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What's so bad about common core?

What's so bad about common core? Maybe I'm showing my ignorance here but can someone please explain it to me? When I think of there being national standards for education across state lines I do see a benefit. If my child is in a public school and we move across the country in the middle of the year, at least they will be learning the same material right? Or is what's happening totally different?

by on Mar. 22, 2013 at 9:00 PM
Replies (21-30):
romacox
by Silver Member on Mar. 25, 2013 at 9:57 AM
2 moms liked this

BramblerPatch, one of the things that truly concerns me is that there is so much misinformation being said and taught about the Constitution.  We are losing our rights because we do not understand what they are or how to stand up to defend them when they have been violated.  Most people think the Supreme Court is the last word. 


Quoting BramblePatch:

Common Core is absolutely unconstitutional. I do not need another reason to dislike it. And for what its worth, wexwill NOT use any CC aligned curriculum in this house. Period.



QueenCreole313
by on Mar. 25, 2013 at 10:01 AM
1 mom liked this

After doing more research i have discovered that Common Core if it were a law would be unconstituional, hiever, it is not a law. It is not a requirement of the Federal government. All states had the option to adopt the standard. It is completely voluntary.

WantedNameTaken
by Member on Mar. 25, 2013 at 11:04 AM

You are absolutely correct.  I think what bothers many is that once individual states adopted Common Core, it became the law of the land for public schools within those states - full implementation is just around the corner.  Some states are reconsidering their adoption of it though. Mine isn't one of them sadly.

Quoting QueenCreole313:

After doing more research i have discovered that Common Core if it were a law would be unconstituional, hiever, it is not a law. It is not a requirement of the Federal government. All states had the option to adopt the standard. It is completely voluntary.


WantedNameTaken
by Member on Mar. 25, 2013 at 11:12 AM
1 mom liked this
snazzylady1
by Member on Mar. 25, 2013 at 11:39 AM

I agree with you.  I know that many teachers want to do the same but they can't.  I wouldn't want it for my children either. 

Tonya Simmons

smartandsnazzykids.com

romacox
by Silver Member on Mar. 25, 2013 at 11:49 AM
1 mom liked this

The Attorneys At: Home School Legal Defense Association write:' (Things are not as they appear on the surface....)

During President Obama’s 2012 State of the Union speech, the president stated, “We’ve convinced nearly every state in the country to raise their standards.” How were the states convinced to adopt the CCSS? The simple answer—federal dollars. President Obama added adopting the CCSS as a criterion for states to gain points in the Race to the Top education federal grant program, regardless of whether the state already had comparable or superior educational standards. States with the highest points are more likely to win the competitive Race to the Top federal grants

Will the CCSS Affect Homeschools?

The CCSS specifically do not apply to private or homeschools, unless they receive government dollars (online charter school programs have no such protection). However, HSLDA has serious concerns with the rush to adopt the CCSS. HSLDA has fought national education standards for the past two decades. Why? National standards lead to national curriculum and national tests, and subsequent pressure on homeschool students to be taught from the same curricula.

The College Board—the entity that created the PSAT and SAT—has already indicated that its signature college entrance exam will be aligned with the CCSS. And many homeschoolers worry that colleges and universities may look askance at homeschool graduates who apply for admission if their highschool transcripts are not aligned with the CCSS.

HSLDA believes that a one-size-fits-all approach to education crowds out other educational options, including the freedom of parents to choose homeschools and private schools. A common curriculum and tests based off common standards could be very harmful to homeschoolers if their college of choice refuses to accept a student’s high school transcript if it is not based on the CCSS. Homeschoolers could also have trouble on the SAT if the test is fundamentally altered to reflect only one specific curriculum. And our greatest worry is that if the CCSS is fully adopted by all states, policy makers down the road will attempt to change state legislation to require all students—including homeschool and private school students—to be taught and tested according to the CCSS.

Further Action

  • To find out whether your state has adopted the Common Core State Standards, you can visit this website’s useful map. (Please note that this is the website for the common core state standards initiative.)
  • Contact your state legislators, including the governor, to discuss this issue with them. Ask them about their position on the issue. Find your governor’s current information here.
  • If you have a governor’s election coming up in your state, we encourage you to raise this issue with the candidates. Even if a state has already adopted the national education standards, a new governor will be faced with the costs of implementing these new standards and new accountability to the federal government.
  • Numerous states that have already adopted the CCSS are considering rejecting the CCSS. Now is the time to help raise awareness of this issue and educate yourself about the CCSS.
  • Because this affects all parents, and will not currently affect homeschool freedom, it is not necessary to identify yourself as a homeschooler.

Read Full Article Here

The Washington Post, “They were developed by an organization called Achieve and the National Governors Association, both of which were generously funded by the Gates Foundation. There was minimal public engagement in the development of the Common Core. Their creation was neither grassroots nor did it emanate from the states.” Instead, Common Core is being driven by policymakers in D.C.

