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Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

We are in the process of moving to Ohio from Wv.My son has missed a few weeks of homeschooling

Posted by on Mar. 30, 2013 at 4:46 PM
  • 3 Replies

Could someone tell me what he basical needs to finish up to pass.I have to see portifiolo within the next 4 weeks.He's in the 9th grade.Any help would be appeciated.

by on Mar. 30, 2013 at 4:46 PM
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lucsch
by on Mar. 30, 2013 at 5:00 PM

Move on over to Indiana, where the only requirement is 180 days per calendar year. You don't do a portfolio, testing, or reporting here. The only guidelines we use for high school are those required by the colleges to get in and of course for the student to do well on the SAT or ACT.

Ohio has more, but I suspect since you just moved, you can just start over for 10th grade.

OHIO

 

Compulsory Attendance Ages: “between six and eighteen years of age.” Ohio Revised Code
Annotated § 3321.01(A)(1).

Required Days of Instruction: 900 hours. Ohio Administrative Code § 3301-34-03(A)(8).

Required Subjects: Language, reading, spelling, writing, geography, history of the
United States and Ohio, government, math, science, health, physical
education, fine arts (including music), first aid, safety, and fire
prevention. Ohio Admin. Code § 3301-34-03(A)(5).

 

Homeschool Statute: Ohio Rev. Code Ann. § 3321.04(A)(2). See also Ohio Admin. Code § 3301-34.

 

Ohio Rev. Code Ann. § 3321.04(A)(2) provides for home education in Ohio. Ohio Administrative Code
Chapter 3301-34 (“Excuses From Compulsory Attendance for Home Education”) prescribes the rules
governing excuses from school attendance under this statute:

 

1. “‘Home education’ means education primarily directed and provided by the parent . . .” Ohio Admin.
Code § 3301-34-01(B).

 

2. “The purpose of the rules in this chapter is to prescribe conditions governing the issuance of excuses
from school attendance under section 3321.04 . . . to provide for the consistent application thereof
throughout the state by superintendents, and to safeguard the primary right of parents to provide the
education for their child(ren). Home education must be in accordance with the law.” Ohio Admin.
Code § 3301-34-02 (emph. added).

 

3. A parent must provide an annual notification to homeschool to the appropriate superintendent which
shall include (Ohio Admin. Code § 3301-34-03(A)):

 

a. School year for which notification is made;
b. Name and address of the parent, and full name and birth date of child;
c. Name and address of person(s) who will be teaching the child, if other than the parent;


d. Assurance that the homeschool will include the required subjects listed above (“except that home
education shall not be required to include any concept, topic, or practice that is in conflict with the
sincerely held religious beliefs of the parent”);

e. A brief outline of intended curriculum and list of textbooks or other basic teaching materials;
“Such outline . . . [and] list is for informational purposes only”; and

f. Assurance of hours and qualifications (see below).

 

4. The superintendent shall review the information within 14 calendar days and “determine if it is in
compliance” with the rules. If the homeschooler’s information is incomplete, the superintendent will
notify the parents in writing and give them 14 days to supplement information or meet with him. If
the “superintendent has substantial evidence that the minimum educational requirements of


paragraph A [Ohio Admin. Code § 3301-34-03(A)] will not be met,” he shall deny the excuse. He
must state the reason and inform the parents of their right to a due process hearing before him (he
must provide a record of proceedings and allow for oral testimony). Ohio Admin. Code
§ 3301-34-03(C) and (D). If the superintendent completely denies the homeschool, the family has
10 days to appeal to the local juvenile court pursuant to Ohio Rev. Code § 3331.08. [See Svoboda v.
Andrisek, 514 N.E.2d 1140 (1986) for appeal guidelines where the Court of Appeals ruled in favor of
a homeschool family represented by HSLDA.]

 

5. In Ohio v. Whisner, 47 Ohio St.2d 181, 351 N.E.2d 750 (1976), the Ohio Supreme Court stated “ . . .
it has long been recognized that the right of a parent to guide the education, including the religious
education, of his or her children is indeed a fundamental right guaranteed by the Due Process Clause
of the Fourteenth Amendment.” 47 Ohio St.2d at 214.

 

Teacher Qualifications: Ohio Admin. Code § 3301-34-03(A)(9). The homeschool teacher must have a
high school diploma or GED or test scores which demonstrate high school equivalence, or the parent
must “work under the direction of a person holding a baccalaureate degree . . . until children’s test results
demonstrate reasonable proficiency . . . .”

 

Standardized Tests: Parents who homeschool have three options for assessment. Ohio Admin. Code §
3301-34-04. At the time of notification, the family must send to their school district one of the three
items listed below:

 

1. A child’s test scores. If a child is tested, the child must have a composite score at least at the
25th percentile on a nationally normed standardized achievement test administered by either (a)
an Ohio licensed or certified teacher, excluding the certification of teachers in nontax-supported
schools provided under Ohio Rev. Code § 3301.071, (b) the public school, (c) “[an]other person
mutually agreed upon” by the parents and superintendent, or (d) a “person duly authorized by the
publisher of the test.”
a. If the child fails to demonstrate reasonable proficiency on the assessment, the
superintendent shall notify the parents in writing they must submit a plan of remediation
within 30 days. The parent must then submit quarterly reports to include (a) a narrative of
the child’s progress with explanation if the child has made less than satisfactory progress
in a subject and (b) an explanation if the intended curriculum plan was not covered for the
quarter.
b. The superintendent may terminate a remediation plan at any time if the child is
progressing. If not, the superintendent shall revoke the child’s excuse from attendance,
giving the parents 30 days written notice to enroll in a lawful school. Parents shall have
ten days to appeal the superintendent’ s decision to the juvenile court judge. Ohio Admin
Code § 3301-34-05.





