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curriculum

Posted by on Mar. 23, 2013 at 8:32 AM
  • 16 Replies

        I was just wondering how much the curriculum's costs? I thought the local ps provides parents with  that? Can someone elaborate on this for me? Do you guys have designated "classrooms" in your home? Thanks again. 

"We read to know that we are not alone"-William Nicholson

by on Mar. 23, 2013 at 8:32 AM
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SusanTheWriter
by Bronze Member on Mar. 23, 2013 at 8:42 AM
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There are K12-type programs that are online and of use to families who want their kids home, but aren't able to take over teaching for various reasons.

However, many people who homeschool find curricula through other venues - some free, some inexpensive, some very expensive. Especially for young children, there are hundreds of online sites that will give you ways to teach all kinds of things. You can also go to homeschool conferences (tis the season, by the way - check your local area homeschool groups to see if there's anything nearby) and find various curricula for each subject, or you can purchase a "boxed" curriculum where one vendor (Abeka, Bob Jones and others) that can supply you with an entire curriculum for each grade - textbooks, workbooks, DVDs and online programs.

I suggest you take a look through Rebecca Rupp's Homeschooling Year by Year, Mary Pride's books, and Cathy Duffy's Homeschool Reviews to help you determine things like your teaching style and your child's learning style before you tackle purchasing curricula.

Good luck!

QueenCreole313
by Julia on Mar. 23, 2013 at 8:45 AM

I have yet to purchase a full curriculum. We piece ours together. It's cheaper and I buy books and materials as we need it. We don't have a designated classroom. Work can be done anywhere, as long as it gets done! 

jeweldragons
by on Mar. 23, 2013 at 8:47 AM

Don't have children yet (TTC) but already have Pre-K and K curriculum planned out.  It's pieced together by reading reviews on certain products.

NYCitymomx3
by Bronze Member on Mar. 23, 2013 at 9:35 AM
1 mom liked this


Quoting URHonor:

        I was just wondering how much the curriculum's costs? I thought the local ps provides parents with  that? Can someone elaborate on this for me? Do you guys have designated "classrooms" in your home? Thanks again. 

You can purchase an "all-in-one" curriculum that has all subjects plus lesson plans.  For 1 year (1 child) these start at around $400 and can go over $1000.  It's a popular option because everything is laid out for you.  They can be online or with lots of books or a combination of both.  

Many other parents choose to piece things together themselves due to different learning styles and more control over content.  More of an "eclectic" approach.  There are tons of programs for every subject.  You can spend $10 on a fantastic workbook or $99 on a really good history textbook.  You can also find your own educational websites, CD Roms, classes, and programs.  I spend less than $500 on a year's worth of books, programs, and supplies.  You just have to research what looks good and incorporate your child's interests and ideas.  This is what I do.  I don't like every part of all-in-one curriculums.  We use Saxon for math, Apologia for science, Hake for Grammar, and a bunch of other workbooks for writing, spelling, and vocabulary.  Plus we like good novels, take nature walks, watch documentaries, and go on lots of field trips.

Where I live, the public schools give us nothing (which I prefer, actually).  In other areas, I hear homeschoolers could sign up for K12 for free - a full public-school-type online program.  Some public schools even allow homeschoolers to take a few classes there or participate in after-school activities.  You have to ask.

I definitely do not have a designated classroom in my house.  I homeschool in a very relaxed way - either lounging on the couch or sitting at the dining room table.  

Good luck on your decision.

Rust.n.Gears
by on Mar. 23, 2013 at 9:42 AM
1 mom liked this

I would never want to use the curriculums that the public schools offer. They are very lacking in their concepts.

I build my own curriculum from some bought items and many things from our local library. You can buy completely pre-made ones as well.

 


URHonor
by on Mar. 23, 2013 at 10:03 AM

Thanks! If you're in NYC I'm pretty close. I'm in Newark (NJ). It's like 15 mins from the city without traffic. 