Common Core is set up in such a way that it can hardly be called voluntary. The Obama administration's grant program offers “Race to the Top” federal educational grants – which come from stimulus funds - to states if their school systems adopt preferred Obama policies like Common Core. States that adopt Common Core receive higher “scoring” from the Obama administration in their grant applications. As a result of this coercion, only Nebraska, Alaska, Texas, Virginia and Minnesota have not adopted Common Core. Minnesota adopted the language arts standards but kept its own math standards.

http://townhall.com/columnists/rachelalexander/2013/03/18/common-core-whats-hidden-behind-the-language-n1537017/page/full/

IntlMom12
by on Mar. 26, 2013 at 11:20 AM
1 mom liked this

Thank you for sharing this.

Quoting romacox:

The Attorneys At: Home School Legal Defense Association write:' (Things are not as they appear on the surface....)

During President Obama’s 2012 State of the Union speech, the president stated, “We’ve convinced nearly every state in the country to raise their standards.” How were the states convinced to adopt the CCSS? The simple answer—federal dollars. President Obama added adopting the CCSS as a criterion for states to gain points in the Race to the Top education federal grant program, regardless of whether the state already had comparable or superior educational standards. States with the highest points are more likely to win the competitive Race to the Top federal grants

Will the CCSS Affect Homeschools?

The CCSS specifically do not apply to private or homeschools, unless they receive government dollars (online charter school programs have no such protection). However, HSLDA has serious concerns with the rush to adopt the CCSS. HSLDA has fought national education standards for the past two decades. Why? National standards lead to national curriculum and national tests, and subsequent pressure on homeschool students to be taught from the same curricula.

The College Board—the entity that created the PSAT and SAT—has already indicated that its signature college entrance exam will be aligned with the CCSS. And many homeschoolers worry that colleges and universities may look askance at homeschool graduates who apply for admission if their highschool transcripts are not aligned with the CCSS.

HSLDA believes that a one-size-fits-all approach to education crowds out other educational options, including the freedom of parents to choose homeschools and private schools. A common curriculum and tests based off common standards could be very harmful to homeschoolers if their college of choice refuses to accept a student’s high school transcript if it is not based on the CCSS. Homeschoolers could also have trouble on the SAT if the test is fundamentally altered to reflect only one specific curriculum. And our greatest worry is that if the CCSS is fully adopted by all states, policy makers down the road will attempt to change state legislation to require all students—including homeschool and private school students—to be taught and tested according to the CCSS.

Further Action

  • To find out whether your state has adopted the Common Core State Standards, you can visit this website’s useful map. (Please note that this is the website for the common core state standards initiative.)
  • Contact your state legislators, including the governor, to discuss this issue with them. Ask them about their position on the issue. Find your governor’s current information here.
  • If you have a governor’s election coming up in your state, we encourage you to raise this issue with the candidates. Even if a state has already adopted the national education standards, a new governor will be faced with the costs of implementing these new standards and new accountability to the federal government.
  • Numerous states that have already adopted the CCSS are considering rejecting the CCSS. Now is the time to help raise awareness of this issue and educate yourself about the CCSS.
  • Because this affects all parents, and will not currently affect homeschool freedom, it is not necessary to identify yourself as a homeschooler.

Read Full Article Here

The Washington Post, “They were developed by an organization called Achieve and the National Governors Association, both of which were generously funded by the Gates Foundation. There was minimal public engagement in the development of the Common Core. Their creation was neither grassroots nor did it emanate from the states.” Instead, Common Core is being driven by policymakers in D.C.

Common Core is set up in such a way that it can hardly be called voluntary. The Obama administration's grant program offers “Race to the Top” federal educational grants – which come from stimulus funds - to states if their school systems adopt preferred Obama policies like Common Core. States that adopt Common Core receive higher “scoring” from the Obama administration in their grant applications. As a result of this coercion, only Nebraska, Alaska, Texas, Virginia and Minnesota have not adopted Common Core. Minnesota adopted the language arts standards but kept its own math standards.

http://townhall.com/columnists/rachelalexander/2013/03/18/common-core-whats-hidden-behind-the-language-n1537017/page/full/


Carmen
"For I know the thoughts that I think toward you, says the Lord, thoughts of peace and not of evil, to give you a future and a hope." Jeremiah 29:11 NKJ

kckmom3
by on Aug. 11, 2013 at 5:54 PM
1 mom liked this

I found a site called Truth In American Education not too long ago that has some info about Common Core. Sorry my computer won't let me make it "clicky".

romacox
by Silver Member on Aug. 11, 2013 at 6:23 PM
1 mom liked this

Since my computer does allow this, I put a clickable link to it for everyone's convenience. 

TruthInAmericanEducation.com


Quoting kckmom3:

I found a site called Truth In American Education not too long ago that has some info about Common Core. Sorry my computer won't let me make it "clicky".



kckmom3
by on Aug. 11, 2013 at 6:25 PM

Thank you!

Quoting romacox:

Since my computer does allow this, I put a clickable link to it for everyone's convenience. 

TruthInAmericanEducation.com


Quoting kckmom3:

I found a site called Truth In American Education not too long ago that has some info about Common Core. Sorry my computer won't let me make it "clicky".




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