 2. A “written narrative indicating that a portfolio of samples of the child’s work has been reviewed
and that the child’s academic progress for the year is in accordance with the child’s abilities.” (If
a written narrative is prepared, it must be written by either (a) a licensed or certified teacher,
excluding the certification of teachers in nontax-supported schools provided under Ohio Rev.
Code § 3301.071, or (b) “[an]other person mutually agreed upon.”)

 


Copyright 2012-2013, HSLDA, all rights reserved. May be reproduced only by permission.

THIS ANALYSIS DOES NOT CONSTITUTE THE GIVING OF LEGAL ADVICE.

Call or write to receive a free copy of HSLDA’s newsletter and membership application.

P.O. Box 3000 • Purcellville, VA 20134 • Phone: (540) 338-5600 • Fax: (540) 338-2733 • Website: www.hslda.org

 

3. An alternative assessment mutually agreed upon by the parents and the superintendent.


 

Alternative ways to privately educate children: Ohio Administrative Code 3301-35-08 allows schools
with truly held religious beliefs to be established without a charter from the State Board of Education.
These schools, officially “non-chartered, non-tax-supported schools,” have come to be known as “-08
schools.”

 

Before Ohio’s homeschooling regulation was promulgated in 1989, some parents who qualified
established these “-08 schools” to comply with Ohio compulsory attendance laws. Since 1989, some
families continue to establish -08 schools to privately educate their children at home. After years of
negotiation and litigation between the ODE and HSLDA, the Ohio Department of Education (ODE)
appears to have ceased to object to the practice of parents forming single family schools to privately
educate children in a home as long as there are 5 or fewer enrolled students. In 2009, a hearing officer
decided that families with 6 or more students enrolled in a home based -08 school must comply with
Ohio’s educational group E fire codes.

 

Because there are a number of requirements and qualifications for forming an -08 school, HSLDA
encourages members who have questions to read HSLDA’s -08 schools memo contained in the forms and
resources section of HSLDA’s Ohio webpage. HSLDA will assist families who, because of truly held
religious beliefs, organize single-family -08 schools to educate their own children. If you are considering
privately educating your children in Ohio under this regulation, please contact HSLDA for more
information.

kirbymom
by Sonja on Mar. 30, 2013 at 5:45 PM

Hi ANGS71. :)   

Since you only missed a few weeks, I wouldn't think you would need to worry too much. You can supplement some of your day to day life and correlate that to the right subjects for applying it as his schoolwork. For instance, if he did any kind of cooking, that can be turned into math lessons and science lessons and reading lessons. Same as watching any type of history show for History lessons. And so on and so forth. 

kirbymom
by Sonja on Mar. 30, 2013 at 6:13 PM

THINKING ABOUT HOME SCHOOLING?

Suzi Milovanovic


If you are homeschooling or considering home school as an option in the state of Ohio, there are several pieces of information that you should know before you begin and as you go through your home school education.

Girl being homeschooled

Homeschooling is legally permitted in all fifty states, but laws and regulations vary from state to state. In Ohio, homeschooling is regulated by the Ohio Administrative Code (OAC), Chapter 3301-34 which legally excuses children from compulsory attendance.

 

The first step is to provide an annual notification to homeschool to the appropriate superintendent. The notification must be in writing and include the following information:
•    School year for which notification is made;
•    Name of parent, address, and telephone number (telephone number optional);
•    Name, address and telephone number (telephone number optional) of person(s) who will be teaching the child the subjects set forth in paragraph (a)(5) of this rule, if other than the parent;
•    Full name and birth date of child to be educated at home;
•    Assurance that home education will include the following, except that home education shall not be required to include any concept, topic or practice that is in conflict with the sincerely held religious beliefs of the parent:
    (a) language, reading, spelling and writing 
    (b) geography, history of the United States and Ohio; and national, state and local government; 
    (c) mathematics; 
    (d) science; 
    (e) health; 
    (f) physical education; 
    (g) fine arts, including music; and 
    (h) first aid, safety, and fire prevention 
•    Brief outline of the intended curriculum for the current year. Such outline is for informational purposes only.
•    List of textbooks, correspondence courses, commercial curricula, or other basic teaching materials that the parent intends under the direction of a person holding a baccalaureate degree from a recognized college until the child's or children's test results demonstrate reasonable proficiency or until the home teacher obtains a high school diploma or the certificate of high school equivalence.
•    Assurance that the child will be provided a minimum of nine hundred hours of home education each school year.
•    Assurance that the home teacher has one of the following qualifications:
    (a) A high school diploma; or
    (b) The certificate of high school equivalence; or
    (c) Standardized test scores that demonstrate high school equivalence; or
    (d) Other equivalent credential found appropriate by the superintendent; or
    (e) Lacking the above, the home teacher must work under the direction of a person holding a baccalaureate degree from a recognized college until the child's or children's test results demonstrate reasonable proficiency or until the home teacher obtains a high school diploma or the certificate of high school equivalence.
•    The parent(s) shall affirm the information supplied with his or her signature prior to providing it to the superintendent.

 

Also, an academic assessment report of the child must be sent to the superintendent annually. This report can be the results of a nationally standardized test or it can be a written narrative indicating that a portfolio of the child's work has been reviewed by a certified teacher. Keep in mind that the superintendent does reserve the right to intervene if the results of the standardized testing are not as expected. Usually, a plan for remediation is developed and if adequate progress is not made during that time, the superintendent may revoke the excuse from attendance.

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