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Common Core and Your Homeschool Curriculum (PIOG)

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Hi Ladies,

I just wanted to share this website with you. It was created by a homeschooling mom just this past week. She already has over 1100 likes on FB! She is researching all curriculum publishers in order to determine whether or not the publisher will be making changes in order to align with the Common Core Standards. If you are unfamiliar with the CCS, she also has many links to resources for further information.

http://www.theeducationalfreedomcoalition.org/

by on Mar. 16, 2013 at 3:45 PM
Replies (21-22):
AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Mar. 20, 2013 at 9:30 AM


Hmm. From what I understand, schools can indeed exceed CCS - they just can't meet lower than those standards.

Quoting somuchlove4U:

From what I understand there isn't a choice to exceed CCS. They are rewriting school books to go with CCS. They've even stated to make a high score on the SAT the kids need to learn CCS.

Quoting AutymsMommy:


But it isn't going to help these situations; that's why I don't understand it.

The CCS means that the state has to meet OR EXCEED those standards - so if School A is exceeding the standards, then the child transferring from School B (that only "meets" the standards) is still going to be behind.


Quoting kttycat84:

I know I'm the odd one out, but I don't think common core is a bad thing. I think it might actually help a lot of people, for instance, military families who move between states frequently. It can be hard on kids to go from doing advanced work in one public school's 5th grade to being behind in a different school's.

Personally, I use our state's common core standards as a measuring tool and a minimum. I like to make sure my kids are at least on par wtih those in ps, in case they or we decide to switch to ps later. Also, I like to have it there as a way to mark progress.

The common core standards aren't a particular teaching method or anything, they're just a baseline of what kids should be able to accomplish by the end of a certain grade...and that just kind of seems like common sense to me. No one says that you can't teach beyond them.






I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff: we have traditional gender roles, we're Catholic, I'm Libertarian, he's Republican, we're both conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee














bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Mar. 20, 2013 at 9:36 AM
2 moms liked this

 We train teachers for 4-5 years to tailor education to the individual children in their classrooms and tailor education to prepare them for the world and then tie their hands with these standards (why should only homeschoolers get individualization? We trained teachers to do it for large groups!  Let them!) 

According to CCS... in Kindergarten kids will learn to count in correspondences (Give one napkin to each child), here the kids learn that in pre-K, but the K teacher will have to teach it anyway to be in line with CCS.  Being "a little lax" will allow the already poor schools an excuse to "stay poor" and will force the good schools to slow down. 

Also in our particular ps, they were forced by the state to buy a "remediation curriculum" in order  prove that they were "properly implementing" these standards.  Who benefits from this purchase?  (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich) the publisher of the curriculum.  Who lost out?  They (ps) dropped the music curriculum for 1-4 grades and dropped one music teacher.

The scope and sequence is lax for the kids in regular ed classes but too fast for the special ed students.  Since schools get punished for having too many students in special ed classes (by needing to implement extra testing, corelating the scores of standardized tests differently, and getting judged more harshly on those standardized tests) they push many of those kids out of services.  The DofE KNOWS this and looks the other way.  So they require that those kids keep up with these standards (A Mess!).  How do they get these kids to stay on the track with these standards?  They teach remediational classes for them, taking away money for the extras for the regular learners. 

Our system is broken (not just the individual schools) and this CCS is not a good solution.

Until we recognize that "learning disabilities" are not a detriment to the school and create true resources for those kids and their teachers, standardizing the country will not fix the problem.

Quoting kttycat84:

I read over the standards, and I honestly don't think they sound bad...if anything, I think they're a little lax. The goals they outline should be able to be accomplished by their respective grade levels without teachers or parents needing to hire tutors or put kids in slower classes. Sure, it's not going to be perfect for every single kid, but that's one of the reason we don't use ps ourselves, we want to tailor our kids' educations on an individual level. I think for people who rely on ps the standards are not only acceptable, but a very good thing. I know I'd feel relieved if my oldest were still in ps...it was so nerve-wracking moving from NC to CA and realizing that she would have been close to 2 years behind if we hadn't homeschooled for pre-k and k (we started her in ps this year, but pulled her out after 2 weeks).

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 I think they could have been a good thing, but the "policy makers" relied on the biggest testing corporations and the biggest education publishing companies to come up with this brain child.  It has made it easier for the standardized testing companies to get a death grip on the market and opens a new market for "remediation" curriculum for McDougal Littel, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, and Houghton Mifflin (all of which had too much say IMO in creating tese standards to begin with.)  They could have created a good basis for scope and sequence, but they actually don't do that great of a job in that area.

Quoting kttycat84:

I know I'm the odd one out, but I don't think common core is a bad thing. I think it might actually help a lot of people, for instance, military families who move between states frequently. It can be hard on kids to go from doing advanced work in one public school's 5th grade to being behind in a different school's.

Personally, I use our state's common core standards as a measuring tool and a minimum. I like to make sure my kids are at least on par wtih those in ps, in case they or we decide to switch to ps later. Also, I like to have it there as a way to mark progress.

The common core standards aren't a particular teaching method or anything, they're just a baseline of what kids should be able to accomplish by the end of a certain grade...and that just kind of seems like common sense to me. No one says that you can't teach beyond them.

 

 

 

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