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Homeschooling a 7 year old

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So, I've been homeschooling my son since September. He is 7 & just finishing up 1st grade. He started off really well. He listened, did his work & we were having fun too... But ever since January it has been a nightmare. We changed curriculums, tried different schedules, incentives & anything you can think of & still nothing works. He says its boring, not fun, he's tired, doesn't want to do anything that has to do with school.

now I don't know if this is normal behavior for a 7 yr old or if I need to do something else. What we are doing now is that if he doesn't do his school work he has to do chores instead. No playing, no fun. I'm trying to make him understand that school is part of our daily life....

Any suggestions or similar experiences with boys this age?

by on Mar. 27, 2013 at 5:49 PM
Replies (11-20):
blueyedbaker
by on Mar. 28, 2013 at 9:16 AM

I'm not sure if I can help since I have 2 girls ages 6(7 in April) and 10. My 6 year old does her work before her sister and is happy to do her work. My 10 year old complains every second. Our rules: no TV when the sun is up! So they know that no matter what they get no TV (and they like their TV!) And if they don't get the work done then there is not TV later.  We take breaks too. We start our day at 9 and take lunch at 11. But some days we stop just before lunch to bake something or do our science experiments or we go outside for a walk. I have a book about the different months and what to look for during the different seasons so we bring that with us. I try to break up the day so they don't get crabby.

blueyedbaker
by on Mar. 28, 2013 at 9:22 AM
Also I wanted to add that we have a classroom that has the girls desks and books and stuff. We always start out in there at the beginning of the school year but by January we end up in my bedroom one child on my bed the other on the floor and I don't mind. For me I don't care if they sit in a chair at a desk or not. I know both my girls can sit and do their work but we're home schooling and I want them to be comfortable, I want to be comfortable too. There is going to be plenty of time for them to have to sit at a desk when they are older right now though is our time and if they want to lay on their back on my bedroom floor(as long as they do the work) I don't mind at all.
KickButtMama
by Shannon on Mar. 28, 2013 at 9:44 AM
1 mom liked this

My youngest just turned 9 and he is the same. He hit a point at about 7/8 where he dragged his feet as well. Some of it was testing bounderies. But most of it was because the work was more challenging and he didn't get the answers right every single time, especially right at the beginning. So we stopped any worksheet/quiz/test type learning and changed it to hands on, discussions and lapbooks. They are visual and while they include the same information as a worksheet, it doesn't seem like it. I also changed to focus on some of the things he was interested in learning. Once he got comfortable, we began adding in the more traditional learning. Once he was past that developmental block it worked out well.

Good Luck!

Quoting tlwl72:

So I looked at the link & I believe my son is closes to the NF learning style. The idealist.... He is a perfectionist, very sensitive & always wants to please me but just hates doing school work. He is very smart & loves to learn. But I still want him doing seat work.


 Home Educators Toolbox  / Articles / Kicbuttmama's Crazy Lapbooks / Kickbuttmama's Home Education
Albert Einstein -- 
   "Everybody is a Genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will spend its whole life believing it is stupid." 

tuffymama
by Bronze Member on Mar. 28, 2013 at 10:00 AM
1 mom liked this
Quoting romacox:

These children love to learn, but they do not like doing something they already know just to prove they know it. They will tell you it is boring.  They want to learn something new, but something that interests them.

  Find out what interests him, and use that to teach him other subjects like reading, math ext.  For example, one of the boys I tutor loves star Wars, and I gave an example about how I used that to get him to read.

These children typically walk and talk a little late,.  They are capable, but will not show it until they are confident,  because They are perfectionists. They also do not take off reading until about third grade.

My grandson is an analytical personality.  His Mom read the Book "Better Late Than Early".  Koty had learned all his phonic sounds, could read large words like premium as they played word games while traveling.  He could also read all his early reader books, but would not read independently.  As the book (Better Late Than Early) advised, she continued reading to him daily.  One day he came to her, and asked her to read a book who's cover interested him.  She told him that she did not have the time right then.  Koty, anxious to find out what was inside the interesting cover,  read it independently.  She let him stay up late that night to finish reading on his own.  From that day forward he became an avid reader, and advanced beyond his grade level very quickly. 

