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Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

Holding your child back...

Posted by on Apr. 13, 2013 at 8:44 PM
  • 27 Replies

I need to hold my child back. He's a 4th grader and he has not done enough of the standards to pass. I want him to be held back. I do not want advice on getting him to pass the state test or whatever, because I seriously think he is not ready for grade 5.

So, anyway, have any of you held a child back? What is the process? I'm in Florida. Do you think I'll get "in trouble" that he has not passed the grade?


by on Apr. 13, 2013 at 8:44 PM
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Replies (1-10):
lucsch
by on Apr. 13, 2013 at 8:47 PM

Just keep on teaching and learning. Why do you think he has "failed?" Why are you using "standards"? Do you agree with them? Why do you have to pick a grade level? Is that part of Florida law?

PepperWillow
by on Apr. 13, 2013 at 8:50 PM

I wish it wasn't but to my understanding it is. He has to meet the standards by taking a test or submitting a portfolio of his work throughout the year.

Quoting lucsch:

Just keep on teaching and learning. Why do you think he has "failed?" Why are you using "standards"? Do you agree with them? Why do you have to pick a grade level? Is that part of Florida law?

If anyone knows different, please let me know. I hate "grade levels". We learn everyday.



usmom3
by BJ on Apr. 13, 2013 at 9:03 PM

 Do you know his learning style? Maybe the material you are using isn't right for his learning style! I don't know if you will get in trouble or not but I think it is hypocritical of the school if you do, because you know that they won't punish a teacher if one of their students got help back.

Can't you do what the public schools do & do summer school with him to get him a little caught up?

PepperWillow
by on Apr. 13, 2013 at 9:08 PM

I intend to teach him year round, but I really think he needs to repeat the entire grade. See, I thought he needed to be held back in grade 3 when he went to public school. The principal and teacher refused even though he was getting Ds and struggling.

He just needs a catch up year. He spent most of this year relearning grade 3. We are no where near the end of grade 4 standards.

Quoting usmom3:

 Do you know his learning style? Maybe the material you are using isn't right for his learning style! I don't know if you will get in trouble or not but I think it is hypocritical of the school if you do, because you know that they won't punish a teacher if one of their students got help back.

Can't you do what the public schools do & do summer school with him to get him a little caught up?



usmom3
by BJ on Apr. 13, 2013 at 9:15 PM

 Then that is what I would put in your information that you have to give them. Tell about the things he has improved on & how you plan on helping him improve on the things he didn't.

Quoting PepperWillow:

I intend to teach him year round, but I really think he needs to repeat the entire grade. See, I thought he needed to be held back in grade 3 when he went to public school. The principal and teacher refused even though he was getting Ds and struggling.

He just needs a catch up year. He spent most of this year relearning grade 3. We are no where near the end of grade 4 standards.

Quoting usmom3:

 Do you know his learning style? Maybe the material you are using isn't right for his learning style! I don't know if you will get in trouble or not but I think it is hypocritical of the school if you do, because you know that they won't punish a teacher if one of their students got help back.

Can't you do what the public schools do & do summer school with him to get him a little caught up?


 

lucsch
by on Apr. 13, 2013 at 9:38 PM
1 mom liked this

I don't live in Florida, so I don't know how it works in a practical sense, but I don't see anything that says he has to reach any particular level by any certain age or grade. I see that you need proof of the work you did and an evaluation that progress was made. Here is a summary I found:

Section 1002.01, F.S., defines home education as the sequentially progressive instruction of a student directed by his or her parent or guardian in order to satisfy Florida's compulsory education requirements.

Florida Statute 1002.41 specifies the responsibilities of parents who establish a home education program.

