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Common Core and Your Homeschool Curriculum (PIOG)

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Hi Ladies,

I just wanted to share this website with you. It was created by a homeschooling mom just this past week. She already has over 1100 likes on FB! She is researching all curriculum publishers in order to determine whether or not the publisher will be making changes in order to align with the Common Core Standards. If you are unfamiliar with the CCS, she also has many links to resources for further information.

http://www.theeducationalfreedomcoalition.org/

by on Mar. 16, 2013 at 3:45 PM
Replies (11-20):
mom2Bellarose
by Member on Mar. 18, 2013 at 1:15 AM
1 mom liked this

Thank you for posting this!

oredeb
by on Mar. 19, 2013 at 5:15 PM

 ok ,i forget, what is common core???

mem82
by Platinum Member on Mar. 19, 2013 at 5:36 PM
1 mom liked this

I use them as a tool to assess where my child is compared to the average child his age. They don't make it or break it for me. I just use them as vague guildline. If my child meets them or beats them, great. If they are a little behind, okay. If they are no where near understanding that, then i might assess if I am doing everything I need to do.

kttycat84
by on Mar. 19, 2013 at 5:41 PM

I know I'm the odd one out, but I don't think common core is a bad thing. I think it might actually help a lot of people, for instance, military families who move between states frequently. It can be hard on kids to go from doing advanced work in one public school's 5th grade to being behind in a different school's.

Personally, I use our state's common core standards as a measuring tool and a minimum. I like to make sure my kids are at least on par wtih those in ps, in case they or we decide to switch to ps later. Also, I like to have it there as a way to mark progress.

The common core standards aren't a particular teaching method or anything, they're just a baseline of what kids should be able to accomplish by the end of a certain grade...and that just kind of seems like common sense to me. No one says that you can't teach beyond them.

mem82
by Platinum Member on Mar. 19, 2013 at 5:44 PM
1 mom liked this

This, exactly. 8)

Quoting kttycat84:

I know I'm the odd one out, but I don't think common core is a bad thing. I think it might actually help a lot of people, for instance, military families who move between states frequently. It can be hard on kids to go from doing advanced work in one public school's 5th grade to being behind in a different school's.

Personally, I use our state's common core standards as a measuring tool and a minimum. I like to make sure my kids are at least on par wtih those in ps, in case they or we decide to switch to ps later. Also, I like to have it there as a way to mark progress.

The common core standards aren't a particular teaching method or anything, they're just a baseline of what kids should be able to accomplish by the end of a certain grade...and that just kind of seems like common sense to me. No one says that you can't teach beyond them.


bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Mar. 19, 2013 at 5:58 PM

 I think they could have been a good thing, but the "policy makers" relied on the biggest testing corporations and the biggest education publishing companies to come up with this brain child.  It has made it easier for the standardized testing companies to get a death grip on the market and opens a new market for "remediation" curriculum for McDougal Littel, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, and Houghton Mifflin (all of which had too much say IMO in creating tese standards to begin with.)  They could have created a good basis for scope and sequence, but they actually don't do that great of a job in that area.

Quoting kttycat84:

I know I'm the odd one out, but I don't think common core is a bad thing. I think it might actually help a lot of people, for instance, military families who move between states frequently. It can be hard on kids to go from doing advanced work in one public school's 5th grade to being behind in a different school's.

Personally, I use our state's common core standards as a measuring tool and a minimum. I like to make sure my kids are at least on par wtih those in ps, in case they or we decide to switch to ps later. Also, I like to have it there as a way to mark progress.

The common core standards aren't a particular teaching method or anything, they're just a baseline of what kids should be able to accomplish by the end of a certain grade...and that just kind of seems like common sense to me. No one says that you can't teach beyond them.