So, he will be easier than you think to teach, but not if he is a round peg forced into a square hole.  The beauty of homeschooling is that we can adjust our teaching styles to each individual child, rather than fitting the child to a one size fits all approach. 

Lesson Plans That Motivate  will give you some more ideas.



I love this story! This is kind of what happened to me. I could read at three, but would NOT read out loud in class or read a book for pleasure. I made my poor dad read the newspaper to me all the time, and my poor granddaddy used to read to me until he was hoarse. When I was six, we moved way out to the country and the closest kids were a mile down the road and much older than I. My mother never had any patience for kids, and one day, I picked up Little Women and just started reading. That summer and into the school year, I went through all my Alcotts, Stuart Little, Charlotte's Web, Trumpet of the Swan, and then I mowed through my mom's cookbooks. I didn't always understand what I was reading at first, so the dictionary became a near constant companion. And THAT is why I was a repeat spelling bee champ and even went to Nationals. It is wonderful what kids can do when adults get out of the way and let them learn in the best ways for their brains. This has been an abiding example for me, because as a perfectionist myself, I want to control things. LO is so much like me and really does need to lead his education in a lot of ways.
Jlee4249
by Member on Mar. 28, 2013 at 11:06 AM
First, The best part of homeschooling is you don't need to mimic public schools.
Reading to them while they're upside down, jumping around numbers written in sidewalk chalk outside... The only worksheets we do is math, and that's in between math games. Even their writing is done in conjunction with art.
second, have you looked into lapbooks? Or even Unit studies?
I have yet to actually do a lapbook, but I loved the idea so much. We made a world book, starting with continents & moving down to individual countries... But the lapbook ideas came into play on the individual pages. They're made of construction paper, so they act as dividers for the countries in the binder. Each page has a hand-colored cutout of the continent, then flip books of facts about the continent. (South Africa has the driest place on earth, the tallest waterfall, etc. And, of course, list the countries in which they're found). We had to look at measurements, comparisons, goegraphy, rivers, mountain ranges, weather, altitude, etc.
It was fun making it. Africa has a big camel pasted just behind the continent. We cut the hump to serve as a pop-up, with interesting facts about a camel underneath.
My 7yo loved it & looked forward to making each page, based on a minimum of three books as sources... Reading and discovering interesting things about each one was never a battle.
mem82
by Platinum Member on Mar. 28, 2013 at 11:30 AM

I had a lot of trouble with my son at the age of 7.

lucsch
by on Mar. 28, 2013 at 12:23 PM

I have this "brain wiring" myself. Prior to discovering it,  I never understood why I was so different from everyone else.  School was agony, because I felt like I did not fit into the crowd. The first time I ever felt like I fit in was in college, studying engineering.

For a 7yo, all he really needs is to learn to read and to do some simple math. Spend the rest of the time playing games, doing things together, and read a wide variety of children's literature to him. There are recommended reading  lists out there.

One of my sons, who was never homeschooled, had a voracious appetite for nonfiction, especially science, as a preschooler. I would read and read to him. Some of the stuff was beyond my understanding, but he soaked it up like a sponge. He is at the top of his pharmacy school class now.

Quoting romacox:

You are most welcome, tlwf72 .  Mothers have a natural instinct when it comes to their children, and I hear your deep concern to do the right thing by him.  You will find that good balance.

I had several NTs in my family, and in my tutoring.  They are a lot of fun because they are, in many ways, mature beyond their years.  They can carry on very intelligent conversations with adults that is well beyond their years.  They can be very stubborn too,  when they  do not see a logical reason for doing something. The problem is they do not have the experience you do when it comes to making that decision. 

NTs can drive adults crazy with their constant, "Why?".  They aren't trying to be annoying.  They just have an insatiable apatite to understand everything.  So, I try to answer their why question as much as I possibly can.  



romacox
by Silver Member on Mar. 28, 2013 at 1:38 PM

That is a neat story,  Thanks for sharing it.


Quoting tuffymama:

Quoting romacox:

These children love to learn, but they do not like doing something they already know just to prove they know it. They will tell you it is boring.  They want to learn something new, but something that interests them.

