Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Make your own?? How do you stay on track????

Posted by   + Show Post
Ok, my oldest is in first grade. So I haven't purchased a curriculum of any kind.

I have a list of topics I want to cover. I don't have it broken down by grades, since we go all year long with interval breaks and days off.
My question is mainly, what do you do to keep your kids going? What happens when it's hard for them to stay motivated or focused enough to complete one task? Some days I feel like I'm pulling my hair out and other days I feel like we're not getting anything done and I end up questioning my ability to homeshool. We have days where we get so much accomplished, but they're so few and far between I feel like I'm putting them at a disadvantage by homeschooling them. (them: I also work with my four year old on math, since he's even better at reading, at times, than his older sister.)

What tips or advice do you have to feel like you're on-track?
What do you do to feel like you're not a failure at this?
What do you say to yourself to convince yourself to not give up?
by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 3:38 AM
Replies (21-30):
celticdragon77
by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 2:25 PM

http://www.coreknowledge.org/mimik/mimik_uploads/

documents/480/CKFSequence_Rev.pdf

I had to split this link up to fit it on the screen here and it won't link up - my iPad does not work well with but this seemed like an excellent site for a scope and sequence. I had like kickbuttmamas idea and googled a scope and sequence earlier when she mentioned it. This seemed pretty good. I had been using my public schools curriculum outline - which is good in many ways, but can be difficult to translate sometimes. 

celticdragon77
by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 2:49 PM

I delayed my kids start in reading. I had read A LOT of research supporting it.

When Oklahoma decided to implement the headstart program several years ago to try and improve the states reading scores - the results showed that by 3rd grade, they could not tell apart those who had participated and those that waited till 1st grade - all initial progress had been lost.

Another study done, found that the sooner a child starts school, the sooner they burn out. By about 4-5 grade they started to see it happen. It progresses and the most dramatic results of it were seen by high school. Which incidentally is exactly what American schools on average show results of.

Whereas Finland does not have their children start school until they are 8rs old - and also have shorter days (4 1/2hrs). However, their students surpass the USA students by grade 5 in reading and their country is consistently ranked number one in the world for education - ever since making these types of changes to their education system. Some say the difference is because of size and cultural. However, there is a country right near Finland who is the same in size and cultural as Finland - but practices USA methods - and gets USA results (poor ones)! 

It seems hard to explain to anyone in the USA, why you want to delay reading or have shorter days. But luckily most state laws do not require education to begin until age 8. 

I ended up delaying till age 7. I felt VERY pressured by family or else I would have waited till age 8. When I enrolled my kids into public school in 2nd/3rd grade - they were on track. Two years into public school and they are a year behind. I now have to homeschool again to catch them up again.

I do teach and have the kids use technology - as bitter-sweet as that can be. We do have a lot of creative play and such. But, yeah, the Waldorf method as a whole is not a fit for our family. But I do have an appreciation for their methods. It's very interesting - as are the people. 

Quoting Kat0038:


They definitely think and teach outside the box, which I like. But it is a twelve year commitment. His kids would be behind in ps. They don't start teaching reading until third grade. They don't introduce technology until teen years, where as in public school it is the opposite. 

Quoting celticdragon77:

A few years ago, I knew a few people who were teachers at a Waldorf school. Very interesting school - and people! It is actually what initially inspired me to homeschool. 

Quoting Kat0038:


Lol no worries. I was actually doing the same thing. See my brother is an educator, but instead of homeschooling his kids, he sends them to a Waldorf school, which costs an arm and a leg. So I was kind of thinking about him too when I replied. So you could say I was rambleing too. 

Quoting celticdragon77:












"live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air..." Emerson 

ablessedlife
by Member on Apr. 3, 2013 at 2:54 PM
5 moms liked this
This is what I say to myself, "If you send them to school, you will just be trading your problems for other problems."
Kat0038
by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 3:11 PM


Well one of the joys of homeschooling is being able to use a method that works best for your kids. I have seriously been thinking about putting reading on the shelf. My husband talks about wanting to try unschooling. I have been doing unit studies. Maybe I should combine all three. 

Quoting celticdragon77:

I delayed my kids start in reading. I had read A LOT of research supporting it.

When Oklahoma decided to implement the headstart program several years ago to try and improve the states reading scores - the results showed that by 3rd grade, they could not tell apart those who had participated and those that waited till 1st grade - all initial progress had been lost.

Another study done, found that the sooner a child starts school, the sooner they burn out. By about 4-5 grade they started to see it happen. It progresses and the most dramatic results of it were seen by high school. Which incidentally is exactly what American schools on average show results of.

Whereas Finland does not have their children start school until they are 8rs old - and also have shorter days (4 1/2hrs). However, their students surpass the USA students by grade 5 in reading and their country is consistently ranked number one in the world for education - ever since making these types of changes to their education system. Some say the difference is because of size and cultural. However, there is a country right near Finland who is the same in size and cultural as Finland - but practices USA methods - and gets USA results (poor ones)! 

It seems hard to explain to anyone in the USA, why you want to delay reading or have shorter days. But luckily most state laws do not require education to begin until age 8. 

I ended up delaying till age 7. I felt VERY pressured by family or else I would have waited till age 8. When I enrolled my kids into public school in 2nd/3rd grade - they were on track. Two years into public school and they are a year behind. I now have to homeschool again to catch them up again.

