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Going to be starting kindergarden any advice?

Posted by on Apr. 4, 2013 at 3:57 AM
  • 12 Replies

I have my boys doing ABCMouse.com and my older one doing worksheets he is 4 right now he can do his abc spell his name count up to 30, starting to learn sounds to letters and working on reading. He is really good at math and can add and subtract simple problems.


 I think he is doing good Im kinda having a hard time with this reading thing.

I want to know if I should go to my public school for homeschooling or somewhere else?

by on Apr. 4, 2013 at 3:57 AM
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romacox
by Silver Member on Apr. 4, 2013 at 6:41 AM

Katiebeth1821, my children are now grown, but I still tutor, and my expertise is in reading.  My method in this area is so successful that three professors at the University of North Florida are asking me to teach their students my method.  

Nine times out of ten, if a child knows their phonic sounds, but is having trouble reading, it is because they are pronouncing some of the letters incorrectly.  For example if they pronounce the sound of d as Du they will read daddy as du-a-du-y.  If they pronounce h as Hu, and p as Pu, they will sound out happy as hu-a-pu-y.  This makes it hard for many children  to blend the sounds so as to hear the correct word. It makes for slow readers, or inefficient readers.   I am not familiar with ABCMouse, but many of the computer phonics games teach some or more of these sounds incorrectly b,c,d,g,h,j,k,m,p,t,w.  The following video explains how to teach those sounds should be taught. 

I have helped children from K through 6th grade with this problem.   When that is corrected, most children will no longer have problems reading. The following video explains:

P.S. Computer games are good for some things, but not for teaching the phonic sounds.  Parents can make sure the sounds are pronounced correctly....computers can't.

katiebeth1821
by on Apr. 4, 2013 at 6:55 AM

Thank you for the video it helped. I was wondering would my sons speech delay be a factor?


Quoting romacox:

Katiebeth1821, my children are now grown, but I still tutor, and my expertise is in reading.  My method in this area is so successful that three professors at the University of North Florida are asking me to teach their students my method.  

Nine times out of ten, if a child knows their phonic sounds, but is having trouble reading, it is because they are pronouncing some of the letters incorrectly.  For example if they pronounce the sound of d as Du they will read daddy as du-a-du-y.  If they pronounce h as Hu, and p as Pu, they will sound out happy as hu-a-pu-y.  This makes it hard for many children  to blend the sounds so as to hear the correct word. It makes for slow readers, or inefficient readers.   I am not familiar with ABCMouse, but many of the computer phonics games teach some or more of these sounds incorrectly b,c,d,g,h,j,k,m,p,t,w.  The following video explains how to teach those sounds should be taught. 

I have helped children from K through 6th grade with this problem.   When that is corrected, most children will no longer have problems reading. The following video explains:

P.S. Computer games are good for some things, but not for teaching the phonic sounds.  Parents can make sure the sounds are pronounced correctly....computers can't.


romacox
by Silver Member on Apr. 4, 2013 at 7:16 AM

Katibeth 1821m does the following video describe your son?


katiebeth1821
by on Apr. 4, 2013 at 7:28 AM

oh that is my son for sure.  Im learning so much.  Thank you

Quoting romacox:

Katibeth 1821m does the following video describe your son?



romacox
by Silver Member on Apr. 4, 2013 at 7:51 AM

Then his speech delay is very unlikely to be a learning disability.  My grandson was an NT.  He hated flash cards, but loved learning phonics with a board game I use to teach phonics and reading.  With the game, he quickly learned the phonic sounds, could read the early reader books, and could sound out large words like "premium" as we played word games while  traveling.  But he ,like many NTs, would not read on his own.  So his mother wisely read to him daily.  NTs love being read to.

One day he became excited about knowing what was inside of a book with an interesting picture on the cover.  So he asked his mom to read it to him.  She told him that she did not have the time at that moment.  To excited to wait, Koty began reading the book independently of her.  His mom let him stay up late that night reading.  From that day forward, he became an avid reader, and his reading advanced several grade levels in a very short time. This is typical of analytically personalities,  In fact Einstein was an NT.  His teacher thought him too dumb to learn.  Boy was she wrong.