  Find out what interests him, and use that to teach him other subjects like reading, math ext.  For example, one of the boys I tutor loves star Wars, and I gave an example about how I used that to get him to read.

These children typically walk and talk a little late,.  They are capable, but will not show it until they are confident,  because They are perfectionists. They also do not take off reading until about third grade.

My grandson is an analytical personality.  His Mom read the Book "Better Late Than Early".  Koty had learned all his phonic sounds, could read large words like premium as they played word games while traveling.  He could also read all his early reader books, but would not read independently.  As the book (Better Late Than Early) advised, she continued reading to him daily.  One day he came to her, and asked her to read a book who's cover interested him.  She told him that she did not have the time right then.  Koty, anxious to find out what was inside the interesting cover,  read it independently.  She let him stay up late that night to finish reading on his own.  From that day forward he became an avid reader, and advanced beyond his grade level very quickly. 

So, he will be easier than you think to teach, but not if he is a round peg forced into a square hole.  The beauty of homeschooling is that we can adjust our teaching styles to each individual child, rather than fitting the child to a one size fits all approach. 

Lesson Plans That Motivate  will give you some more ideas.



I love this story! This is kind of what happened to me. I could read at three, but would NOT read out loud in class or read a book for pleasure. I made my poor dad read the newspaper to me all the time, and my poor granddaddy used to read to me until he was hoarse. When I was six, we moved way out to the country and the closest kids were a mile down the road and much older than I. My mother never had any patience for kids, and one day, I picked up Little Women and just started reading. That summer and into the school year, I went through all my Alcotts, Stuart Little, Charlotte's Web, Trumpet of the Swan, and then I mowed through my mom's cookbooks. I didn't always understand what I was reading at first, so the dictionary became a near constant companion. And THAT is why I was a repeat spelling bee champ and even went to Nationals. It is wonderful what kids can do when adults get out of the way and let them learn in the best ways for their brains. This has been an abiding example for me, because as a perfectionist myself, I want to control things. LO is so much like me and really does need to lead his education in a lot of ways.



romacox
by Silver Member on Mar. 28, 2013 at 1:43 PM


That is fascinating.  It is so interesting to hear the individual stories.  By allowing children their own learning styles, they end up finding their passion in life.  Thanks for sharing. 

Quoting lucsch:

I have this "brain wiring" myself. Prior to discovering it,  I never understood why I was so different from everyone else.  School was agony, because I felt like I did not fit into the crowd. The first time I ever felt like I fit in was in college, studying engineering.

For a 7yo, all he really needs is to learn to read and to do some simple math. Spend the rest of the time playing games, doing things together, and read a wide variety of children's literature to him. There are recommended reading  lists out there.

One of my sons, who was never homeschooled, had a voracious appetite for nonfiction, especially science, as a preschooler. I would read and read to him. Some of the stuff was beyond my understanding, but he soaked it up like a sponge. He is at the top of his pharmacy school class now.

Quoting romacox:

You are most welcome, tlwf72 .  Mothers have a natural instinct when it comes to their children, and I hear your deep concern to do the right thing by him.  You will find that good balance.

I had several NTs in my family, and in my tutoring.  They are a lot of fun because they are, in many ways, mature beyond their years.  They can carry on very intelligent conversations with adults that is well beyond their years.  They can be very stubborn too,  when they  do not see a logical reason for doing something. The problem is they do not have the experience you do when it comes to making that decision. 

NTs can drive adults crazy with their constant, "Why?".  They aren't trying to be annoying.  They just have an insatiable apatite to understand everything.  So, I try to answer their why question as much as I possibly can.  





tlwl72
by on Mar. 28, 2013 at 6:26 PM
1 mom liked this

I think we will take a break from traditional school & put the workbooks away for now. We are going to explore his interests, do lots of reading, projects & experiments. Incorporate school while we have fun! He has a good understanding of his reading, writing & math. We just need to improve on them, which we will work at throughout the summer. And then re-evaluate before we start 2nd grade. Sounds like this is pretty typical behavior for this age, so I don't feel too bad! He loves learning & he asks a million questions everyday so teaching him without the workbooks shouldn't be a problem... Thanks for all the suggestions & help

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