies (11-17):
LoriSQ
by on Mar. 1, 2013 at 7:22 PM

My lefty son (almost 5 years old) doesn't seem to have any problems with writing letters backwards, etc. 

JTE11
by Member on Mar. 1, 2013 at 9:37 PM

I don't know, but lefties have to push their words from left to right and righties have to pull them and that sometimes causes difficulties even if you tilt the paper the other way. My brother was always super stubborn about it and he's a lefty so I don't know if it's just his personality or if lefties are just super stubborn! We have a lot of 'interesting' lefties in our family. He was stubborn about everything, though so handwriting was no different.

Mrs._Lovett
by on Mar. 1, 2013 at 11:37 PM
i am a lefty and im always told how beautiful my handwriting is. i do get pen/pencil all over my hand but it has never bothered me. i am very creative and artistic as someone else mentioned. ive been told that im stubborn. when i was young i used to write my name with backwards letters and from right to left. i remember writing it that way on the name plate of a toy doctor kit. i don't know what changed to make me write correctly but if its any consolation i adore writing and have for as long as i can remember.
TroyboysMom
by on Mar. 3, 2013 at 6:06 AM

It's not the dominant hand that matters (this is coming from a lefty), it's trying to mirror what a righty is doing. Try writing letters correctly when your first inclination (and it's a strong inclination) is to form them backwards. Orientation is tough to grasp. If possible, try to show her sitting opposite her, versus alongside or over her. Or, see if you can find some left handed resources? 

I have beautiful penmanship now (I have done wedding invitations professionally in the past), but it wasn't without a ton of hard work, and a grandfather who realized that was the problem, and worked with me to correct it (bless his right-handed, stubborn heart.). 

PP had it correctly, encourage her to turn the paper to an angle that feels "good," and let her work it out. 

Boobah
by Nikki :) on Mar. 3, 2013 at 7:07 AM
I always write with my left hand when we do things together. Do you think that is helpful or just more confusing since I probably don't write the same way a lefty would?

Quoting TroyboysMom:

It's not the dominant hand that matters (this is coming from a lefty), it's trying to mirror what a righty is doing. Try writing letters correctly when your first inclination (and it's a strong inclination) is to form them backwards. Orientation is tough to grasp. If possible, try to show her sitting opposite her, versus alongside or over her. Or, see if you can find some left handed resources? 

I have beautiful penmanship now (I have done wedding invitations professionally in the past), but it wasn't without a ton of hard work, and a grandfather who realized that was the problem, and worked with me to correct it (bless his right-handed, stubborn heart.). 

PP had it correctly, encourage her to turn the paper to an angle that feels "good," and let her work it out. 

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
TroyboysMom
by on Mar. 3, 2013 at 7:01 PM
1 mom liked this

If you're writing with your left hand, chances are your handwriting is awkward, and so that's what she's seeing. Show her your true hand movements, your true handshapes - that is going to be what she picks up on. Writing is a difficult accomplishment for lefties. If you feel it wouldn't be demeaning, you may want to move back to a ziploc bag full of hair gel, and have her write the letters on the surface of the bag with her finger. Once she's made legible, correct letter shapes on the bag, then move her to paper. Or shaving cream on a cookie sheet, fingerpainting with hair gel on a sliding glass door - there are all kinds of ways to have her get used to writing with her left hand, and those ways will translate to her penmanship.

Channell07
by Member on Mar. 3, 2013 at 8:44 PM

DD is a lefty and isn't really wanting to write most days either!

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