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Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

Unschooling?

Posted by on Mar. 31, 2013 at 10:51 AM
  • 11 Replies


Can someone guide me in a direction about unschooling?  I have read places that it is where the child learns about things they want to learn about.  I want more information.  I need more information.  I downloaded a book, but it is kind of confusing.  I guess I need the unschooling for dummies book (wondering if there is such a thing).


Thanks everyone.  Happy Easter!

by on Mar. 31, 2013 at 10:51 AM
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romacox
by Silver Member on Mar. 31, 2013 at 2:02 PM

Unschooling focuses on the individual child's self initiative, needs and interests for education. Many think this method has no discipline or direction because the full fledged unschoolers often have no set bedtimes, no set lessons, and no set food rules. But the hard core unschooling parent points out they do make rules on the important things like safety.

They also say there is no such thing as a partial use of unschooling. Either you trust the child's natural tendency to learn or you don't. However others disagree, and I caution the reader not to be too quick to reject this method. It, in my opinion, can be incorporated in ones homeschool schedule, and be very beneficial to you and your child.

Unschooling (or at least a form of it) is particularly attractive to the NT parent, and beneficial to the Nt Child (ratrional personality). My little brother is what is referred to as the NT or "Rational Personality". He often ditched his elementary school classes. So one day the school principle followed him only to discover Billy was going to the local library to study subjects that interested him. You see the NT personality has an insensible appetite to learn, but is totally bored reviewing subjects that he has already grasped, or proving to others he has learned something he has already mastered. He considers it a total waste of time...one can be learning instead of wasting time in this manner. Note: Einstein was an NT. Allowing these children to direct their own learning (at least to some extent) helps to develop their unique gifts.

In this style of homeschooling, it is important to understand the child in depth, and to provide a variety of activities, and learning tools that interests him or her. Lagos or Barbie dolls can become learning tools. Just as my little brother chose his preferred method and subjects to learn, so does the unschooled child.

My Father was also an NT personality, and I learned more for him about analytical thinking than I did in any class room. So nurture the rational child, and allow him to contribute his unique gifts to your family.

The Unschooling Handbook : How to Use the Whole World As Your Child's Classroom

easter eggHappy Easter to you Too.

romacox
by Silver Member on Mar. 31, 2013 at 3:06 PM

P.S. My little brother was also fascinated with the board game Monopoly from 5 years of age, and into his early teens ...obsessed is more like it.  He learned from that game to read, strategy, counting money, adding, subtracting, and who knows what else.   At a very young age he bought his first home in L.A. which is a difficult place to purchase homes unless one is very wealthy (he wasn't.).  When he sold it, he made a  $200,000.00. profit.  

So even games can become learning tools.

KickButtMama
by Shannon on Mar. 31, 2013 at 5:36 PM
1 mom liked this

Unschooling is an umbrella term that refers to any non-pre-packaged curriculum. I prefer the term Child - Led. 

You can read what MY verson of unschooling/child led is - http://kickbuttcrazylapbooks.blogspot.com/search?q=Defining+our+HS

kirbymom
by Sonja on Mar. 31, 2013 at 5:55 PM
2 moms liked this

Hi leigh. :)  Here is something else you might want to read that helps explain unschooling.

I must create a system of my own, or be enslaved by another man's. 
~ William Blake


What is Unschooling? 
Karen M. Gibson

Unschooling has many, many definitions - probably a different one for each family that calls themselves unschoolers. To me, unschooling means interest-led or child-led learning. There are also many different levels of unschooling. Some families require a set amount of Math and English done each day, and then their child is free to explore whatever subjects he would like. Others unschool totally until their child reaches a certain grade level, and then start requiring some structure. And then there are the dyed-in-the-wool, radical unschoolers, who require nothing from their child. They totally trust their child to learn what he needs to know on his own timetable.

How unschooling works for us

The more we explore the avenues that work the best for our family, the more we find ourselves gravitating towards total, radical unschooling, with the child leading his learning all the way. We do use some textbooks and workbooks, but only if the child has said that he would like to. Unschooling does not mean no textbooks or no curriculum. If a child prefers to learn that way, or expresses a desire for a certain level of structure, that’s fine, as long as it is the child’s wish. Our main resources, though, are the public library, the Internet, computer games, books, and real-life experiences.

Unschooling also does not mean no parental involvement. If anything, it requires that you, the parent, be totally aware of the needs of your child. It means having on hand many resources, making suggestions of new avenues of exploration, and being able to hunt down that elusive answer or needed resource. It means finding a place for your child to volunteer or apprentice. It means seeking out the person who can give lessons or advice on a particular career. It means joining a group that you have no interest in so that your child can explore more fully his area of interest.