Quoting NYCitymomx3:


Quoting URHonor:

        I was just wondering how much the curriculum's costs? I thought the local ps provides parents with  that? Can someone elaborate on this for me? Do you guys have designated "classrooms" in your home? Thanks again. 

You can purchase an "all-in-one" curriculum that has all subjects plus lesson plans.  For 1 year (1 child) these start at around $400 and can go over $1000.  It's a popular option because everything is laid out for you.  They can be online or with lots of books or a combination of both.  

Many other parents choose to piece things together themselves due to different learning styles and more control over content.  More of an "eclectic" approach.  There are tons of programs for every subject.  You can spend $10 on a fantastic workbook or $99 on a really good history textbook.  You can also find your own educational websites, CD Roms, classes, and programs.  I spend less than $500 on a year's worth of books, programs, and supplies.  You just have to research what looks good and incorporate your child's interests and ideas.  This is what I do.  I don't like every part of all-in-one curriculum's.  We use Saxon for math, Apologia for science, Hake for Grammar, and a bunch of other workbooks for writing, spelling, and vocabulary.  Plus we like good novels, take nature walks, watch documentaries, and go on lots of field trips.

Where I live, the public schools give us nothing (which I prefer, actually).  In other areas, I hear homeschoolers could sign up for K12 for free - a full public-school-type online program.  Some public schools even allow homeschoolers to take a few classes there or participate in after-school activities.  You have to ask.

I definitely do not have a designated classroom in my house.  I home school in a very relaxed way - either lounging on the couch or sitting at the dining room table.  

Good luck on your decision.


"We read to know that we are not alone"-William Nicholson

bekalynne440
by on Mar. 23, 2013 at 10:03 AM

In the beginning it can be quite cheap.  I'm only in the beginning so I can't tell you about past that, though I know it can very greatly depending on how you want to do it and what curriculum you use. 

Ds is turning 4, though he will be using kindergarten curriculum in the fall (that's just where he's at right now).  Up till this point we've only spent $1 here and $5 there on crafting supplies and worksheet books (ds loves worksheets, goofy kid).  Oh, and we also spent just a little more than that on some Bob books.  We don't buy work books anymore, however, as I've found many sites through pinterest with free printable worksheets.  Pintrest can be a great aide.  We had kindergarten-2nd grade Hooked on Phonics curriculum GIVEN to us by another homeschooling mom who only used the kindergarten and wanted them to go to good use.  In the fall we are looking at kindergarten curriculum that costs $120-$150.  So far I would say our costs are pretty low, though they can get up their if you choose.  I looked at one kindergarten curriculum that was like $600!

URHonor
by on Mar. 23, 2013 at 10:10 AM

Thanks for all the information. I'm feeling pretty overwhelmed but you guys are giving me so many ideas. It's helping already.  I'm starting to believe it's going to be what's best for her. 

"We read to know that we are not alone"-William Nicholson

AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Mar. 23, 2013 at 10:11 AM

Oh no. Unless you go through a virtual public school (in which case your child is a public school student, not legally homeschooled), the schools do not provide curriculum (here - and nowhere else that I'm aware of).

Everyone spends a different amount.

Next year I'm homeschooling a 12 year old and a 4 year old formally; I'll spend around $1,000 between the two of them.

We do not have a classroom in the home. We do our work all over the house, lol. Usually in the dining room or living room.

I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff: we have traditional gender roles, we're Catholic, I'm Libertarian, he's Republican, we're both conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee














romacox
by Silver Member on Mar. 23, 2013 at 12:58 PM
1 mom liked this

There are a number of methods available to home educators that are not available to the curriculum  mandated to public schools.  I personally like the eclectic method which allows me to take the best of all the methods.  I also create many of my own lessons, and purchase only the curriculum I need.  I much prefer the curriculum created by home school families, because they understand that home school is not the classroom.

The following article gives information about the various methods along with resources.  How To Home School


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