So make sure he is pronouncing all the sounds correctly, read to him daily,  play word games (NT like games/ whole brain teaching) with him so as to retain what he has learned, and purchase books, and games that interest him. 

romacox
by Silver Member on Apr. 4, 2013 at 7:57 AM

P.S. My little brother was an NT.  He loved (actually obsessed with)  Monopoly from 5 years of age through his early teens.  From that game he learned money counting, strategy,  adding, subtracting and even improved his reading skills.  When you home school, the whole world can become your classroom.

romacox
by Silver Member on Apr. 4, 2013 at 8:33 AM
1 mom liked this

katibeth 1821, here is a tip that I have used with NTs that I tutor.  I find out what their favorite books are, and buy some which are close to their grade level. 

For one of my kids, it was Star Wars.  I would begin reading the book, and deliberately pause periodically.  He was so interested in what came next that he would automatically  begin reading.  I let him read for awhile, and then began reading myself again.  We continued in this manner.  So he was getting his reading in without any forcing  from me.  

Also I use a game (Ring Around The Phonics) to teach them root words, prefixes and suffixes (along with their meanings).  Then I find large words in a book, and play a game to see if they can decode the word.  This helps them to decode the larger words.  So it improves reading, spelling and vocabulary.

I hope this has given you some ideas. 

oredeb
by debbie on Apr. 4, 2013 at 9:43 AM
1 mom liked this

 good post!!!!

usmom3
by BJ on Apr. 4, 2013 at 12:38 PM
2 moms liked this

 Looks like you have gotten some great info & help.

maggiemom2000
by Member on Apr. 4, 2013 at 10:22 PM

Here are some links to activities to do!

Growing Readers

Are you Growing a Reader? Homeschooling your early reader? No need to buy an expensive curriculum to get your child off to a great start at reading. Do you want to avoid tedious, boring worksheets and instead learn through engaging hands on activities and play? Here are a collection of links on teaching your child to read and write for free:

Sight Words or Phonics? How about a balanced approach?


Read some background on using a balanced literacy approach to teach your child to read. What does your Kindergartner need to learn in reading? See the list of Common Core Kindergarten Standards and links to activities to teach those skills to your emergent reader.

What do I need to Buy?

The short answer: nothing. You can do all of the lessons and activities here using books from the library and things you already have around the house like paper, pens, chalk, and index cards. In this post I suggest some possible things you can buy to enhance the activities. These are supplies that you will be able to use for years, not just for a couple of lessons. Manipulatives like a good set of magnetic letters can be used from preschool into elementary school, beginning with basic letter identification, on to phonics, building sight words, word families and complex multisyllabic spelling words.

Shared Literature

Read, read, read to your child. Reading aloud to your child is the best thing you can do to grow a reader. Go beyond reading aloud and teach your child reading skills while enjoying great literature! (Preschool, Pre-K, Kindergarten)

Early Alphabet Learning and the Name Game

How to begin teaching the alphabet and other early literacy skills to your preschooler or Kindergartner. (Preschool, Pre-K, Kindergarten)

Kindergarten Sight Words and Early Reading Skills

What you need to know to get started teaching your Kindergartner to read including a look at some of the Common Core Standards for Kindergarten reading. (Kindergarten)

Kindergarten Sight Word Sentences

After you know about teaching sight words to your Kindergartner you are ready to move on to sentences. (Kindergarten)

Kindergarten Sight Words Reading Books

Once you start introducing your child to the sight words he is ready for his first emergent-reader book. (Kindergarten)

Beginning Phonics for Emergent Readers

Once your child knows most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds he is ready to learn to "sound out" simple CVC words. This post shows you lots of hands on multi-sensory ways to practice early phonics. (Kindergarten, First Grade)

Learn 37 Words and Know how to Read and Write Over 500 Words!

Your child can learn more phonics "rules" by learning several words with common letter patterns. When your child learns to make analogies and manipulate onset and rime they can quickly read and write hundreds of new words. These are better known as word families. (Kindergarten, First Grade, Second Grade)
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