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I need some advice re: Classical Education

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I am just beyond worn out mentally. I made a decision to go Classical next year and now I am really really re-thinking it. I question why Latin, a dead language, is important. I wonder if recitation and memorization too closely mimics the teaching to the test we see in public schools? Is it silly to focus so much on history in 1st through 4th. Is it better to start closer to home with US History and Geography than to hit Ancient Egypt at ages 5 and 6? MOST IMPORTANTLY..... IS CLASSICAL AN ENJOYABLE LEARNING EXPERIENCE??????







What are your HONEST thoughts?
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by on Feb. 26, 2013 at 1:03 PM
Replies (11-20):
Ruthmom802
by on Feb. 26, 2013 at 9:46 PM
1 mom liked this

 The closest I get to Classical is Charlotte Mason... I'm not keen on classical. I do like Charlotte Mason and Whole Books. But, the classical doesn't really hit me as interesting. But, I have a very active boy. I think the classical goes better with girls... but that's just my opinion. I've read about several techniques... I prefer Whole Books and some Charlotte Mason, but I don't strictly stick to them. 

If you're still not sold on the Classical approach, then research more and find what fits you and your kids best. Good luck!

CJsMommy040506
by on Feb. 26, 2013 at 9:56 PM

I'm so glad you posted this since I'm wondering the same thing. I'm not yet homeschooling, will be next year with my K and second grader. I find the classical approach to history very intriguing, in fact I can't wait to learn it with them. However, I'm thinking they may be too young, especially my daughter. I want to combine history and science for them and I really feel like she (the one in K) needs to learn continents, basic facts about the US and for my second grader, he needs a little more on the US. I know he'd be interested in things like mummies, gladiators in ancient rome, etc. I like the classical approach after a brief overview of American history. For this coming year my plan as of right now is Elemental History which is US history, covering states, wars, and important people. We'll do some geography with a book I found on Amazon (A Childs Geography Explore His Earth) and the Evan Moor pocket books. If for some reason we finish history early (they love it) then we may start with History Odyssey late in the year. I put Story Of The World on hold at the library. I thought that I'd start reading to them and see if they find it interesting.

CJsMommy040506
by on Feb. 26, 2013 at 9:58 PM

 


Quoting Ruthmom802:

 The closest I get to Classical is Charlotte Mason... I'm not keen on classical. I do like Charlotte Mason and Whole Books. But, the classical doesn't really hit me as interesting. But, I have a very active boy. I think the classical goes better with girls... but that's just my opinion. I've read about several techniques... I prefer Whole Books and some Charlotte Mason, but I don't strictly stick to them. 

If you're still not sold on the Classical approach, then research more and find what fits you and your kids best. Good luck!


 I agree with this about girls and boys. While my son likes for me to read to him, I think reading as much as the classical approach requires wouldn't work well with him. My daughter (4 1/2) would sit and listen to me read all day.

JTE11
by on Feb. 26, 2013 at 10:20 PM

Yes, classical learning can be enjoyable. Latin is important because so many or our modern words are based in Latin and it can be fun to take current words and guess their meanings based on the Latin words you already know. It's like having a secret decoder ring for a lot of modern English.

Precious333
by Julia on Feb. 26, 2013 at 10:25 PM
My short reply.....maube i will pos more later. U love it and so do my boys! We do classical conversations and make it so enjoyable and fun! It really doesnt have to be dry and tge love latij too! Latin, even thoigh its dead, is rooted and will help with all the subjects learned. Part of the philosophy behind the classical method is that subjects are integrated.....latin is integrated with other sujbects.....they all connect!
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Precious333
by Julia on Feb. 26, 2013 at 10:28 PM
I have three active boys, ages 6, 4 and 2. My oldest has a personalityblike daddy who was diagnosed with adhd and ocd. Thet love wha u do with them and we use classical conversations (the classical method). My 2 yr old eveb participates. I d make it fun and active though....lots of songs, hand motions, movement abd games!