  • Send a written notice of intent to the school district superintendent. The notice must be filed within 30 days of beginning the home education program and must include the following information:
    • Name of the home education student(s)
    • Birthdate(s)
    • Address
    • Parent's signature
  • Maintain a portfolio of educational records. Statute defines a portfolio as
    • A log of educational activities which is made contemporaneously with the instruction and which designates by title any reading materials used, and
    • samples of any writings, worksheets, workbooks or creative materials used or developed by the student.
  • Make the portfolio available for inspection by the superintendent upon 15-day written notice (The statute does not require the superintendent to inspect all portfolios).
  • Provide an annual educational evaluation of the student's educational progress to the superintendent. The evaluation must consist of one of the following:
    • A Florida certified teacher chosen by the parent may evaluate the child's progress based on a review of the portfolio and discussion with the student.
    • The student may take any nationally-normed student achievement test administered by a certified teacher.
    • The student may take a state student assessment test at a location and under testing conditions approved by the school district.
    • The student maybe evaluated by a psychologist holding a valid, active license pursuant to Section 490.003 (7) or (8), F.S.
    • The student may be evaluated with any other valid measurement tool as mutually agreed upon by the parent and the superintendent.
  • Preserve each student's portfolio for two years.
  • Submit a letter of termination to the school district superintendent upon completion of the home education program, enrollment in a public or private school or moving from the district.
KrissyKC
by Silver Member on Apr. 13, 2013 at 11:49 PM

Do you feel he needs held back in all areas or just reading, just math, just writing... etc.?

If he only needs one class remedial, you don't have to hold him back as an entire grade unless you feel it affects all classes.   Let's say it's reading.  You might need to do more dictation to him for his other classes and give him some remedial reading work... maybe even a good tutor in reading.

I made the decision to do 6th grade math twice with my daughter because she was too far ahead and she was getting sloppy with her work so much that it was affecting the results.   So, I chose a different curriculum so we could do 6th grade math again.  However, I didn't really "hold" her back a grade or anything, I just adjusted the math we were doing.   I don't live in Florida, though.

Editing to add... she has since regained that year and is again two grades ahead in math. 


QueenCreole313
by Julia on Apr. 14, 2013 at 7:03 AM
1 mom liked this

Are you required to have a grade level? My state says we can but are not required to. As long as we make progress Im happy. Dont be so hard on yourself or him, I think children feed off of our energy. 

romacox
by Silver Member on Apr. 14, 2013 at 7:42 AM

If you are keeping him in the public school system, you go by how they measure children, and hold him back. However if you are choosing to home school him, he receives no such measure. You simply teach at were he needs to learn, and each subject may be different. He may be advanced in some subjects, and struggling in others. does that make sense?


Quoting PepperWillow:

I wish it wasn't but to my understanding it is. He has to meet the standards by taking a test or submitting a portfolio of his work throughout the year.

Quoting lucsch:

Just keep on teaching and learning. Why do you think he has "failed?" Why are you using "standards"? Do you agree with them? Why do you have to pick a grade level? Is that part of Florida law?

If anyone knows different, please let me know. I hate "grade levels". We learn everyday.



romacox
by Silver Member on Apr. 14, 2013 at 7:52 AM
1 mom liked this

As A Tutor and home eduator, I am going to share an important observation concerning some children in the public school system. There are some children who actually do better on the same test at the beginning of kindergarten than they do after a year of schooling. They start out excited and enthusiastic, and learn quickly. However when they return to me at the beginning of first grade they are very different.

Not only has their enthusiasm disappeared, but they also display stress and behavior problems not present before. I discovered that when these same children are tutored at home (rather than at school) they calm down and read better. One of the things that I have learned to do when teaching these children at school, is to make sure I help them stay calm, use games to teach, give extra encouragement, and reassure them I am not scolding them when focusing them on the task at hand.

The children I am speaking of are often naturally energetic. But stress seems to be the key as to what is happening to them. When children or adults are under stress, the body releases a toxic hormone called cortosol. This hormone can cause or mimic behavior problems and learning disabilities (Dyslexia, ADD, ADHD, ext.). It is not healthy for anyone to experience this stress over a long period of time. If this describes your child I recommend the following articles.

The Hands On Learner

Conditions That Are Often Misdiagnosed As Learning Disabilities (Like ADHD)

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