I do teach and have the kids use technology - as bitter-sweet as that can be. We do have a lot of creative play and such. But, yeah, the Waldorf method as a whole is not a fit for our family. But I do have an appreciation for their methods. It's very interesting - as are the people. 

Quoting Kat0038:


They definitely think and teach outside the box, which I like. But it is a twelve year commitment. His kids would be behind in ps. They don't start teaching reading until third grade. They don't introduce technology until teen years, where as in public school it is the opposite. 

Quoting celticdragon77:

A few years ago, I knew a few people who were teachers at a Waldorf school. Very interesting school - and people! It is actually what initially inspired me to homeschool. 

Quoting Kat0038:


Lol no worries. I was actually doing the same thing. See my brother is an educator, but instead of homeschooling his kids, he sends them to a Waldorf school, which costs an arm and a leg. So I was kind of thinking about him too when I replied. So you could say I was rambleing too. 

Quoting celticdragon77:














celticdragon77
by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 6:15 PM

http://www.worldbook.com/typical-course-of-study 

Found another link

Quoting celticdragon77:

http://www.coreknowledge.org/mimik/mimik_uploads/

documents/480/CKFSequence_Rev.pdf

I had to split this link up to fit it on the screen here and it won't link up - my iPad does not work well with but this seemed like an excellent site for a scope and sequence. I had like kickbuttmamas idea and googled a scope and sequence earlier when she mentioned it. This seemed pretty good. I had been using my public schools curriculum outline - which is good in many ways, but can be difficult to translate sometimes. 


"live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air..." Emerson 

KickButtMama
by Shannon on Apr. 3, 2013 at 7:05 PM

My fav was - http://worldbook.com/typical-course-of-study

Quoting hipmomto3:


Do you know a good source for printing scope & sequence?

Quoting KickButtMama:

When I started doing my own curriculum, my baseline became - "As long as they are learning every day, then I'm happy"

But I'm a type A personality, so I likke having things written out. What I did was make a 3 ring binder. I printed several scope & sequences for every single grade. I organized them by grade and put them all in the one giant notebook. Whenever my kids master a concept, I go into the notebook and highlight it - no matter the grade it's listed under. So the kids aren't learning in the same linear fashion the PS follows. They might do a concept found in grade K one day and grade 11 the next. I don't care about that. We go toward mastery - as long as the kids are learning, absorbing and mastering the concepts? I'm a happy girl.




QueenCreole313
by Julia on Apr. 3, 2013 at 7:37 PM
2 moms liked this

How do I feel on track? 


I have quickly learned that because homeschooling FEELS so relaxed that we often don't THINK we have accomplished much. So, I chose started to keep track of everything in a blog. I wanted to do this for myself (and family members) as proof of what we are learning.  I make monthly plans for the coming month. Then, I review what we have learned at the end of the month. It keeps me motivated and gives me a sense of accomplishment. When I don't think we did anything I can refer back to our proof in written blog form! 

When you feel like a failure....
You will. There is no way around it. But redefine failure. Failure (to me) is GIVING UP! I will never give up on my son and his education. We may take a break, walk away from a lesson or throw tantrums but we will always try, try, try again! 

I tell myself that if I can make it through today, all is well. Stop worrying about tomorrow, today is enough trouble of its own. And guess what? Everyday I make it through! 
GELiz
by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 8:11 PM
1 mom liked this

As a teacher, here are some things that I do.

I make a year long schedule- its just a plan that tells me how long I want to pursue each topic. then I work from that plan to plan the months and then the weeks.  If you are getting behind, you can just tweek what you are doing, or change the plan- which ever seems the best.

Rmember there are two ways of looking at education- YOu can delve deep and cover a subject till the skills are solid, memory is there, or you can stay til its boring.

Or you can cover the material, let them get what they get and then move on. For subjects like spelling, reading and math, you want to make sure the skills have been mastered. For Science and Social Studies, you can have a little more slack about how much to cover.


twyliatepeka
by Bronze Member on Apr. 3, 2013 at 11:10 PM
My dd is about to be 6 & she is into the civil war too! :) I never knew kids so young would be interested in the civil war. She brought it up on her own too was what surprised me.


Quoting LilrockerMama:

Mobile Photo

I try to switch subjects when my son is uninterested. Or try to make it fun to talk about or play a game or just take a break. I'm really unorganized though and trying to work on that so I'm no help, sorry! He is 8 and he loves talking about the civil war so even though it wasn't in any of our plans for a long time I went out and bought stuff and we put together a board for him to keep in his room and I'm going to try n set up a day for him to go to my class and present it. Lol he's really excited about it and after we did that we have had a better time.

Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
LilrockerMama
by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 11:41 PM
Same here it's crazy! He is also going to be a paleontologist and when he turns 22 he's moving to Wyoming to work at some geologic museum.. Or something like that! Lol wish we could get them two together!

Quoting twyliatepeka:

My dd is about to be 6 & she is into the civil war too! :) I never knew kids so young would be interested in the civil war. She brought it up on her own too was what surprised me.




Quoting LilrockerMama:

Mobile Photo

I try to switch subjects when my son is uninterested. Or try to make it fun to talk about or play a game or just take a break. I'm really unorganized though and trying to work on that so I'm no help, sorry! He is 8 and he loves talking about the civil war so even though it wasn't in any of our plans for a long time I went out and bought stuff and we put together a board for him to keep in his room and I'm going to try n set up a day for him to go to my class and present it. Lol he's really excited about it and after we did that we have had a better time.

Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)