Quoting CJsMommy040506:

 




Quoting Ruthmom802:


 The closest I get to Classical is Charlotte Mason... I'm not keen on classical. I do like Charlotte Mason and Whole Books. But, the classical doesn't really hit me as interesting. But, I have a very active boy. I think the classical goes better with girls... but that's just my opinion. I've read about several techniques... I prefer Whole Books and some Charlotte Mason, but I don't strictly stick to them. 


If you're still not sold on the Classical approach, then research more and find what fits you and your kids best. Good luck!




 I agree with this about girls and boys. While my son likes for me to read to him, I think reading as much as the classical approach requires wouldn't work well with him. My daughter (4 1/2) would sit and listen to me read all day.


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Precious333
by Julia on Feb. 26, 2013 at 10:31 PM
I started mine a age four. We jus do bits and peices....spend a 4 hr period once a week and the res of the week is 30-1hr. The love it! We do classical.conversations, which we do memorization through songs, hand motions, voices, pictures, map tracing and thats it. We also have story of the world and mostly focus that with my 6 yr old, only one lesson a week.


Quoting CJsMommy040506:

I'm so glad you posted this since I'm wondering the same thing. I'm not yet homeschooling, will be next year with my K and second grader. I find the classical approach to history very intriguing, in fact I can't wait to learn it with them. However, I'm thinking they may be too young, especially my daughter. I want to combine history and science for them and I really feel like she (the one in K) needs to learn continents, basic facts about the US and for my second grader, he needs a little more on the US. I know he'd be interested in things like mummies, gladiators in ancient rome, etc. I like the classical approach after a brief overview of American history. For this coming year my plan as of right now is Elemental History which is US history, covering states, wars, and important people. We'll do some geography with a book I found on Amazon (A Childs Geography Explore His Earth) and the Evan Moor pocket books. If for some reason we finish history early (they love it) then we may start with History Odyssey late in the year. I put Story Of The World on hold at the library. I thought that I'd start reading to them and see if they find it interesting.


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Precious333
by Julia on Feb. 26, 2013 at 10:33 PM
I have a great article fof you i qill share later, its kind of long. I do eclectix too, however if you omit some things from the classical approach you miss something crucial.


Quoting romacox:

I use the Eclectic Method so that I can take the best of all the methods.  The  most important part about the Classical Approach is that it teaches analytical thinking.  That can be done without swallowing the whole package. 

Different Methods Used By Home Educators

Many home educators teach Latin because it helps with vocabulary and spelling. 


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Precious333
by Julia on Feb. 26, 2013 at 10:35 PM
We use classical conversations....the timeline cards are a great start!


Quoting Silverkitty:

Well, lets see.  Latin helps with grammar, and is the basis of many other languages, supposidly helps in learning them.  We are not learning latin though I've thought about it.  My daughter wants to learn Japanese so that has nothing to do with latin.  My son might want to learn spanish and we might start with latin then.

I don't do recitation, it doesn't work for us.  We discuss what was read or done, but I don't make her recite it.  No do we do memorization, if she wants to learn something and does memorize it, that is up to her.

History, I'm all confused on history.  I've used some classical education history, my daughter doesn't like reading from an encyclopedia, so we moved on to actual novels, both fiction and non-fiction.


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romacox
by Silver Member on Feb. 27, 2013 at 5:30 AM

I would love to read your article.  Do you have a link to it?


Quoting Precious333:

I have a great article fof you i qill share later, its kind of long. I do eclectix too, however if you omit some things from the classical approach you miss something crucial.


Quoting romacox:

I use the Eclectic Method so that I can take the best of all the methods.  The  most important part about the Classical Approach is that it teaches analytical thinking.  That can be done without swallowing the whole package. 

Different Methods Used By Home Educators

Many home educators teach Latin because it helps with vocabulary and spelling. 




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