I find that one of the hardest things with unschooling is learning to trust that your child will learn what he needs to know for his own life, in his own time frame. He may not cover all the same subjects and curriculums that everyone else at his age covers; he might cover them earlier or later. It's also possible that he may never cover those subjects if they are not pertinent to his life. I truly believe that each child is unique, and that it’s my job to help that child become the person he was born to be. I can’t force my child to learn anything that he isn’t ready to learn for himself - and if he’s ready to learn it for himself, then why do I need to teach it to him? All I need to do is provide what he needs and help, if he asks for it.


Copyright February 1999

romacox
by Silver Member on Mar. 31, 2013 at 6:09 PM


I went to your website, and saw where you are now selling your laptop lessons.  The best curriculum (if you can call it curriculum)  out there is created by home educators.  If you put it on Amazon, I would be willing to sell it on my website.  Here is the link to do that:  Amazon Sellers Account. You can fill your own orders, otherwise Amazon charges a warehouse fee. 

Quoting KickButtMama:

Unschooling is an umbrella term that refers to any non-pre-packaged curriculum. I prefer the term Child - Led. 

You can read what MY verson of unschooling/child led is - http://kickbuttcrazylapbooks.blogspot.com/search?q=Defining+our+HS



KickButtMama
by Shannon on Mar. 31, 2013 at 6:10 PM

Awesome, I'm actually in the middle of trying to set up my own Amazon shop - I'll let you know as soon as I get it all set!

Quoting romacox:


I went to your website, and saw where you are now selling your laptop lessons.  The best curriculum (if you can call it curriculum)  out there is created by home educators.  If you put it on Amazon, I would be willing to sell it on my website.  Here is the link to do that:  Amazon Sellers Account. You can fill your own orders, otherwise Amazon charges a warehouse fee. 

Quoting KickButtMama:

Unschooling is an umbrella term that refers to any non-pre-packaged curriculum. I prefer the term Child - Led. 

You can read what MY verson of unschooling/child led is - http://kickbuttcrazylapbooks.blogspot.com/search?q=Defining+our+HS




romacox
by Silver Member on Mar. 31, 2013 at 6:14 PM


Awesome.  Let me know when Amazon generates your widgets and links.  Also let me know what to look for so I can find them. 

Quoting KickButtMama:

Awesome, I'm actually in the middle of trying to set up my own Amazon shop - I'll let you know as soon as I get it all set!

Quoting romacox:


I went to your website, and saw where you are now selling your laptop lessons.  The best curriculum (if you can call it curriculum)  out there is created by home educators.  If you put it on Amazon, I would be willing to sell it on my website.  Here is the link to do that:  Amazon Sellers Account. You can fill your own orders, otherwise Amazon charges a warehouse fee. 

Quoting KickButtMama:

Unschooling is an umbrella term that refers to any non-pre-packaged curriculum. I prefer the term Child - Led. 

You can read what MY verson of unschooling/child led is - http://kickbuttcrazylapbooks.blogspot.com/search?q=Defining+our+HS






KickButtMama
by Shannon on Mar. 31, 2013 at 6:16 PM
1 mom liked this

I will thanks. Hopefully I'll have a clearer picture this week.

Quoting romacox:


Awesome.  Let me know when Amazon generates your widgets and links.  Also let me know what to look for so I can find them. 

Quoting KickButtMama:

Awesome, I'm actually in the middle of trying to set up my own Amazon shop - I'll let you know as soon as I get it all set!

Quoting romacox:


I went to your website, and saw where you are now selling your laptop lessons.  The best curriculum (if you can call it curriculum)  out there is created by home educators.  If you put it on Amazon, I would be willing to sell it on my website.  Here is the link to do that:  Amazon Sellers Account. You can fill your own orders, otherwise Amazon charges a warehouse fee. 

Quoting KickButtMama:

Unschooling is an umbrella term that refers to any non-pre-packaged curriculum. I prefer the term Child - Led. 

You can read what MY verson of unschooling/child led is - http://kickbuttcrazylapbooks.blogspot.com/search?q=Defining+our+HS







romacox
by Silver Member on Mar. 31, 2013 at 6:41 PM

leighp1, my grandson is a strong analytical personality, and unschooling is perfect for him.  But my granddaughter is a guardian personality, and she says she prefers more structure.  So I use the eclectic method which means I combine  different methods with unschooling. When I do use curriculum, I use what was created by home educators, because they understand that home school is not the classroom.    The following article explains the different methods used by home educators.. 

How To Home School

KickButtMama
by Shannon on Mar. 31, 2013 at 7:06 PM
1 mom liked this

LOL, same here. My eldest is very analytical - likes to pick things apart, but likes to make the choices for himself. Whereas my youngest needs to have more structure or he'd just start off into space for 12 hours...lol..

Quoting romacox:

leighp1, my grandson is a strong analytical personality, and unschooling is perfect for him.  But my granddaughter is a guardian personality, and she says she prefers more structure.  So I use the eclectic method which means I combine  different methods with unschooling. When I do use curriculum, I use what was created by home educators, because they understand that home school is not the classroom.    The following article explains the different methods used by home educators.. 

How To Home School


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