 

kttycat84
by on Mar. 19, 2013 at 6:36 PM

I read over the standards, and I honestly don't think they sound bad...if anything, I think they're a little lax. The goals they outline should be able to be accomplished by their respective grade levels without teachers or parents needing to hire tutors or put kids in slower classes. Sure, it's not going to be perfect for every single kid, but that's one of the reason we don't use ps ourselves, we want to tailor our kids' educations on an individual level. I think for people who rely on ps the standards are not only acceptable, but a very good thing. I know I'd feel relieved if my oldest were still in ps...it was so nerve-wracking moving from NC to CA and realizing that she would have been close to 2 years behind if we hadn't homeschooled for pre-k and k (we started her in ps this year, but pulled her out after 2 weeks).

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 I think they could have been a good thing, but the "policy makers" relied on the biggest testing corporations and the biggest education publishing companies to come up with this brain child.  It has made it easier for the standardized testing companies to get a death grip on the market and opens a new market for "remediation" curriculum for McDougal Littel, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, and Houghton Mifflin (all of which had too much say IMO in creating tese standards to begin with.)  They could have created a good basis for scope and sequence, but they actually don't do that great of a job in that area.

Quoting kttycat84:

I know I'm the odd one out, but I don't think common core is a bad thing. I think it might actually help a lot of people, for instance, military families who move between states frequently. It can be hard on kids to go from doing advanced work in one public school's 5th grade to being behind in a different school's.

Personally, I use our state's common core standards as a measuring tool and a minimum. I like to make sure my kids are at least on par wtih those in ps, in case they or we decide to switch to ps later. Also, I like to have it there as a way to mark progress.

The common core standards aren't a particular teaching method or anything, they're just a baseline of what kids should be able to accomplish by the end of a certain grade...and that just kind of seems like common sense to me. No one says that you can't teach beyond them.

 


AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Mar. 19, 2013 at 7:49 PM


But it isn't going to help these situations; that's why I don't understand it.

The CCS means that the state has to meet OR EXCEED those standards - so if School A is exceeding the standards, then the child transferring from School B (that only "meets" the standards) is still going to be behind.

Quoting kttycat84:

I know I'm the odd one out, but I don't think common core is a bad thing. I think it might actually help a lot of people, for instance, military families who move between states frequently. It can be hard on kids to go from doing advanced work in one public school's 5th grade to being behind in a different school's.

Personally, I use our state's common core standards as a measuring tool and a minimum. I like to make sure my kids are at least on par wtih those in ps, in case they or we decide to switch to ps later. Also, I like to have it there as a way to mark progress.

The common core standards aren't a particular teaching method or anything, they're just a baseline of what kids should be able to accomplish by the end of a certain grade...and that just kind of seems like common sense to me. No one says that you can't teach beyond them.



I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff: we have traditional gender roles, we're Catholic, I'm Libertarian, he's Republican, we're both conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee














mamaof2n1angel
by on Mar. 20, 2013 at 9:20 AM

Iam using CLASS- Christian liberty) wonder if they are changing  too.

somuchlove4U
by Bronze Member on Mar. 20, 2013 at 9:27 AM
From what I understand there isn't a choice to exceed CCS. They are rewriting school books to go with CCS. They've even stated to make a high score on the SAT the kids need to learn CCS.

Quoting AutymsMommy:


But it isn't going to help these situations; that's why I don't understand it.

The CCS means that the state has to meet OR EXCEED those standards - so if School A is exceeding the standards, then the child transferring from School B (that only "meets" the standards) is still going to be behind.


Quoting kttycat84:

I know I'm the odd one out, but I don't think common core is a bad thing. I think it might actually help a lot of people, for instance, military families who move between states frequently. It can be hard on kids to go from doing advanced work in one public school's 5th grade to being behind in a different school's.

Personally, I use our state's common core standards as a measuring tool and a minimum. I like to make sure my kids are at least on par wtih those in ps, in case they or we decide to switch to ps later. Also, I like to have it there as a way to mark progress.

The common core standards aren't a particular teaching method or anything, they're just a baseline of what kids should be able to accomplish by the end of a certain grade...and that just kind of seems like common sense to me. No one says that you can't teach beyond them.




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