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The Misunderstood Face of Giftedness

Posted by on Apr. 16, 2013 at 7:10 AM
  • 15 Replies
3 moms liked this
by on Apr. 16, 2013 at 7:10 AM
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bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Apr. 16, 2013 at 7:48 AM

 Great article!

I think that one of the reasons most people don't talk to their doctor about giftedness is that there is this myth that giftedness is rare and "everyone thinks their child is gifted." 

Also the public schools will often place a requirement of "maturity" on putting children in a gifted program.  That right there shows a preconception of what giftedness is.

serendipitykdk
by on Apr. 16, 2013 at 8:41 AM

This is a great article...and should be read by all those the the educational and health fields (if they are willing enough to a) spend the time to read it and b) open their minds to it). Thanks so much for sharing it!! 

And bluerooffarm, not only are the children expected to show a sense of 'maturity' but the criteria for gifted programs in the public schools where we are?  Simply high grades.  No consideration for gifted variations whatsoever; extraordinarilly narrow-minded and that 'wonderful' concept of training sheep and fitting all into the same square box.

SusanTheWriter
by on Apr. 16, 2013 at 9:33 AM
1 mom liked this

My DD's depression can be traced to a 5th grade classroom and a teacher who refused to believe that DD was gifted. She wasn't a mature, focused class leader, ergo, she couldn't possibly be gifted.

It took me almost 3 more years to convince DD that she was genuinely gifted...just wired differently than other kids.

School really doesn't serve the "twice excpetional," either - kids who are gifted, but also have some other issue, whether it's a LD, or a diagnosis of ADD or autism or anything else.

I've heard more stories of the gifted kids who fall through the cracks than average or struggling learners who receive so many services through the school district.

Mandallyn
by Member on Apr. 16, 2013 at 10:08 AM

I think I have a 6yr old that would fall into this category.  He displays behavior similar to what you would expect from a child with ADHD, with the exception that if it's something he's interested in he'll sit and focus on it for hours.  He loves being challenged, but has a hard time with new concepts. I know that sounds contradictory.  

Thank you for posting. This is something I will keep in mind for all my children. :)

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Apr. 16, 2013 at 10:08 AM

 

Quoting serendipitykdk:

This is a great article...and should be read by all those the the educational and health fields (if they are willing enough to a) spend the time to read it and b) open their minds to it). Thanks so much for sharing it!! 

And bluerooffarm, not only are the children expected to show a sense of 'maturity' but the criteria for gifted programs in the public schools where we are?  Simply high grades.  No consideration for gifted variations whatsoever; extraordinarilly narrow-minded and that 'wonderful' concept of training sheep and fitting all into the same square box.

 It's really no better where they give an IQ test.  We were given an IQ test ad I scored in the "gifted range" but because I was "constantly acting out" I was too immature to be placed.  When I would finish my math lessons, I would call all the kids from their desks to do something else.  Because the teacher lost control of her classroom, I was labeled immature, a troublemaker, an all around bad kid.  It followed me for YEARS until the middle school gifted teacher realized what was going on. 

I swore that my kids would not go through what I had.  I fought the ps, then realized it wasn't worth the fight.  I brought them home and we are so blessed to learn together.

LadeeBellaDonna
by on Apr. 16, 2013 at 10:27 AM

I haven't read the article but I have 2 "gifted" kids, and another one that may need the GT (Gifted and Talented) class if I wasn't homeschooling (she's the same way as poster Mandallyn described her little one). They were placed in the GT program in PS kindergarten and have done really great with it. But the teachers do expect more from GT kids than most students. When my oldest DD was in 4th grade she was having big problems in math. I found out at the END of the year that it was because the teacher wasn't trying to help her, she expected her to be able to instantly figure out what to do, kinda like "drop the paper in front of her and say do it and she aces it". I had several conversations with the teacher telling me that my DD was causing trouble in the class and she wasn't focusing. Found out that was her outlet... she isn't a trouble maker at all... she's a great kid! I thought it was odd. A couple months into 5th grade she was still having trouble with math so we decided to put her in Sylvan, that tutoring school. She picked up everything she missed and even excelled past her grade level! She hasn't had a problem since. But I was explained by the ladies at Sylvan that just because a student is GT doesn't mean they won't have trouble with some subjects. They are still like other kids they just see and understand the world differently. My DD does comprehend things on a more mature level... even sometimes more than I do. But I've lived with her for 12 years so understanding her and helping her is like second nature for me.

LadeeBellaDonna
by on Apr. 16, 2013 at 10:43 AM

Wow... very informative article (I went back to read it... same things I've experienced)... thanks for posting it!

lucsch
by on Apr. 16, 2013 at 1:49 PM

Exactly, and my experience with this issue myself in public school is the main reason I homeschool my only daughter.

KrissyKC
by Silver Member on Apr. 16, 2013 at 1:50 PM

I will come back and read this when I have more time!!   This is so my daughter... and possibly me, too.

She is super smart, but has social and emotional issues.   So did I growing up and still do.   She's the kind that just never fits in her skin, simple tasks are a huge burden, basic daily hygiene is challenging, simple things that are normal for maturing and growing up are gigantic hurdles.

However, her ability to absorb and retain deep concepts and facts and mathematical concepts is just totally off the charts.   I've had to hold her back in math because of her inability to DO the actual work.. but she knew the concepts and could perform on tests.   She was just so sloppy and had such a hard time doing it, though.

Her speech was always super advance, reading skills advanced... but to create, write, draw, etc... she's always been behind the other kids.


mommy4lyf
by on Apr. 16, 2013 at 1:58 PM

I love this article thanks for sharing... I will re-share this. Thanks!

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